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 Post subject: Karole Armitage
PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2003 7:48 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 191
Location: Florence
In Europe Karole Armitage is considered one of the most outstanding dance makers from USA. She is 'advertised' to be one of the most clever audacious and renowned choreographers in States. But is it the truth? What do you think about her work? Have you attended some ballet of hers in these last years?

<small>[ 10 April 2004, 03:17 AM: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Karole Armitage
PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2003 8:47 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 02, 1999 12:01 am
Posts: 2708
Location: Seattle, WA USA
I have only seen videos of Armitage's work. It is an interesting mix of ballet and modern, often using avant garde or rock music, and interesting sets. She is married to visual artist David Salle, I believe. She danced in the Cunningham company for while, was commissioned by ABT to do a piece during the Baryshnikov era, and is now based in Europe. I never found her vocabulary extremely innovative; rather it seemed a post modern continuation of the Cunningham aesthetic of random combination of disparate elements.


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 Post subject: Re: Karole Armitage
PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2003 6:33 am 
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Joined: Sat Aug 31, 2002 11:01 pm
Posts: 537
Location: New Orleans, LA
I only saw one program of her work, at the Joyce Theater some years ago. I recall very little other than it left me laughing at it and that the music was loud and repetitive.


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 Post subject: Re: Karole Armitage
PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2003 9:48 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 191
Location: Florence
Thank you for your memories. I asked about her because she is considered very very much in Europe but I suspect that her true creative period was in the 80ies. Her supporters go on saying she is so celebrated in USA right now but indeed I have not heard about her from US friends and reports for a very long time... I look forward to hearing other things from you.


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 Post subject: Re: Karole Armitage
PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2003 3:20 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 22, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 17498
Location: SF Bay Area
Hi! I'm moving this to Modern Dance. Follow the link above.

<small>[ 16 March 2003, 04:21 PM: Message edited by: Azlan ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Karole Armitage
PostPosted: Mon Mar 01, 2004 12:13 am 
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Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 6778
Location: Estonia
Quote:
Voguing to Sounds of Bartok

By VALERIE GLADSTONE
The New York Times
February 29, 2004

Karole Armitage watched from the sidelines of a studio in Midtown Manhattan as 12 dancers leaped like birds frightened by a sudden storm. They were joined onstage by three male voguers, their limbs moving in fluid, mesmerizing contortions to the eerie, percussive score by Bartok. Then the dancer Sharmila Desai began a series of slow-motion backbends and headstands, alternating them with yogalike meditations.
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 Post subject: Re: Karole Armitage
PostPosted: Sat Mar 06, 2004 7:43 am 
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Posts: 6778
Location: Estonia
Quote:
Under Copper Stars, Ghosts in Leotards

By JENNIFER DUNNING
The New York Times
March 5, 2004

Karole Armitage's "Time Is the Echo of an Axe Within a Wood," a world premiere performed at the Joyce Theater on Tuesday night, is one of the most beautiful dances to be seen in New York in a very long time.

Ms. Armitage's three inspired collaborators — David Salle, the set designer; Peter Speliopoulous, who created the metallic leotards; and most of all Clifton Taylor, who designed the fluid, exquisitely subtle lighting — could all rest on their laurels after this.
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 Post subject: Re: Karole Armitage
PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2004 1:17 am 
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Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Merce Me
At the Joyce, Karole Armitage was showing her Cunningham roots; uptown at City Center, Paul Taylor dipped into his back pages. By Laura Shapiro for New York Metro


Karole Armitage is 49 now. She no longer blazes hell-bent across the stage in her own choreography, she’s quit cranking up her music to total-annihilation decibels, and since 1989, she’s spent most of her time in Europe. In short, she’s handed in her title as downtown’s punk ballerina. But when she unveiled her latest work with the ad hoc company she calls Armitage Gone! Dance at the Joyce earlier this month, there was no mistaking who was in charge.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2005 1:22 am 
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Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 6778
Location: Estonia
Quote:
The Punk Ballerina Returns, With Souvenirs
by KRISTIN HOHENADEL for the New York Times

"But with movies making more money than anyone had ever dreamed of, and Michael Jackson and Madonna selling billions of records - it just became too powerful. I started feeling that if I was too oriented toward pop culture all I would do is to fail to be as good as they were at it - and that it's really important, in fact, to differentiate, so that we are an alternative version of the world."

published: November 27, 2005
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 9:37 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
Back in Town, Embracing Everything (Just About)
by JOHN ROCKWELL for the New York Times

Mixed in, however, are all manner of modernisms, a deployment of the body that far transcends ballet formality. Dancers twist and contort themselves. They drag and are dragged. They touch one another to trigger new movement. There are elements of Asian dance and American black street dance and you name it.

published: December 3, 2005
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2005 12:58 am 
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Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 6778
Location: Estonia
Quote:
Molten Ballet
Pushing classicism's boundaries into the stratosphere
by DEBORAH JOWITT for the Village Voice

The term "drastic classicism" describes her newest work, in this dream that dogs me. After building a big and ongoing career in Europe...

published: December 6, 2005
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 11:18 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 12:01 am
Posts: 350
Location: San Francisco
Going, Going, Gone!

Armitage Gone! Dance
Presented by San Francisco Performances
Yerba Buena Center for the Arts
Saturday, October 13, 2007, 8PM


Summer is officially hidden away by San Francisco's fall-time fog, which means that dance season is finally here. With a two-day engagement hosted by San Francisco Performances at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Armitage Gone! Dance, a New York-based company led by Karole Armitage, kicked off my dance calendar this past weekend. But alas, the kick proved to be more of a poke and the anticipated bang resembled a sigh.

Armitage, who danced for Balanchine, Cunningham, and others before spending a few decades across the pond (and no, not in Oakland, but in Europe), rests on what she knows, ballet vocabulary, and her two works, Ligeti Essays and Time is the echo of an axe within a wood, display this. But pairing ballet steps and a tinge of modern dance together a ballet you do not make, Yoda might say, and this was the case last Saturday night.

Ligeti Essays, reminiscent of modern versions of Balanchine’s Stars and Stripes, "Rubies," and The Four Temperaments, featured the company with taped music and vocals by composer György Ligeti. Even with the women costumed in basic black leotards and belts and the men in ill-fitting ankle hitting black pants, tanks, and socks, the seven dancers outshined the work by far, kicking, jumping, and pirouetting with grace and power. The choreography, though, suffered immensely, never growing quite past the superficial stage of the "boy meets girl" aspect of steps and positions. The dancers looked disinterested throughout the intermingling of solos, duets, and group work, even with cool blue lights illuminating their feet and the steely silver tree randomly positioned in the background. Perhaps their thoughts were focused more on the international roller derby championships taking place across the city; it sure would have been more exciting.

Time is the echo of an axe within a wood
, set to music by Béla Bartók, somewhat improved upon the first half. Strands of sparkly beads hung from the ceiling, creating a box-like effect around the stage, and the dancers were dressed in (again ill-fitting) leotards of gold, silver, and bronze. With softer lighting and more developed movement, the dancers appeared more focused, but again, the choreography left little to be desired. Moving to the beat became monotonous after awhile, and Time’s only saviors were the company’s impressive dancers: Leonides D. Arpon, Matthew Brahnam, Frances Chiaverini, Theresa Ruth Howard, William Isaac, Ryan Kelly, and Mei-Hua Wang.

This performance left me speechless, and not in a good way. Armitage has a small army of well-trained dancers at her fingertips and decades of dance and performance under her belt, but can’t seem to use them to her advantage. Perhaps she’s not meant to be a choreographer. And really, is that such a bad thing?

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