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PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2008 7:37 am 
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Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 223
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Thanks so much RaHir! :)

The CND are now performing in Barcelona, I attended yesterday ALAS, which I know quite well.

I hope you enjoy Nacho Duato's work and CND's dance in San Francisco and look forward to reading your comments :)

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 20, 2008 3:48 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 12:01 am
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Location: San Francisco
I'll be at YBCA tonight to see CND. Is anyone else planning to go this weekend?

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 20, 2008 5:18 pm 
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Location: San Francisco
Duato's Compañía Nacional de Danza in S.F.
Mary Ellen Hunt
San Francisco Chronicle
Sunday, February 17, 2008
Quote:
Go to any San Francisco Ballet show and, near the back of the War Memorial Opera House, you can often see young students of the San Francisco Ballet School lurking in the standing room, garnering inspiration from the company's performances. In early 2001, somewhere in the darkness, that's where Kayoko Everhart fell in love with Nacho Duato's intimate and emotional "Without Words."

"I was crazy about it," says Everhart, now 24. "That was my first experience with a Nacho ballet and I absolutely loved it."

But little did she dream that, years later, she would return to the city as a member of Duato's own Compañía Nacional de Danza, when San Francisco Performances presents the company's San Francisco debut this week at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts.

With the good looks of a model, the statuesque Everhart has a presence and elegant line that stood out even during her school years. At the San Francisco Ballet School Showcase in 2002, she delighted the audience with her stylish humor in the role of the Queen of the Amazons in Lew Christensen's "Con Amore."

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 11:26 am 
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Location: San Francisco
Compañía Nacional de Danza
Presented by San Francisco Performances
Performed at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts
Program A
Wednesday, February 20, 2008, 8PM

San Francisco houses numerous dance companies, but we don’t have anything quite like Compañía Nacional de Danza. Led by artistic director and choreographer Nacho Duato, the company’s amazingly talented dancers hail from all over the world and what they brought to the Yerba Buena stage last night was something I’ve never experienced. The company, over two hours, explored current and historical issues through powerful contemporary dance and received a well-deserved standing ovation from a full house.

Duato has a style all of his own, stressing the strong use of canon, repetition, rhythm, and justifiable unison. His movement leans towards curves and sweeping limbs with well-placed hops, and themes range from literal to more abstract. Here on the local stage, we were treated to three of his more focused issues: castration, slavery, and drugs, all in some way or another delving into who we are as individuals and in short, how we define ourselves and identify with those around us.

“White Darkness,” Duato’s introspective look at drug use and abuse, brought the crowd to its feet. With sand dropping from above and brushing to and fro, Ana María López, Amaury Lebrun, Soojee Watman, Francisco Lorenzo, África Guzmán, Randy Castillo, Inês Pereira, and Fabrice Edelmann, dressed in reddish black, danced in pairs. They resembled the body and how it responds to drugs: quick and flighty at the onset and lethargic at the end. As the lead couple, Yolanda Martín and Dimo Kirilov swept from one end of the stage, leaping and embracing until she makes a potentially deadly decision. All the while Jaffar Chalabi’s honeycomb-like structure grew and stretched upwards in the background, and the dancers, set, and falling dust continued to morph like a quick-spinning kaleidoscope against Karl Jenkins’ “Adeimus Variations” and “String Quartet No. 2”). Joop Caboort’s lighting design came to fruition at the finale, leaving many to gasp as the beauty of sand, body, and shadow.

“Castrati” opened with eight male dancers (including Dimi Kirilov, Isaac Montllor, Clyde Archer, Joel Toledo, Fabrice Edelmann, Francisco Lorenzo, Amaury Lebrun, and Héctor Torres) dressed in long sleeveless black capes and nude cropped pants moving through Karl Jenkins’ “Palladio.” Mental images of De Beers commercials quickly flashed in my mind, but retreated. These men were as durable as diamonds, but they caressed the stage with liquid strength and agility, lifting each other in arabesque-like positions and pushing their hands up and out as if they were offering themselves to the audience and something higher. Stein Flujt, as the latest to lose his manliness, showed compassion and thoughtfulness; he moved softly yet with a deep determination. Duato’s choreography showed these men as that: men. Even when castrated, they had their brawn, and they were a force to be reckoned with.

With sweeping backdrops by Walter Nobbe, Duato’s softer, more introspective “Rassemblement” explores slavery and resistance through Toto Bissainthe’s Haitian music and song, but it didn’t have the same force that the other two did. Slavery is a touchy subject, and to have mainly white people dancing about it is, well, ironic and hard to swallow. And yet to watch these dancers portray slaves, their feelings of resistance, their attempts to reject the ways of their captors and spin what is given to them into something of their very own: that held its own unique power unto itself. The final product, performed by Ana María López, Kayoko Everhart, Yolanda Martín, África Guzmán, Francisco Lorenzo, Mathieu Rouvière, Joel Toledo, and Isaac Montllor (with cameos by Gentian Doda and Fabrice Edelmann), weaved together a dramatic display of heart and fortitude.

Nacho Duato choreographs in big, bold gestures and it’s not something that can be ignored. His fervent success has been heard around the globe, and I hope it echoes here for many years to come.

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So two dancers walked into a barre...


Last edited by RaHir on Fri Feb 22, 2008 1:20 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 11:30 am 
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Location: San Francisco
Spanish dance Compañía heavy handed
Rachel Howard, Chronicle Dance Correspondent
Friday, February 22, 2008
Quote:
The poet Allen Grossman once wrote that a poem is about something the way a cat is about a house. No such equivocations needed with the choreography of Spaniard Nacho Duato. Duato's dances are each unabashedly, insistently about something - he may set a new standard for the term programmatic.

The notes accompanying his Compañía Nacional de Danza's opening Wednesday at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Theater told us that his "Rassemblement" is about Haitian history and human rights, that his "White Darkness" is about "the world of drugs and the effect they can have on our social behavior." What the cleverest program note can't do, though, is make those ideas manifest in movement.

There was little in this first of two slates presented by San Francisco Performances (Program B opens Saturday) to suggest why Duato has become one of the ballet world's most sought-after choreographers, or why the Bay Area debut of the troupe he took over in 1990 should attract an eager and full audience of local dance dignitaries. I suppose I can understand the reasons for the standing ovation: With its balletic stretch married to modern dance weightedness, its sweeping legs and twitchily fast, sculpted shapes, Duato's style offers an immediately appealing busyness and bombast. His muscular dancers look great doing it.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 11:34 am 
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Location: San Francisco
Compania Nacional de Danza brings physically daring works to San Francisco
The Contra Costa Times
Ann Murphy

Quote:
If it was a perfect night for an eclipse -- and those who crawled out around 9 p.m. say it was -- it was no less perfect an evening for dance from Spain. At Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Wednesday in San Francisco, luminousness flowed from the stage as the contemporary Compania Nacional de Danza made its San Francisco debut in three physically daring works on themes of violence and addiction and the irrepressibility of beauty.

Although this is the company's first trip to the city, dancegoers may be familiar with the work of director Nacho Duato from his time at Nederlands Dans Theater.

Lured to the Dutch company by director Jiri Kylian in 1981, the native Valencian spent his next nine years refining his movement idiom, ultimately serving as resident choreographer for the troupe.

More than two decades later, his style contains echoes not only the work of Kylian and Nederlands Dans Theater's other resident choreographer, the probing Hans van Manen. It also has hints of Alvin Ailey style, which he studied as a young man in New York, and of the comic grotesque classicism evident in some work by the Cullberg Ballet of Sweden, where Duato danced in 1980.

The result is a kind of polyglot language with roots deep in early modern dance, shapes that have the heft of European expressionism made anxious by the ruptures of postmodernism. Add to that ballet's scalpel-sharp clarity and soaring loft, and the results, even when not wholly successful, are as
sensuous and mysterious as a full moon following an eclipse.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 12:54 pm 
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Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 223
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Thanks a lot RaHir for your interesting review and for covering the CND performances in San Francisco :)

I love very much this company as well as Nacho's works, mainly that pieces from the past as the ones you had the opportunity to enjoy.

I think that there is an error in the name of one of the dancers, it's not África López but África Guzmán :roll: a very nice dancer who left to joint the NDT but came back as it also did Clyde Archer who joined the Cullberg and came back also to Madrid this season. And I'm very happy about, I like them both very much :D

Nacho Duato has premiered a new work in Barcelona, if you are interested in reading about and in seeing the gorgeous photos of Jesús Vallinas you can do it here there is also an interview to Nacho. You can see Clyde in a worderful jump and also a very nice África in a "Pas de Deux" in the piece of Jiri Kyllian "Wings of wax".

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To know more about ballet and dance in Spain you can visit "http://balletymas.com/" web page with some articles also in English


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 1:19 pm 
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Location: San Francisco
You're right! It's África Guzmán. There was an error in the program. Thanks!

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2008 12:44 pm 
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Posts: 12280
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Seattle press reviews of the company's performances at the University of Washington's Meany Hall, Thursday through Saturday, February 28 through March 1. A single program was presented at all performances: "Castrati," "Gnawa" and "White Darkness."

Stacey Levine in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer:

Seattle P-I

Moira Macdonald in the Seattle Times:

Seattle Times


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 23, 2008 10:53 pm 
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Location: SF Bay Area
The dancers looked absolutely gorgeous and the movements in the choreography were sensually appealing.

But, having more than a few Duato pieces, I left wondering if there was anything new I had experience. It all looked the same, one ballet after another looking just like yesteryear's...


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