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 Post subject: Peter Boal
PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2003 10:37 am 
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Location: SF Bay Area
Quote:
So Who's in Charge? Not the Choreographer

By SUSAN REITER, NY Times

ONE could say that Peter Boal is living out many dancers' fantasy when he performs at the Joyce Theater this week. Rather than being the dancer who is asked by a choreographer to perform in a piece, he was the one doing the asking, selecting three choreographers to create new solo works for him.
<a href=http://www.nytimes.com/2003/01/05/arts/dance/05REIT.html target=_blank>More</a>


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 Post subject: Re: Peter Boal
PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2003 12:49 am 
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Location: SF Bay Area
Deborah Jowitt in the Village Voice:

Quote:
Having danced a solo Wendy Perron made for him in 1993, he's now moonlighting, not just in showy pas de deux, but in the realm of postmodern dance.
<a href=http://www.villagevoice.com/issues/0304/jowitt.php target=_blank>More</a>, in the second item of the linked article.

Any thoughts about moving this to the Modern forum?


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 Post subject: Re: Peter Boal
PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2003 2:37 am 
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
No need Azlan - contrary to what some people dream about, the barriers between the dance styles are coming down fast.


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 Post subject: Re: Peter Boal
PostPosted: Wed Mar 10, 2004 10:43 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
Upcoming: Peter Boal & Company

By TOBI TOBIAS
The Village Voice
March 10 - 16, 2004

Ever since he played a luminous boy prince in Balanchine's Nutcracker at 12, the New York City Ballet's Peter Boal, now 38, has been a paragon of classicism. Both his stellar dancing and his teaching of the School of American Ballet's rising generation are lessons in purity, exactitude, and refinement.
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 Post subject: Re: Peter Boal
PostPosted: Wed Mar 10, 2004 12:54 pm 
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Location: SF Bay Area
It seems that Peter Boal has been dancing a lot outside of NYCB. Besides this company, he's also guested for Suzanne Farrell among others.


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 Post subject: Re: Peter Boal
PostPosted: Sun Mar 14, 2004 12:24 pm 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
In Baryshnikov's Footsteps

By JENNIFER DUNNING
The New York Times
March 14, 2004

As a leading dancer with the New York City Ballet, Peter Boal is widely acknowledged as one of the great classicists of his generation. But he is also known for his risky explorations of unfamiliar dance. With Twyla Tharp's "Pergolesi," which he will perform with his chamber ballet group this week at the Joyce Theater, Mr. Boal is reaching ever further.
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<small>[ 24 March 2004, 07:28 AM: Message edited by: kurinuku ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Peter Boal
PostPosted: Mon Mar 15, 2004 3:28 am 
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Location: Florence
Peter Boal and his group is schedulede in Venice Biennale Dance Festival, Italy , next July. The ad of the 2004 festival is Karole Armitage.


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 Post subject: Re: Peter Boal
PostPosted: Wed Mar 24, 2004 6:31 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
A City Ballet Quartet, Branching Out

By ANNA KISSELGOFF
The New York Times
March 18, 2004

Peter Boal & Company, which made its debut with four fabulous dancers from New York City Ballet at the Joyce Theater, offered a spring breeze in a snowstorm on Tuesday night.

Superb works by Twyla Tharp and William Forsythe looked fresh in a new context, and two minor premieres, by John Alleyne and Marco Goecke, a German newcomer, kept the eye engaged.
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 Post subject: Re: Peter Boal
PostPosted: Thu Mar 25, 2004 6:23 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
Venturing Out

By DEBORAH JOWITT
The Village Voice
March 23, 2004

A principal dancer at the New York City Ballet, Peter Boal also teaches full-time at the School of American Ballet and has adventured into performing solos by such decidedly unclassical choreographers as Molissa Fenley and Wendy Perron.
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 Post subject: Re: Peter Boal
PostPosted: Sat Mar 27, 2004 12:28 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
ARTS: Peter Boal & Co Joyce Theater, New York

By HILARY OSTLERE
The Financial Times
March 26, 2004

Peter Boal is a superb classical dancer who has lived his professional life in the aura of George Balanchine's New York City Ballet.
...
Twenty years on, Boal is a dancer of perfect line whose classical technique and insight into each role has allowed him to become the definitive Apollo,...
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 Post subject: Re: Peter Boal
PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2004 1:16 am 
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
A New Pergolesi
By Laura Shapiro for New York Metro

Back in that brief, shining moment when Twyla Tharp was making dances for Mikhail Baryshnikov, everything she choreographed for him was also about him. Tharp is a master at making the best use of the materials at hand, and in Baryshnikov she had the material she had been waiting for all her life: He was the ultimate ballet-trained male dancer, and at the same time, he had a chameleonic physical brilliance that enabled him to dance his way into the unique, profoundly demanding style she had developed for her own company.

click for more


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 Post subject: Re: Peter Boal
PostPosted: Sun Aug 08, 2004 7:37 am 
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Location: SF Bay Area
Peter Boal brings his new company to Jacob's Pillow:

Quote:
A real trouper
New York City Ballet principal Peter Boal forms his own company for the off-season


By TRESCA WEINSTEIN, Special to the Albany Times Union

What do you do with your time off when you're a principal with the New York City Ballet, a full-time faculty member at the School of American Ballet, a guest artist for companies as diverse as the Metropolitan Opera and the Wendy Perron Dance Company and -- last but not least -- a father of three? <a href=http://www.timesunion.com/AspStories/story.asp?storyID=272976&category=ARTS&BCCode=HOME&newsdate=8/5/2004 target=_blank>more</a>


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 Post subject: Re: Peter Boal
PostPosted: Sun Aug 22, 2004 11:59 am 
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Location: Southwick, MA, USA
Peter Boal & Company at Jacob's Pillow

Program: Herman Schmerman, Mopey, Variations, Op. 30, and Mesmerics

During an interlude of silence in Marco Goecke’s piece, dancer Sean Suozzi’s crouching posture - a stretched archaic pattern of legs flat beneath the twisted and shirtless upper body that turned the dancer’s shoulders and gaze towards the audience- mimicked, one mused, the lurking Grendel’s black mood. And, if by chance this moment were Kodak captured, one fancied that Grendel’s mother affectionately labeled the snap shot, Mopey.

Given its somber lighting and its at once self-absorbed and self-flagellating movement, Goecke’s Mopey illustrates the misery of the godforsaken. Half naked, back typically to the audience, obsessive self-hugging, flailing chest-beating arms, face kneading fists, and ape-like movements suggest a malediction of extreme dejection. Silences, however, structurally tidy and unify the busy sufferings manifest in Mopey into a work with a beginning, middle, and end. And the musical links -a rousing piece for cello and orchestra by C. P. E. Bach and a corrosive piece of rock n’ roll by the fittingly named Cramps -that bridge the silent beginning and to the silent middle and the middle to the silent and exhausted end, however, neither calm nor incite the self-destructive fury of Mopey’s savage beast. In fact, save for its rhythms, the choreography ignored the music – a cheerless world indeed. And one that aptly ends in darkness. Still, silent, standing, and wearied (perhaps by the prophecy held within a returning one arm gesture –the arm Beowulf rips off) the character of Mopey looks into the offending light above him then nosily blows it out.

Mopey, the one work in the program of four given by Peter Boal & Company at Jacob’s Pillow about or perhaps the only one with soul followed Herman Schmerman, choreographed by William Forsythe. Subtitled pas de deux, and performed by Peter Boal and Wendy Whelan, the pedestrian and dismissive humor of Forsythe’s title meant, one thinks, to sweeten his soulless experiment in physics. Set to a score by Thom Willems, titled Just Ducky, the hollowness generated by the sustained extremes of bass and treble pitches suggested neither justness nor duckiness but rather the vastness of space. And, the squips, pops, and stuttering rhythmic patterns that wended their way through various timbral treatments divided the musical space into layers; layers that glued the jointed-ness of the choreography together. Bent bodies, broken or flexed limbs, feet, and wrists, and limbs or head or body that circled around either an internal or external axis radiated clusters of independent rhythmic pulses out into the accommodating but indifferent space of music. The subdued and minimal partnering, including lifts plus the ‘feet firmly on the ground’ sense of balance account, one thinks, for the pulsating rather than a streaming flow of movement and hence Herman Schmerman’s rather static quality.

Although very different in sound and look, Variations, Opus 30, choreographed by Balanchine to the eponymous work by von Webern shares with Herman Schmerman highly polished moments or pulses generated from entwining lines. And as if to balance the music-movement relationship in Forsythe’s piece, in Variations it is the choreography rather than the music that glues the piece together. As there are more rests in Webern’s music than notes, that his compositions derive from the manipulation of tone-rows typically twisted beyond recognition, and that the sounds, orchestral in this case, of the moments can vary considerably in their timbral mix, the musical fabric of his works can feel frayed, ratty or moth-eaten even. Seeing Sean Suozzi, whether still, standing, and with arms and hands held in the mudra of the Golden God from Bayadere or performing Balanchine’s ‘jumping soccer kick’ provided Variations, a solo originally meant for Paul Taylor and part of a larger work titled Episodes, a discernable and welcome continuity.

Christopher Wheeldon’s Mesmerics set to music arranged or composed for string quartet by Philip Glass aptly closed the evening by recapitulating noticeable features of its program mates. Mesmerics, for example, shares Mopey’s cave- like atmosphere and Herman Schmerman’s focus on twisting, particularly the arm swing driven oscillations of the upper body. Wheeldon’s work opens in the dim light of a cloudy sunset as two figures, Peter Boal and Benjamin Millepied, sway in unison yet fixed in profile and in place. Additionally, silence as in Mopey structures Mesmerics. Boal and Millepied, for instance, sway in silence until Wendy Whelan enters bearing music. The music she bears is a short cue for string quartet composed by Glass for the film, Mishima. The silence/music (always the same cue and dance phrase) sequence repeats three times; an added fourth silence, however, ends the first part, which instances, one thinks, the drowsiness implied by the title. Although the partnering (Millepied vanished) in this section recalls Agon, the relationships between the three dancers particularly in the finale section were more architectural, a feature shared with Herman Schmerman, than human. And while all of the pieces on the program involved the drama of rolling or squatting on the floor and twisting and turning whether on the ground or in the air, Mesmerics was like Webern’s music a range of field stones gathered into a rows: texturally busy but more monumental than moving. And the finale of Mesmerics, set to an intense main title cue composed by Glass for the film, Secret Agent, was perhaps the most stone cold and least moving of all.


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 Post subject: Re: Peter Boal
PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2005 11:18 am 
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Location: SF Bay Area
Quote:
MR. INTEGRITY

Tobi Tobias
Arts Journal

At the end of the 2005 spring season, the New York City Ballet’s Peter Boal will retire from the company (and its affiliate, the School of American Ballet, where he has been a leading instructor) to become Artistic Director of Seattle’s Pacific Northwest Ballet. <a href=http://www.artsjournal.com/tobias/archives20050101.shtml#95255 target=_blank>more</a>


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 Post subject: Re: Peter Boal
PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2005 5:06 pm 
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Location: Seattle, WA USA
I read ealier in this forum that Peter Boal and Dancers will appear at the Venice Biennale in July, 2005. Is that still correct? Does anyone know? ;)


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