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 Post subject: Re: Music for dance
PostPosted: Sun Jul 07, 2002 11:00 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 22, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 17498
Location: SF Bay Area
More on Philip Glass:<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>'Galileo' journeys to the stars<BR>By TOM STRINI<BR>Milwaukee Journal Sentinel<P>Chicago - The obvious strategy for Philip Glass or anyone composing an opera about Galileo would be to play up the intrigues of the church bureaucracy and the personal anguish surrounding Galileo's persecution by the Inquisition.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><a href=http://www.jsonline.com/onwisconsin/arts/jun02/55190.asp target=_blank>More</a>


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 Post subject: Re: Music for dance
PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2002 1:15 pm 
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Posts: 591
Quote:
Symphony to Premiere Musical Works

WASHINGTON (AP) - The National Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Leonard Slatkin will perform the world premiere of two musical works based on dance at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on Thursday. more


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 Post subject: Re: Music for dance
PostPosted: Fri Oct 25, 2002 1:08 pm 
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Joined: Sat Aug 03, 2002 11:01 pm
Posts: 591
In the Boston Herald:

Quote:
Glass defies convention in scores

Classical/by T.J. Medrek

For at least a couple of centuries, the model of composer-conductor has held powerful sway over classical music. Think of the romanticized image of a completely deaf Beethoven leading the world premiere of his Ninth Symphony (granted, with a little help). Think, more recently, of the recorded legacies of Igor Stravinsky, Benjamin Britten and Leonard Bernstein conducting their own music - or of John Williams and Andre Previn regularly leading compositions of their own today. more


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 Post subject: Re: Music for dance
PostPosted: Fri Oct 25, 2002 11:34 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 20, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 3000
Location: San Francisco
To me, Glass's music is tolerable as dance music, but nothing more.

I get the feeling there aren't many people who post in this forum who are familiar with the Alwin Nikolais Dance Theater, but I've made many references to it because I thought Nikolais consistently created the best dance/theater I've seen. He composed his own electronic scores, which I always enjoyed very much as part of his dance pieces, but I don't think they would necessarily stand well on their own, nor were they meant to. Rather, his music was on an equal footing with the choreography, costumes, sets and lighting.

<small>[ 10-26-2002, 01:35: Message edited by: djb ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Music for dance
PostPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2002 8:13 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 12, 1999 12:01 am
Posts: 3663
Location: The Bronx is up; the Battery's down
Glass's music gives me a pain; there are clearly better composers.

<small>[ 10-26-2002, 10:46: Message edited by: salzberg ]</small>

_________________
Jeffrey E. Salzberg,
Dance Lighting Design
http://www.jeffsalzberg.com


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 Post subject: Re: Music for dance
PostPosted: Sun Oct 27, 2002 1:55 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 22, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 17498
Location: SF Bay Area
Here's a quote from ewayne's post from a thread in Ballet:

Quote:
San Francisco Ballet 2002 Program 1 (All-Robbins)

"Marie, While Glass's music can at times seem like a haven from the overwrought noise that passes as creative music, and at least it does have a beat (and you can dance to it Dick, I'll give it a 85!), it is also highly repetitive on purpose. Unfortunately Glass has found a formula and he's sticking to it by god, no matter how dulled our senses are from it.
You see, what Glass does is, You see, what Glass does is,You see, what Glass does is,You see, what Glass does is,You see, what Glass does is, he uses repetition You see, what Glass does is,You see, what Glass does is,You see, what Glass does is,You see, what Glass does is, he uses repetition to dull your senses You see, what Glass does is,You see, what Glass does is,You see, what Glass does is, You see, what Glass does is,You see, what Glass does is,You see, what Glass does is, he uses repetition to dull your senses into a state where you crave the smallest subtlest change like a starving man craves food. You see, what Glass does is,You see, what Glass does is,You see, what Glass does is,You see, what Glass does is,You see, what Glass does is, (annoyed yet? get the point?)"
<a href=http://forum.criticaldance.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=4;t=001265;p=2 target=_blank>More</a>


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 Post subject: Re: Music for dance
PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2003 6:57 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 22, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 17498
Location: SF Bay Area
Quote:
Dance's Musical Heartbeat

By JENNIFER DUNNING
NY Times

George Balanchine wanted to create ballets, he once said, in which you could see the music and hear the dance. <a href=http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/06/arts/dance/06DANC.html target=_blank>more</a>


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