public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Mon Sep 22, 2014 8:22 pm

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 136 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 ... 10  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Flamenco
PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2002 8:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 921
Location: US
<B>Keeping the Flame of Flamenco</B><BR>Article in the NY Times By Valerie Gladstone<P>MADRID -- THE flamenco dancer Eva La Yerbabuena performed here unexpectedly in November at a fund- raiser for children in India at the Colegio Oficial de Médicos. As the mother of a 7-year-old daughter, she wanted to participate, even though she was given only 10 minutes to perform, on a makeshift stage, between a comedy act and a musical act. Still, a huge crowd turned up to see her.<P><A HREF="http://www.nytimes.com/2002/01/27/arts/dance/27GLAD.html" TARGET=_blank><B>click for more</B></A>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Flamenco
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2002 6:42 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
From the Boston Globe:

Virtuosity and ferocity at flamenco festival

By Christine Temin, Globe Staff, 1/29/2002

Quote:
World Music's four-day flamenco festival climaxed on Sunday with a 10-minute standing ovation for Antonio Canales, one of the great artists in his field. The buildup to Canales also generated excitement. Originally there were to have been four performances in the festival. A fifth, on Saturday afternoon, was added at the last minute to accommodate ticket demand. Every seat was sold for every performance.

This weekend's event was World Music's third flamenco series, and this time it was devoted to Andalucia, the region in southern Spain where flamenco was born. Like ballet, it was first performed by amateurs; by the 1840s, though, flamenco had started to become the province of pros.
This link is now broken.

<small>[ 12-08-2002, 17:58: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Flamenco
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2002 7:36 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 921
Location: US
<B>Flamenco Dares the Unpredictable</B><BR>Article in the NY Times By Anna Kisselgoff<P>It was not your everyday flamenco dance festival in New York. There was a deliberate mix of the experimental and the traditional. <P>Israel Galván dazzled with his startling Cubist silhouette. María Pagés channeled her Riverdance experience and serpentine style into a crowd-pleasing piece with pop music. Manuela Carrasco, imposing and superlative as always, and El Güito, pure and disciplined, were the Gypsy veterans. Antonio Canales and his company concentrated on flashy footwork in a pop format. Eva Yerbabuena, a revelation like Mr. Galván, fused her filigreed virtuosity with contemporary music. <P><A HREF="http://www.nytimes.com/2002/01/29/arts/dance/29CANA.html" TARGET=_blank><B>click for more</B></A><BR>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Flamenco
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2002 2:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jun 11, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 4753
Location: Montreal, QC, Canada
MARCIA B. SIEGEL - Boston Phoenix, January 31-February 7, 2002:<BR> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><B>Traditions old and new</B><BR>Flamenco dancers Eva Yerbabuena and Antonio Canales; Nicola Hawkins<P>The show on Thursday and Friday nights by Ballet Flamenco Eva Yerbabuena had the feeling of a continuous modern-dance concert. <P>SUNDAY AFTERNOON’S CONCERT by Antonio Canales and his company was, I thought, more traditional, but very spontaneous and outgoing. <P>Hawkins used modern-dance staging to suggest a tradition that hasn’t been invented yet.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><B>more...</B><P>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Flamenco
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2002 6:14 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
From the Chicago Sun Times:

COMPAGNIA ESPANOLA DE ANTONIO MARQUEZ

AT THE CHICAGO THEATRE

Quote:
Last, but by no means least, was the Compagnia Espanola De Antonio Marquez, which drew a huge crowd to the Chicago Theatre on Saturday night, and magically transformed that vast house into the next best thing to an intimate flamenco club in the heart of Seville.
This link is now broken.

<small>[ 12-08-2002, 17:59: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Flamenco
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2002 6:32 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
From the Los Angeles Times:<P><B>Moments of Fiery Flamenco Can't Save Disjointed 'Cielo'</B><P>By VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, Special to The Times<P><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>In one of the odder attempts at an evening-length flamenco dance-theater piece (think fusion), "Al Cielo con Ella" (Toward Heaven With Her), under dancer-choreographer Abigail Caro's artistic direction, misfired Friday in the first of three weekend performances at Santa Monica's Morgan-Wixon Theatre. At times it seemed more like flamenco meets the Fillmore, with Jimi Hendrix-type electric guitar noodlings--albeit technically bright--emanating from the ax of Miroslav Tadic as he cranked out the late rocker's classic "The Wind Cries Mary."<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><BR><A HREF="http://www.calendarlive.com/top/1,1419,L-LATimes-Search-X!ArticleDetail-51635,00.html?search_area=Blended&channel=Search&search_text=%22Dance+Review%22" TARGET=_blank><B>MORE...</B></A><BR>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Flamenco
PostPosted: Mon Mar 04, 2002 5:37 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 921
Location: US
Jennifer Dunning writes in the NY Times:<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>ENGLEWOOD, N.J., Feb. 28 — A casual observer might have been forgiven for wondering if a Presidential State of the Union speech were in progress here on Thursday night at the John Harms Center for the Arts, given the frequency with which the audience rose to its feet to applaud. The occasion was a performance by the Compañía Española de Antonio Márquez, a Spanish flamenco troupe that knows how to put on a good show. <P>The evening was unusual in that it featured ensemble dancing, with Mr. Márquez.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/04/arts/dance/04MARQ.html" TARGET=_blank><B>Click for More</B></A>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Flamenco
PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2002 7:18 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 22, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 17498
Location: SF Bay Area
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Troupe captures different flavors of flamenco<P>Mary Ellen Hunt, Contra Costa Times<P>Flamenco of an American flavor and spanning a variety of styles from traditional to modern is the star of "Entrádas," the show Carolina Lugo's Brisas de España opened at the Eureka Theater in San Francisco last week.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><a href=http://www.bayarea.com/mld/cctimes/living/3662806.htm target=_blank>More</a>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Flamenco
PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2002 9:56 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 407
Location: Where little cable cars climb halfway to the stars
<B>“Entradas,” Carolina Lugo’s Brisas de España Dance Company. Eureka Theatre, San Francisco, July 11-21, 2002</B><P>Carolina Lugo is a continuator of the flamenco traditions established by Lola Montes in the early 1950s, derivative of Spanish courtly dance and the Flamenco popularized in Spain by the dancer La Argentina, with whom the renowned musician, Manuel de Falla, chose to collaborate.<P>The troupe Ms. Lugo has assembled includes herself, her daughter Carolé Acuña, singer and dancer, Roberto Zamora, a corps of three dancers and an apprentice, and guitarists, Daniel Fríes, Sasha Nakra, and Dimitri. As an ensemble, they succeed as ambassadors authentic Spanish dance. The interplay between the musicians and the “jaleo” (clapping time) of the dancers makes for a loose, but warm weave of contrapuntal rhythms, as seamlessly, the dancers wend their steps into the rhythms, building to a sizzling intensity with the guitar crescendos. The program is divided into two parts, where different styles of dances are shown. As each part opens, we are never exactly sure when the performance begins, as the musicians and dancers call to each other, and the guitars start to tune with the clapping, and before we know it, out of the melée comes precision dancing with the jolie-laide face of Ms. Lugo as the company’s divining rod. <P>The younger women dancers have not yet achieved Ms. Lugo’s weathered look, and are appropriately the “majas” for which this dance form is famous. We cannot help but be dazzled by the intensity of their beauty, enriched by the concentration of their attention on each other and the audience as they execute their musical steps. The costumes were given to Ms. Lugo when her mentor, Lola Montes, dissolved her own company.<P>Into the mix of sonorous guitar, jaleo, castanets, and rich vibrato voice textures, are small offerings of balletic choreography: soutenue turns, arabesque, ronds de jambe, sprightly grand jetés, and tour jetés, performed with perhaps less turnout than we are accustomed to seeing in classical ballet, but with a vivid quality that is not always present on the classical stage. All of it works together, showing us how dance and music came from the same divine source before the orchestra was seated below the stage, or presented recorded on tape or CD. Reuniting the dancers with their musicians on the stage has the beneficial impact of making the audience feel that they are in a more intimate relationship with both. Imagine the feeling of this dance in a cabaret or even a café setting, where the audience, musicians and dancers are on a more or less equal plane!<P>See this accomplished troupe—for the history, richness, costumes, high definition dancing and haunting music, as well as for the texture and color of Spanish folklorico. You will leave the theater completely enchanted!<P><BR>[This message has been edited by Toba Singer (edited July 15, 2002).]<p>[This message has been edited by Toba Singer (edited July 15, 2002).]

_________________
"Live your life as an exclamation, not an explanation!" Eddie Izzard


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Flamenco
PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2002 2:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 8612
Location: El Granada, CA, USA
From the Examiner on the same performance.

Quote:
More fizzle than sizzle
BY RACHEL HOWARD
Examiner Dance Critic

Carolina Lugo, artistic director of the East Bay's Brisas de Espana, is not in their league. She is not a beautiful woman, and though she has experience and exalted training (with Lola Montes) on her side, her frame is now not just womanly but heavy. Duende, that flamenco quality of channeling the dance's spirit, sparks in her eyes time and again, yet she doesn't have that mastery of mood modulating that makes the best flamenco performances riveting.
This link is now broken.

<small>[ 12-08-2002, 18:00: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Flamenco
PostPosted: Mon Aug 12, 2002 5:26 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
From the Los Angeles Times:

Festival Opens With Passion
Flamenco artists exhibit complex, dazzling footwork in a series of solo performances


By LEWIS SEGAL , TIMES STAFF WRITER

Quote:
Oppressive pain, heroic defiance, percussive footwork as a tribal drum: The annual New World Flamenco Festival opened with primal statements of traditional Spanish Gypsy culture over the weekend at the Irvine Barclay Theatre.

In a 90-minute program of solos performed without intermission, Compañía Juana Amaya of Seville focused on the tension between showpiece virtuosity and emotional expression. Indeed, on Saturday, Amaya sometimes gave the impression of being forced to dance when she'd rather have been off sobbing in a corner somewhere.

Her opening "Seguiriyas" solo in particular used abrupt switches of position and pressure to portray a woman undone by uncontrollable feelings.
This link is now broken.

<small>[ 12-08-2002, 18:01: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Flamenco
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2002 8:36 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jun 11, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 4753
Location: Montreal, QC, Canada
Lisa Smedman - Vancouver Courier, August 28, 2002:
Quote:
Flamenco fest steps onto the Drive

It might be a flamenco dance class anywhere in the world, but one element firmly sets it in Vancouver: the instructor at the front of the class is Chinese-Canadian.

Kasandra Lea-who uses just her first name as a stage name-discovered flamenco seven years ago. Swept up by the passion of the dance form, she embarked on pilgrimages to study with dance masters in Madrid, Seville and Jerez de la Frontera, the "birthplace of flamenco."
more...


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Flamenco
PostPosted: Fri Nov 08, 2002 6:38 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Flamenco dancing comes to Booth Hill
By Patricia Villers for The New Haven Register


SHELTON — More than 200 Booth Hill School students got a flavor of flamenco Wednesday from Jose R. Ramos and Julissa Candenillas of New York City.
Candenillas, garbed in a colorful, floral print dress, danced on stage in the gym as Ramos accompanied her on guitar.

"Has anyone ever seen flamenco before?" she asked. About five children raised their hands.

"It originated in Spain. It's a way of life ... it has roots in Roman, Moorish, Jewish and Gypsy
musical influences," Candenillas said.

"Flamenco" means "multi-colored garment" in Spanish, she told the students. It includes 30
different styles of songs, defined by geographical and rhythmic characteristics, she said.

She alternately used a black lace shawl, castanets and a blue fan to tell a story in seven dance demonstrations. She tapped her feet lightly in some dances and stomped them vigorously in others.

click for more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Flamenco
PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2002 8:53 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
From the Los Angeles Times:

Spirited solos drive flamenco

By Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer

Quote:
Once a few curious lapses are remedied, the six-week, Wednesdays-only Cuadro Flamenco series at the Fountain Theatre (through Dec. 18) promises to provide an ideally intimate and varied overview of local contemporary flamenco style.
This link is now broken.

<small>[ 12-08-2002, 18:03: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Flamenco
PostPosted: Sun Dec 08, 2002 5:03 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Flamenco dancing comes to Booth Hill
By Patricia Villers for The New Haven Register


SHELTON — More than 200 Booth Hill School students got a flavor of flamenco Wednesday from Jose R. Ramos and Julissa Candenillas of New York City.
Candenillas, garbed in a colorful, floral print dress, danced on stage in the gym as Ramos accompanied her on guitar.

"Has anyone ever seen flamenco before?" she asked. About five children raised their hands.

"It originated in Spain. It's a way of life ... it has roots in Roman, Moorish, Jewish and Gypsy musical influences," Candenillas said.

"Flamenco" means "multi-colored garment" in Spanish, she told the students. It includes 30 different styles of songs, defined by geographical and rhythmic characteristics, she said.

She alternately used a black lace shawl, castanets and a blue fan to tell a story in seven dance demonstrations. She tapped her feet lightly in some dances and stomped them vigorously in others.

click for more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 136 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 ... 10  Next

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group