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 Post subject: Kunst-Stoff
PostPosted: Sun Apr 30, 2000 9:25 pm 
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Location: SF Bay Area
Here is an interesting performance trilogy by Kunst-Stoff that takes place in three different spaces. The audience is herded through the three spaces and is also given soap bubbles to blow.

There is also a segment in the show that makes fun of ballet...
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/200 0/04/29/DD95248.DTL&type=performance

[This message has been edited by Azlan (edited May 01, 2000).]

<small>[ 15 May 2004, 12:46 PM: Message edited by: Azlan ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Kunst-Stoff
PostPosted: Sun Apr 30, 2000 9:36 pm 
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Location: SF Bay Area
Image <BR>Nostalgia 3000 Poster<P><BR>Very interesting group. Check out their website at<BR> <A HREF="http://www.kunst-stoff.org/" TARGET=_blank>http://www.kunst-stoff.org/</A>


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 Post subject: Re: Kunst-Stoff
PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2001 9:29 pm 
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Location: SF Bay Area
A beautifully written article that explores the development of this fascinating company:<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><B>A tale of two dancers</B><P>Rachel Howard, SF Examiner<P> Yannis Adoniou and Tomi Paasonen met as teenage dance students at Germany's Hamburg Ballet. They fell in love at once, and their relationship lasted seven years. They performed together, painted together, made dances together, even though, navigating separate dance careers throughout Europe, they often lived apart.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://63.78.169.150/ex_files/default.jsp?story=X0416KUNST2" TARGET=_blank><B>More</B></A>


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 Post subject: Re: Kunst-Stoff
PostPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2002 1:01 pm 
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From Magic and mirroring in Kunst-Stoff program by Octavio Roca, San Francisco Chronicle:

Quote:
With not a lot of fanfare, some of the most original dance or drama in town is happening at ODC Theater with what amounts to a birthday party for Kunst-Stoff. This stuff is hard to categorize, but it makes for one impressive spectacle.
more...


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 Post subject: Re: Kunst-Stoff
PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2002 1:22 pm 
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Location: Where little cable cars climb halfway to the stars
Kunst-Stoff’s Fifth Anniversary Home Season, October 24, 25 and 26, 2002, ODC Theater

Kunst-Stoff is eclectic and so are the dancers who have collected around it over the past five years. In part, a spin-off from Lines Contemporary Ballet Company, and in part, having grown a bit like a pick-up company, there is now a solid core of tested cadre who dance the works of its artistic directors Yannis Adoniou and Tomi Paasonen. They show an impassioned commitment to experimentation and exploration.

Thursday evening’s program included three works, all of them dark, introspective and demanding. The first, “Numerous aXidents per(formed)” opens with Nicole Bonadonna tucked into the marley covering ODC’s famous and cherished wood flooring. She slips in and out and in and out and finally out, in a kind of birthing sequence. A microphone is the alternative pole on this set, and dancers step up to it to say a few words that punctuate movement set to synthesized water dripping or circuits being completed or thunder clapping. Adoniou is the choreographer who created this microcosm where dancers are free to birth improvisational work without losing their engagement with each other or the audience.

Directed by Tomi Passonen, “W” is narrower, yet more ambitious, in that it is almost a clinical exploration of narcissistic projection—literally and figuratively. Guest performer, Kevin Cregan, of Dutch National Ballet Company, paces his way downstage, and thanks to screened images and superimposed live video projection of Cregan, a montage of his personae becomes the set. The medium is not only the message here: It is the performer, the set and marks the music for the dancer. The program says, “Your perception of me is a projection of yourself on me as I see myself in you seeing yourself in the ocean of my eye, so who’s looking at whom here and what do you see as we look, or is it just me being you double me? A play with you, me, four eyes, two lenses, all of you and the beam in between.” And most dancers can just manage to remember their own roles, and maybe their partner’s! Imagine the challenge of not knowing for certain which of the images is the one the audience takes in as you dance! Adoniou joins Cregan and they dance a duet that adds to the solid geometry. The work they do invites a warm response from the audience. As the piece goes on, it begins, like ice floes, to lose the energy that initially set it up. This is not because of a default on the part of the dancers or the cameraperson and projectionist, Perry Hallinan and Katy Kavanagh (all were completely on task). It simply went too long, and so lost momentum by the time it concluded.

The last piece, “Yia Yia” is reminiscence by Adoniou based on the life of, and dedicated to, his late grandmother. “Yia Yia” is Greek for grandmother. The set opens with a kryptonite-like blue luminescent cube that suggests an Aegean motif. The grandmother figure is swathed in white like a character from a Greek tragedy, and carries a bouquet as she does a slow tour of the stage, finally settling upstage right. Drinking has been mimed to jazz, and a dancer begins to count to twenty in German. Two spots light the stage for a woman dancer and a man dancer, and then we have Kathleen Hermesdorf in red, whose solo shows every sinew of her amazingly supple and available body. She holds back nothing, and dances smoldering rings around herself with great energy and drama. A duet featuring Nicole Bonadonna and Kevin Cregan is also as powerful as it is stimulating, and as the music shifts from Chopin to Greek rebetiko, you can almost smell the retsina and might expect a Miserlou to emerge from the sustained upbeat tempo. I was a little disappointed when there was none. The episodes danced give us a memory of a woman’s life to carry with us.

There is lots of inscape and no escape in this program, and so the feeling at the end is like the feeling at the end of a heavy meal: So much to like, but then, so much also to digest.

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 Post subject: Re: Kunst-Stoff
PostPosted: Sat May 15, 2004 10:49 am 
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Location: SF Bay Area
Sounds like an adventure:

Quote:
Kunst-Stoff mixes film, speech, dance

Rachel Howard
SF Chronicle

You never know where the postmodern dance adventures of Kunst-Stoff might take you. <a href=http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2004/05/15/DDGGD6KRKS1.DTL target=_blank>more</a>


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 Post subject: Re: Kunst-Stoff
PostPosted: Wed May 26, 2004 6:22 am 
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Location: SF
From the San Francisco Bay Guardian,

Quote:
Lost control
Kunst-Stoff's courted chaos.
By Rita Felciano
Super Vision
TOMI PAASONEN DIDN'T take choreographic credit for Super Vision, the hour-long theatrical extravaganza that constituted the second half of Kunst-Stoff's sixth annual home season at ODC Theater.
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2006 2:52 pm 
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Location: San Francisco
Just a reminder that Kunst-stoff performs at Yerba Buena tonight and tomorrow night! I'll have a review up sometime tomorrow morning, but I still highly recommend checking it out:)


KUNST-STOFF`s new production "as we close their eyes", coming up February 10-11 as part of the Bay Area Now 4 Festival at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, has been named one of the top ten dance events to attend in 2006 by the <i>San Francisco Chronicle</i>.

Bay Area Now 4 presents KUNST-STOFF
"as we close their eyes" and "In-Sight"

Fri, Feb 10 & Feb 11, 2006, 8 pm Theater
$25 regular
$21 students, seniors & teachers
$18 YBCA Members

Yerba Buena Center for the Arts
701 Mission Street @ Third

To purchase advance tickets for the Bay Area Now 4 Festival featuring KUNST-STOFF call the YBCA box office, 415-978-2787.

they step in boldly, embracing a surrealism and a funky trashiness
they look at theaters as their visual playing field where anything goes.
<i>SF Bay Guardian</i>

http://www.kunst-stoff.org/

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 12:58 pm 
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Location: San Francisco
KUNST-OFF
Presented by Yerba Buena Center for the Arts
February 10, 2006


Yannis Adoniou’s KUNST-STOFF, a local dance-theater company, is known for their risk-taking and originality. But with all risk-taking, sometimes you get a bang and others a bust, and the ensemble’s two-day run at Yerba Buena kicked off last night with only a slight rumble.

The program opened with the world premiere of Adoniou‘s rough-around-the-edges “as we close their eyes” which was created through a partnership with The Lighthouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired. Examining the essence of “seeing,” the performers explored the perception of movement through sound, breath, touch, and text. One of the most poignant sections occurred during a duet for Kara Davis and Jose Campos. With impeccable timing, they supported and complemented each other through a series of various turns, lifts, and gestures. On stage, Sheldon B. Smith and Leslie Schickel accompanied them vocally, each providing their own verbal interpretation of what they saw. One might say “arabesque” while the other describes the moment as “lifts her leg,” proof that words, no matter how accurate, never quite paint a full and vivid picture, but that they also define what you do or not perceive to be happening. Other parts, such as the live camera work and sound-producing wire, though, cried out for more foresight and fleshing out, and the work overall felt underdeveloped.

More successful, however, was Adoniou’s “In-Sight,” which premiered in 2004. Displaying striking photography by Cara Judea Alhadeff, Adoniou continues to explore perspective, but this time through a more abstract manner than “as we close their eyes.” Again, what struck me was Adoniou’s intuitiveness into partnering. Here his creative juices, along with Jethrow DeHart’s pulsating sound score, flowed and excelled, and Adoniou pulled out little threads of rhythm and inspiration that he only hinted at in his group and solo choreography: more than his modern play on classic yet contorted ballet positions, greater and intricate positions, complex timing, a unexpected placement of a hand on the leg. The partnering displayed an attack of the actual movement, the in-betweens that we sometimes miss, the perspective of the dance. It’s this that propels “In-Sight” forward from concept to execution and above and beyond “as we close their eyes.”

Yannis Adoniou is on the right track. His ideas have merit, and he can obviously choreograph like no tomorrow. With more development, “as we close their eyes” could greatly succeed in helping to promote and expand our understanding of our senses and their ability to enhance our state of being, and these two works together would be a boom of an evening.

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 Post subject: Review from the SF Chronicle
PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2006 3:33 pm 
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Location: El Granada, CA, USA
Quote:
REVIEW
Adoniou dance imagines blindness

Rachel Howard, Special to The Chronicle

Monday, February 13, 2006

Yannis Adoniou has triumphed over many seemingly ill-advised concepts during the eight years in which Kunst-Stoff, the experimental company he co-founded with fellow choreographer Tomi Paasonen, has raced to the forefront of thought-provoking San Francisco dance. He has re-imagined "Les Sylphides" -- that icon of balletic romanticism -- as a 21st century horror story, and made Rene Magritte a poster boy for postmodernism.

Friday, during Kunst-Stoff's Bay Area Now debut at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Theater, he unveiled a dance about blindness. It was, well, not much to look at.


more...


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