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 Post subject: Mark Foehringer Dance Project
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2001 10:26 pm 
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Location: SF Bay Area
The Mark Foehringer Dance Project opens its sixth season:<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Choreographer injects humor into classics<P>Anita Amirrezvani, San Jose Mercury News<P>Some people think Mark Foehringer is irreverent. Although steeped in the ballet classics, he likes to create funny dances. ``I have a really wicked sense of humor, sometimes not very polite,'' he says.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><a href=http://www0.mercurycenter.com/premium/arts/docs/dance27.htm target=_blank>More</a>


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 Post subject: Re: Mark Foehringer Dance Project
PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2001 8:53 pm 
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A review:<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Mark Foehringer Dance Project Premieres ``The Four Seasons"<P>Melinda Lightfoot, Ang Newspapers<P>Vivaldi's beloved musical cycle lives admirably in Mark Foehringer's new ballet, ``The Four Seasons." Its world premiere was performed last weekend by the Mark Foehringer Dance Project, a company of nine outstanding dance artists, at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><a href=http://buzz.insidebayarea.com/default_nmobuzz.asp?puid=4403&indx=0&article=on target=_blank>More</a>


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 Post subject: Re: Mark Foehringer Dance Project
PostPosted: Sat Aug 17, 2002 9:27 am 
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Octavio Roca in the SF Chronicle:

Quote:
The dance season is upon us, and Mark Foehringer's latest work sounds like something we shouldn't miss. more


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 Post subject: Re: Mark Foehringer Dance Project
PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2002 8:23 pm 
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Location: San Francisco, CA
Mark Foehringer Dance Project, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts
“String Quartet”, “Nuages”, “The Lark”, “The Four Seasons”
August 23, 2002

The sturdy Mark Foehringer Dance Company offered a home season of mixed works at the Yerba Buena Center on Friday. Mixed is probably a good way to describe the program, which ranged in style, as well as in presentation and execution.

The program opened with the world premiere “String Quartet”, set to the music of Sergei Prokofiev and performed live by the Conservatory of Music String Quartet. Despite some nice moments from the individual dancers, the piece didn’t quite hang together. Perhaps the dancers needed more time rehearsing with the musicians (as is often the case) because even those performers who are reliably musical, such as the elegant Holly Morrow, or Ballet San Jose’s Ramon Moreno, appeared a little lost.

Choreographically speaking, Foehringer puts together complicated phrases and canons which, though not necessarily fresh, are pleasant. Among the eight dancers, however, there seemed to be a range of technical levels, and so the crisp cleanliness that would have given the piece a much more finished look was somehow lacking. Several of the women looked ill-at-ease to be on pointe (this was the only piece of the evening on pointe) making me wonder if their insecurity might not be blamed on a slippery stage. Nevertheless, it created a kind of strained impression throughout the first movement, almost as if the dancers were holding their breath. Difficult steps, such as a peculiar turn in attitude front, in plié, on pointe, looked even more difficult from lack of ease. Then too, no one seemed to have decided what was going on, what the piece was about. Relationships would appear as though they were beginning to emerge between two dancers and then would evaporate.

Certain images however, were striking, and the extended pas de deux danced by Bethania Gomes and Moreno offered a satisfying security, even in the midst of intricate partnering. Moreno, who is Cuban born, shows a classical training that translated into exactness and assurance along with an easy demeanor.

Even so, “Nuages”, which came second on the program was somewhat of a relief. A brief meditation, set to a nocturne by Claude Debussy “Nuages” was enhanced by a simple, but effective use of video projection on the cyc of lazily drifting clouds. The sheer scale of the projection behind the three dancers, Luana Hidalgo, Morrow and Carlo Sierras, not only gave them the appearance of bodies in space, but also filled spaces in the movement and offered them something to play against dynamically. Then too, Foehringer’s choreography got a fuller treatment here from the trio of dancers, who looked to be happy to have soft shoes on.

Graciela Acedo and Moreno danced a pas de deux called “The Lark” to the music of Glinka, to close the first half. Moreno again displayed refinement and purpose of movement, but ultimately there were no sparks between him and Acedo, who seemed perhaps too wrapped up in her own thoughts to communicate with the audience or her partner. The result was that the difficult choreography oftentimes seemed like words in a vocabulary test, rather than danced phrases or sentences.

There was a change of mood after the intermission with Foehringer’s “The Four Seasons”, set to the Antonio Vivaldi work of the same title. Anyone fearing that we might descend into an evening of earnest and yet ultimately depressing, heavy-deep-and-real offerings was delightfully surprised by the lighthearted turn.

Although the concept is perhaps not entirely new, (each section portrays an appropriately seasonal vignette) a refreshing closer, is a refreshing closer and always welcome. Certainly when a piece lifts the moods of the dancers and begs the audience to be drawn into their world, it can be called a success.

There was a not so promising beginning of home-movie projections and a pregnant woman crossing the stage, however, the “Spring” section quickly became a coy burlesque of insects and flowers with hints of Anna Pavlova’s “California Poppy” and Bumblebee tuna ads. Foehringer’s choreography here was totally different from the foregoing works, but also in its own way delightful, and the musicality that had been a touch mushy in the first pieces improved a great deal in the last. The dancers worked hard to get the right effects, and having achieved these, seemed to be relaxed enough to enjoy the performance.

The “Summer” beach and “Fall” picnic and “Winter” in the old folks home scenes were entertaining, despite overlong pauses as the dancers no doubt wrestled with costume changes, but the highlight was the final look at Ramon Moreno’s dancing in the closing solo of the piece. With work like that in his company, Mark Foehringer Dance Project will always be welcome.


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 Post subject: Re: Mark Foehringer Dance Project
PostPosted: Tue Aug 27, 2002 1:01 am 
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Location: The Bronx is up; the Battery's down
Quote:
Originally posted by Azlan:
A review:

Quote:
[b]Mark Foehringer Dance Project Premieres ``The Four Seasons"

Melinda Lightfoot, Ang Newspapers
[/b]
There's a dance critic named "Lightfoot"?

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 Post subject: Re: Mark Foehringer Dance Project
PostPosted: Tue Aug 27, 2002 8:24 am 
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Location: El Granada, CA, USA
Apparently so.

Here's a review from the Examiner. It's the second item in this article.

Quote:
Dance for every season
BY RACHEL HOWARD
Examiner Dance Critic

It was all a lackluster finish to an otherwise laudable showing. Foehringer, who grew up in Brazil with his missionary parents, has assembled a solid group of ballet dancers. The women in particular appear to be more at home in the studio than on the stage, but more performing may change that -- and guest artist Ramon Moreno of Ballet San Jose Silicon Valley set the standard at an unfair height.
more...


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 Post subject: Re: Mark Foehringer Dance Project
PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2002 10:37 am 
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From the SF Bay Guardian.

Quote:
Good humor
Mark Foehringer Dance Project is gracefully comic.

By Rita Felciano
WHEN I FIRST saw Mark Foehringer's choreography two years ago (in Rhapsodia, his quasi-murder mystery performed around a dinner table), I thought the humor overly broad and further hindered by a protracted sense of timing. Either my eyes have improved or Foehringer's choreography has, because 2001's The Four Seasons, his most recent lengthy comic excursion, presented last weekend (Aug. 23-25) at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, skipped through the treacherous realm of dance comedy with spirit and grace.
more...


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 Post subject: Re: Mark Foehringer Dance Project
PostPosted: Sat Jun 19, 2004 8:23 am 
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Location: SF
From the Oakland Tribune,

Quote:
World premiere dance project debuts at Yerba Buena

BEST known for its lyrical yet fun approach, The Mark Foehringer Dance Project/SF presents the world premiere of "Loose Translations" at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco this weekend.
Click for more


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 Post subject: Re: Mark Foehringer Dance Project
PostPosted: Mon Jun 21, 2004 12:54 pm 
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Location: SF
From the San Francisco Chronicle,

Quote:
Dancers without borders, sampling forms far and wide
Mark Foehringer mixes up movements at Yerba Buena

Ann Murphy, Special to The Chronicle
Monday, June 21, 2004


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Choreographer Mark Foehringer isn't afraid to mix samba with angular postmodern steps or psychologically deft movements with a whodunit tale.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2005 11:14 am 
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Location: El Granada, CA, USA
A review of their latest from the SF Chronicle.

Quote:
REVIEW
Mark Foehringer takes on a formidable challenge, translating Brazilian novel 'Diadorim' into ballet
Janice Berman, Special to The Chronicle

Tuesday, June 28, 2005

Sadly, "Diadorim," a Brazilian western whose subtitle is "The Devil to Pay in the Backlands," succeeds neither as a story nor a ballet, despite a flotilla of excellent dancers drawn from many Bay Area schools and troupes. A lengthy printed synopsis is required to sort out their roles and the plot, and that's not much help in a darkened theater. The score, drawn from Heitor Villa- Lobos, Antonio Carlos Jobim and other composers, feels uninspired. Matthew Antaky's set design is nicely atmospheric, with appropriate instances of fog and illumination.


more...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 06, 2005 11:12 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
Gangs of Brazil and Their Feud, in Realistic Style
by JACK ANDERSON for the New York Times

There's nothing tame about "Diadorim." This 80-minute work hurtles along with almost hallucinatory delirium. But the narrative is stuffed with so many incidents that the production sometimes grows dramatically incomprehensible and aesthetically indigestible.

published: July 4, 2005
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 22, 2005 3:28 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
Footnotes
An Unfathomable Plot, Burdened With Magic Reality

by TOBI TOBIAS for the Village Voice

From time to time the obsessively detailed plot gives way to pure dancing, and Foehringer's considerable choreographic skill — and the dancers' gifts — shine clear.

published: July 19, 2005
more


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 17, 2008 5:32 pm 
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Posts: 350
Location: San Francisco
Mark Foehringer Dance Project
JCCSF
September 5, 2008, 8PM

Mark Foehringer's lucky 13th season brought a pair of well thought-out works to the JCC's Kanbar Hall stage last weekend. With last year's "In Fugue" making an encore and the world preview of "Entrelazo," Foehringer shook things up, albeit with the help of plate tectonics.

"In Fugue" centered on release and continuous circles, both in Jack Perla’s score as well as in the movement on stage. The seven dancers focused on a point at the back of the stage and then broke off, pairing up or moving in groups, highlighting different rhythms and sections of the music with pop. Plies sprung into grandiose sissones and segued through to short, buoyant lifts, all while maintaining the calming rhythm of children happily bouncing on a trampoline. Marina Fukushima, a lovely and introspective dancer, moved well and had a nice spring to her step as she flowed through her solo work, and the remaining dancers were also strong, included local favorite, former ODC dancer Brandon “Private” Freeman.

Even with the minor earthquake rumbling our seats, “Entrelazo” caused a lovely stir. Inspired during his time in Peru, Foehringer’s choreography springs from ideas of faith and worship, but goes farther in addressing our inter-relatedness on those around us. Dressed in ocean blue dresses and pants, the nine dancers swept from wing to wing, becoming (intentionally) entangled in white stretchy fabric and providing images racing across the stage of longitude and latitude as well as more abstract divides like race, religion, ethnicity, and beliefs. Tina Kay Bohnstedt stretched her limbs wide, beautifully creating geometric shapes with her body while bending about; really, Bohnstedt could simply plie, and many would stare in awe. She mesmerizes that easily. But the music—Arvo Part’s choral “Miserere”—was big with its building crescendos and pounding tones, and seemed too large a scale for Foehringer’s undertaking. Foehringer excels at the silent solos and delicate duets, but a cast of nine combined with such an emotionally vast score may not be the appropriate combination for his personalized choreography.

While “In Fugue” put on a cute, quirky front, “Entrelazo” showed Foehringer’s solemn side. I look forward to seeing more of his work to come.

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