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 Post subject: Russell Maliphant
PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2001 9:50 pm 
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Russell Maliphant Dance Company
by Kelly Apter in The Scotsman

The Dundee Festival of Dance has been nothing if not eclectic. Sandwiched in between the ensemble antics of Scottish Dance Theatre and the comic capers of Air Dance Company, we find the quiet studiousness of Russell Maliphant.

A former member of the Royal Ballet, Maliphant went on to perform with DV8 Physical Theatre and Michael Clark among others, and this hybrid of influences continues to produce interesting results.

Showcasing three new works in Dundee - Knot, Stream and Sheer - Maliphant once again plays with on-stage dynamics, mixing two duets with a trio. It is measured, unflashy work, timed with alarming precision and lit to perfection by long-time collaborator, Michael Hulls.

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<small>[ 10 April 2004, 10:00 AM: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Russell Maliphant
PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2002 11:59 pm 
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Russell Maliphant <BR>Two/Knot/Stream/Sheer<BR>Brighton Corn Exchange, 3rd April 2002 by Lyndsey Winship<P><BR>For all that they are accomplished and assured performers, Russell Maliphant's company dance like introverts. During the duet Knot where two identical male dancers fold and unfold, wind and unwind around the pivot of their intertwining arms I was longing to shout, ‘break free’, for one of the dancers to disentangle himself, to face the audience, to leap from the grasp of the choreography and assert a personality.<BR>But that was just one frustrating moment in a programme of masterful dancing. What Maliphant does give us is poise, subtlety, development, equilibrium and moreover, what he is known for - a fusing of movement and light. Here, the affinity between the dancing body and the impact of lighting design is akin to the musicality of Alston or Morris.<P>The tone is set from the opening gesture. A square spotlight frames Dana Fouras. Centre stage, feet welded to her spot. The resolve of that stark quadrilateral reflects the focus of her solo. With soles set in the stage, arms frame her face and limbs experiment with their hinges, extensions and rotations. The mechanics of the body are oiled to perfection. Quickening in speed while the light from above at first catches corners, then blurs the movement like a slow shutter, making Catherine Wheel circles. Slim arms turned into butterfly wings and the stage into a cinema screen.<P>Maliphant won the Time Out Live Outstanding Collaboration Award for his piece Sheer, which forms the second half of the programme. Two dancers form silhouettes as spotlights illuminate the back wall - a notion that immediately sets the agenda by lighting the set and not the dancers. They are merely a pair of shadow puppets, shifting to the ebb and flow of a body's music while a whispering voice repeats ‘She always wondered if he heard her’. The couple (Maliphant and his partner Fouras) read each other’s movements in sympathy, gradually edging towards one another. Arms cross but don't touch. It's close but not intimate. Slowly, slowly gaining trust until they can lean and lift, or clasp hands like a keystone between arching arms of a tentative tango. All the while the dancers' shadows play out the same duet across the floor and against the wall, slightly sharper or blurred at the edges. Moving in and out of the light, multiplying couples having the same conversation, the same misunderstanding, the same tender moment.<P>Only fleetingly do the dancers escape from the earth, a brief surge in a lift or leap. The movement is meditative, compact and fluid. Feet retrace steps, delving over, under and through, trying to find another way round this body, yet still appreciating the quality of a simple clean straight line (perhaps something left over from Maliphant's ballet days). He finds a movement, moulds it, kneads it, multiplies it. In Stream, where three dancers begin to twist, winding at different speeds like the cogs of a clock - seconds, minutes and hours - the twist of a wrist spreads to an arm, becomes a turning torso, a spinning figure then a movement in a circle. He uses a motif like a craftsman but sometimes mislays the erratic genius' touch.<P>Compared with Michael Hulls’ inspired lighting, Maliphant’s musical partners lack such structural imagination. During the first half, the soundtrack is a poor partner but in Sheer, Sarah Sarhandi’s score is detracting, meandering and clumsy. Sampled whispers and mournful strings make some nice sounds but don't manage any coherent development. It doesn't seem to communicate with, influence or react to the dancers. And I wondered (like the whispering voice says) if they really heard it at all.<P>


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 Post subject: Re: Russell Maliphant
PostPosted: Wed Apr 24, 2002 12:51 am 
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<B>Maliphant/Ballet Boyz</B> <BR>4 stars, The Place, London<BR>By Judith Mackrell in The Guardian<P><BR>Of all the works toured by George Piper Dances last year it was Russell Maliphant's Critical Mass which most justified Michael Nunn and William Trevitt making their bid for life outside a ballet company. <P>Not only was this improvisatory duet a piece that could never be danced in a conventional classical programme, it also showed the two men (aka The Ballet Boyz) engaged in an avid exploration of a new body language and responding to each other with an intimacy and directness that prince roles could never allow. <P>So it's good to see that the Boyz' second company commission, Torsion, is a brand new duet from Maliphant, allowing them to work with the choreographer from scratch. <P><A HREF="http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4400369,00.html" TARGET=_blank><B>click for more</B></A><BR>


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 Post subject: Re: Russell Maliphant
PostPosted: Wed Apr 24, 2002 1:25 am 
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<B>Mesmerising - in small doses</B><BR>by Judith Flanders in The Evening Standard<P><BR>Three works of choreographer Russell Maliphant are on display at The Place: Knot, which Maliphant himself performs with Israeli dancer Yuval Pick; then Sheer, Maliphant once more, this time with Dana Fouras; and finally Torsion, with Michael Nunn and William Trevitt, ex-Royal Ballet principals who are spreading the gospel of dance through their television documentaries about the "Ballet Boyz". <P>An evening solely of Maliphant's work is, however, not going to bring in converts. <P>His work is very detailed, and very beautiful, and very limited in both range and vocabulary. To watch one piece is mesmerising; to watch three in a row is a disappointment. <P><A HREF="http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/dynamic/hottx/theatre/dance_review.html?in_review_id=463677&in_review_text_id=530479" TARGET=_blank><B>click for more</B></A><BR>


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 Post subject: Re: Russell Maliphant
PostPosted: Wed Apr 24, 2002 1:55 am 
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<B>A few thoughts on Maliphant/Ballet Boyz</B><P>I find myself in agreement with Judith Mackrell in The Guardian. The opening night of the Maliphant/Ballet Boyz provided some of the most beautiful dance I have seen this year. I found these three duets fascinating and savoured the variety of expression that each contained.<P>Judith Flanders in The Evening Standard is rapidly reaching the status of an anti-authority for me - someone you read and then believe the opposite. Unlike her I was mesmerised by all three, as were by far the majority of the three hundred people in a full Robin Howard Theatre. Yes, Maliphant is making regular use of swinging arms these days, but Flanders comment on the limited vocabulary makes me wonder whether one would say, 'Oh that Petipa - there he is again with his arabesques, attitudes and pirouettes!'<P>'Knot' with Maliphant and Yuval Pick had a competitive edge as the two looked warily at eachother and in the duet they always seemed to be looking for an advantage. 'Sheer' was my favourite from the three works on show with Maliphant and his partner Dana Fouras illustrating the development of a relationship with elegance and musicality that I found evocative and involving, but without a hint of sentimentality. The opening sequence with the two silhouetted had a gentleness that was markedly different from the other two works and the high lifts used in the second half made me catch my breath. I am looking forward to seeing it again.<P>Michael Nunn and William Trevitt applied their great talent and energy to the newly commissioned piece 'Torsion'. They clearly relish working with Maliphant and bring a robust and precise style to movements that Maliphant and his own dancers would treat with greater smoothness and flow. I find this contrast very intriguing. Whereas their earlier Maliphant piece 'Critical Mass' has them closely together performing mirror images of the same moves, here they are differentiated initially with similar, but not identical moves on opposite sides o the stage. The lighting by Michael Hulls, who continues the brilliant work that he has designed for Maliphant in the past, focusses on one and then the other. Later they move around a circle of light until eventually they play out the piece in unison.<P>I hope Nunn and Trevitt are delighted with 'Torsion' and the rewarding partnership they have forged with Maliphant. It will be interesting to see what choreographic choices they make next. <P><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited April 24, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: Russell Maliphant
PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2002 10:51 pm 
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Review in The Times.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>ONE of the smartest moves the Ballet Boyz ever made was hooking up with the choreographer Russell Maliphant. It was his Critical Mass which really made us see the Boyz — the former Royal Ballet stars Michael Nunn and William Trevitt — in a new light. They performed it on tour with their George Piper Dances last year, where its mesmerising blend of wrestling match and tango proved a riveting finale. Now Nunn and Trevitt have strengthened that collaboration with a new Maliphant piece specially made for them. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/0,,685-279671,00.html" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A>


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 Post subject: Re: Russell Maliphant
PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 2002 11:36 pm 
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Review in The Observer.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Torsion, a new commission for George Piper Dances, the company run by Ballet Boyz Michael Nunn and William Trevitt, combines elements of both previous duets. Trevitt and Nunn start as separate individuals, testing their own core strength with both feet firmly planted, arms flying.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.observer.co.uk/review/story/0,6903,706278,00.html" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A>


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 Post subject: Re: Russell Maliphant
PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2002 8:19 am 
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<B>If Greek statues could dance, they would do it like this</B><BR>By Ismene Brown in The Daily Telegraph (via Tiscali)<P><BR>DANCERS seek choreographers as American film-stars seek psychoanalysts - to understand them and help them to grow into an even better, shinier self. And in Russell Maliphant, the two men who form George Piper Dances have found their artistic analyst and sculptor.<P>George Piper Dances is Michael Nunn and William Trevitt, who left the Royal Ballet in 1999; they started their own company last year, homing in on those refined contemporary choreographers who themselves began in ballet, and thus command a large, expressive physical vocabulary.<P>Maliphant is one of the very best of these. His duet Critical Mass, taken up by Nunn and Trevitt in their inaugural season, practically defined them, a muscular, enigmatic wrestling match. <P><A HREF="http://www.tiscali.co.uk/cgi-bin/news/newswire.cgi/news/telegraph/2002/04/27/thearts/165_.html" TARGET=_blank><B>click for more</B></A><BR>


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 Post subject: Re: Russell Maliphant
PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2002 12:02 am 
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Review in the Independent.<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Good new choreography is notoriously hard to come by. The big ballet companies tie themselves in knots in search of creative talent. So how is it that Michael Nunn and Billy Trevitt – the likeable "Ballet Boyz" behind the Channel 4 video diaries, now on the road with their own company – don't seem to have lost sleep over the issue? One reason is that they're a small outfit with fewer anxious sponsors breathing down their necks. But it's also that they've found their man in Russell Maliphant, whose toughly engineered dances fit them like the a pair of beautifully worn-in, rivet-reinforced, custom-made denims<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/theatre/reviews/story.jsp?story=290079" TARGET=_blank> <B> MORE </B> </A>


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 Post subject: Re: Russell Maliphant
PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2004 8:00 am 
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Quote:
Maliphant/ Adamson
Barbican, London

By LUKE JENNINGS and JOHN L WALTERS
The Guardian
April 10, 2004

The intention behind the Barbican's onlyconnect programme is that imaginative collisions of creative talent should spark extraordinary results.
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 Post subject: Re: Russell Maliphant
PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2004 12:08 am 
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Russell Maliphant
By Debra Craine for The Times


THE last time Russell Maliphant and Barry Adamson worked together they won an Olivier Award for best new dance production. Clearly, the indie choreographer and the bass-playing composer can read each other’s wavelength. So putting them together for the Barbican’s Only Connect series wasn’t much of a stretch.

Yet this one-off event wasn’t so much an exciting hybrid as a curious triptych, comprising gig, concert and contemporary dance show all rolled into one. There was the Barry Adamson Band, the BBC Concert Orchestra and the Russell Maliphant Dance Company.

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 Post subject: Re: Russell Maliphant
PostPosted: Wed Apr 14, 2004 11:54 pm 
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Quote:
Dance: Barry Adamson and Russell Maliphant

By LUDOVIC HUNTER-TILNEY
Financial Times
April 13, 2004

Anyone with prejudices about setting modern dance to pop music would have had them confirmed during the opening section.
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 Post subject: Re: Russell Maliphant
PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2004 11:51 am 
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A match made in heaven
By Zoe Anderson for The Independent
13 April 2004

Barry Adamson and Russell Maliphant aren't working to the same definition of cool. Adamson's music goes from lush soundtrack strings to jazz and sampling; he's keen on Sixties movie chic. Maliphant, on the other hand, is all refined detachment. His company come soberly on in their modern-dance pyjamas, ascetic and slightly scruffy. Could these dancers ever mooch?

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<small>[ 15 April 2004, 01:52 PM: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Russell Maliphant
PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 2005 9:48 am 
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Quote:
Maliphant's choreography trips light fantastic

by KELLY APTER
the Scotsman

But it is his relationship with lighting designer Michael Hulls which has given Maliphant’s work an artistic, almost architectural edge. Hulls is also no stranger to collaboration, having worked with choreographer Akram Khan, composer Gavin Bryars and Turner Prize-winning artist Anish Kapoor. Together with Maliphant, Hulls creates a working space as dynamic as the choreography danced upon it.
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 Post subject: Re: Russell Maliphant
PostPosted: Mon Jan 31, 2005 11:38 am 
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Quote:
Slow dancing that quickly wins converts

by THOM DIBDIN
the Edinburgh Evening News

There is a big difference between being concise, and selling your audience short. Maliphant’s intense style of choreography certainly brings everything down to a fine point. And just because it looks effortless, it doesn’t mean no effort has gone into it.
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