public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Thu Oct 02, 2014 6:55 am

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 31 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Paris Opera Ballet, Salford
PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2000 7:11 pm 
Michael, I am beginning to remember having met you at the Raymonda 2 years ago in Paris, though my impression is still faint. But I don't think you told me that you wrote for Dance Europe. Were you with a group of American friends that night? It's a pity as I'd like to have met you in Paris last month at the Cinderella.<P>By the way, I think you mistook me for someone else in the other point you made. It wasn't me who tried to buy your article for an Asian magazine.<P>Some young dancers that caught my eye this time in Paris are Karl Paquette, Eleonore Abbagnato. Do you like them too?<P>


Top
  
 
 Post subject: Re: Paris Opera Ballet, Salford
PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2000 2:25 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Apr 23, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 215
Location: France
Dear Kevin,<BR>Yes, I was with a group of American friends two years ago. I shall let your comment on your impression being faint, pass for now!<P>Actually, I started to write for the magazine just after we met.<P>I share your opinion of Abbagnato and Paquette. I believe she is going to be recognised as one of the leading Ballerina's in the world; in a few years time.<BR>Paquette, still has some technical rough edges to smooth over, but have been watching him closely for some time and he definitely has something special.<P>Are you coming over for Mats Ek's new creation, later this month?<P>Well, nice to meet you again and to share the passion for the POB.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Paris Opera Ballet, Salford
PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2000 3:39 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Booking for the POB at The Lowry for any UK fans.<P>The Lowry Box Office (0161 876 2000 and expect a long wait) told me today, Wednesday 11.00am, that the POB evening performances are sold out, except for boxes that must be bought as a block of 8. However, there are seats left for the 2.00 pm matinees - about 200 on Saturday (don't know prices) and 100 on Sunday (from £30 upwards).<P>There are no cheap train seats left from London to Manchester on Sunday, so a return Euston-Manchester will be £43. The only sensible train out is at 9am and there is a train back at 6.06pm. (Virgin is 08457 222333)<P>It is possible to go by coach from Victoria, going at 8.30am and back on the 6pm or 7.30pm coaches for £15 (tel. 08705 80 80 80).<P>For both methods, the Lowry advise taking the Broadway Metro from Manchester station to Harbour City (15 minute journey). They advise not to take the train from Manchester to Salford. <BR><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited May 03, 2000).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Paris Opera Ballet, Salford
PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2000 11:52 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Apr 23, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 215
Location: France
Update!!!<BR>This might be of particular interest to Kevin.<BR>Eleanora Abbagnato will be making her debut as Nikiya at the Saturday matinee; you are going to be hearing alot more about this young phenomenon, she's only 21.<BR>As mentioned before Nicolas Le Riche will be dancing Solor and Elisabeth Platel is coming out of retirement to dance Gamzatti.<P>Wish I could be there to see it!


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Paris Opera Ballet, Salford
PostPosted: Fri May 05, 2000 5:09 am 
Michael, thanks very much for your update. I wish I could be there to watch her debut.


Top
  
 
 Post subject: Re: Paris Opera Ballet, Salford
PostPosted: Fri May 05, 2000 12:54 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Michael, what's the low-down on the Sunday matinee casting. It had better be good as I'm spending some 10 hours travelling to see this!!!<p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited May 05, 2000).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Paris Opera Ballet, Salford
PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2000 12:13 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Apr 23, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 215
Location: France
Dear Start and any other interested persons,<P>Found this on culturekiosk, it has some cloudy casting info - <A HREF="http://www.culturekiosque.com/dance/Features/rhelowry.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.culturekiosque.com/dance/Features/rhelowry.html</A>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Paris Opera Ballet, Salford
PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2000 3:38 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Michael, your views on Gaida and Legris, which looks like the Sunday matinee casting?


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Paris Opera Ballet, Salford
PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2000 4:50 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Judith Mackrell has a good time at POB and loves everything except Letestu, whom she find so smooth in her movement that a certain blandness creeps in. Looking forward to to-morrow more than somewhat, as I am Salford bound.<P><BR> <A HREF="http://www.guardianunlimited.co.uk/reviews/story/0,3604,217919,00.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.guardianunlimited.co.uk/reviews/story/0,3604,217919,00.html</A> <BR>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Paris Opera Ballet, Salford
PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2000 6:28 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Apr 23, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 215
Location: France
Dear Stuart,<BR>Sadly, Gaida is one of my least favorite étoiles, but with Manuel Legris you will get seamlessly perfect technique and one of the most experienced male dancers on the planet.<BR>I wouldn't imagine fireworks though.<P>I hope the corps de ballet is breathtaking and brings you great pleasure.<P>Did anyone see Abbagnato's debut this afternoon?


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Paris Opera Ballet, Salford
PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2000 2:51 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Jann Parry in the 'Observer' enjoys POB in 'La Bayadere', but one gathers not quite asmuch as she expected, but she loves the theatre and having just got back (details later) I can understand why.<P> <A HREF="http://www.observer.co.uk/review/story/0,6903,218206,00.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.observer.co.uk/review/story/0,6903,218206,00.html</A>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Paris Opera Ballet, Salford
PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2000 6:02 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Apr 23, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 215
Location: France
Heard a twisted message concerning the Sat. matinee - Abbagnato debuted in Gamzatti, Platel danced Nikiya. If I was A.D. I would have done it the other way round (a 41 year old temple dancer?); but I understand why.<P>I can't wait to hear too, Stewart!<p>[This message has been edited by Michael Montgomery (edited May 07, 2000).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Paris Opera Ballet, Salford
PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2000 10:16 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Image <P>A 'too lovely to miss' image from The Times review - Agnès Letestu as Nikiya in Act II of the Paris Opera Ballet's staging of La Bayadère. "Letestu is a model of the French style, long fine lines moulded with decorative finesse" <BR>Photograph: DEE CONWAY<P> <A HREF="http://www.the-times.co.uk/news/pages/tim/00/05/08/timartdan02001.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.the-times.co.uk/news/pages/tim/00/05/08/timartdan02001.html</A> <P><BR>Over on ballet.co.uk, Ann Williams has contributed a fine review of the two Saturday performances. Scroll down the thread until you reach Ann's review.<P> <A HREF="http://www.danze.co.uk/dcforum/happening/683.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.danze.co.uk/dcforum/happening/683.html</A> <P>And here is Ismene Brown's review in 'The Daily Telegraph', <P> <A HREF="http://www.telegraph.co.uk:80/et?ac=000148269364269&rtmo=0ibGGKJq&atmo=99999999&pg=/et/00/5/8/btbaya08.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.telegraph.co.uk:80/et?ac=000148269364269<BR>&rtmo=0ibGGKJq&atmo=99999999&pg=/et/00/5/8/btbaya08.html</A> <P><BR><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited May 08, 2000).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Paris Opera Ballet, Salford
PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2000 10:03 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
A day of much excitement and worth the 12 hours travel from London to Salford and back. Paris Opera Ballet were in the new Lowry Lyric Theatre for only five performances, but the visit broke the stranglehold of London and Edinburgh on visits by top world companies. <P><BR><u>The Building</u><P> Image <P>The Lowry is part of a regeneration scheme of the industrial wasteland of the Salford Quays area. Our topic on 'New Venues' has a number of architecture articles about the development, <A HREF="http://www.criticaldance.com/ubb/Forum8/HTML/000009.html" TARGET=_blank>http://www.criticaldance.com/ubb/Forum8/HTML/000009.html</A> . From the outside, it's a lively, high-tech building, which presents interesting aspects from a number of directions. The interior public areas have curved walls, staircases and corridors that have a sculptural quality. Whereas the exterior is mainly stainless steel, the interior is a riot of colour with orange carpet and yellow, blue and purple walls. I liked it, but some I spoke to there did not.<P>In the auditorium, dark blue and purple predominates and the Circle and Upper Circle are elegant curves. Some have described it as merely 'functional', but when I first entered I stopped and looked around in something close to wonder at the harmony of the space, which provides seating for 1750. I was fortunate enough to be in the front of the Circle, which is above the 12th row of the stalls and it was one of the finest seats I have ever had for a major dance performance. A quick inspection of the 2nd Circle (not as high as Sadler's Wells) and the stalls (well raked after 6 rows or so) suggested to me that this is a theatre with a high percentage of seats with excellent sightlines. Comparisons inevitably come to mind with the recently reopened Royal Opera House, where English Hertage listing considerations and perhaps sentimental reasons have meant that it is one of the most beautiful theatres in the country, but with a low ratio of very good seats for ballet. <P>The stage is the largest outside of London with great depth that Paris Opera Ballet fully exploited. The orchestra pit is deep and I mean deep. The acoustic was fine from where I sat, but I could see perhaps a third of the players. It may not be so good at the back of the stalls or the Upper circle. <P>Overall, The Lowry is a fine addition to Europe's multi-purpose venues, which are suitable for major dance companies. The next few months see visits from Rambert, Northern Ballet Theatre, Birmingham Royal Ballet and the Trocks . Smaller modern dance companies are catered for in the smaller Quays Theatre and a number of UKs best are already lined up. Here is The Lowry's website,<BR> <A HREF="http://195.226.34.58/frameset/ns.html" TARGET=_blank>http://195.226.34.58/frameset/ns.html</A> <P><BR> <BR><u>Paris Opera Ballet's La Bayadère</u><P> Image <P>POB have not been to the UK for 17 years. Let's hope it's not as long before they return. The highly enjoyable 'La Bayadère' was a good choice for a variety of reasons - it is probably be the most spectacular production that will be seen in the Lowry for a long time and it shows off the strength in depth of the Company. <P>The excellent programme notes explain that Nureyev's version follows the Kirov production closely . The first Act introduces the characters and gets the story started with various ensemble dances and some solo work for Nikiya. In the second act the plot puts its feet up for most of the 45 minutes, and we see plenty of solo and more ensemble dance on the occasion of the betrothal of Gamzatti and Solor, until the climax with the death of Nikiya. The third Act, with the entry of the Shades and much virtuoso dance is, understandably, one of the most popular in the entire repertoire. Nureyev, unlike Makarova, follows the current Kirov version and drops the final Act with the destruction of the temple and bodies everywhere. As a result the Bronze Idol variation and the Pas d'Action are moved to Act II.<P>There is much to admire in the sets and the costumes and and the designer Frigerio describes the concept as, '… a mix of the Indian and the Ottoman empire….' Thus there is no attempt at an Indian 'reality' and the second act features a Moorish palace and Solor's chamber has some very attractive Art Nouveaux glass windows. It's probably just as well, as the choreography has few links to the India and in one instance seems to bear an uncanny resemblance to steps from the Hungarian Czardas. The only aspect of the production that made me uncomfortable was the brown bodies of the 'Hindus' and others not of the ruling clique. Somehow it would have made sense if everyone was made up this way, but as it was, it did seem an unnecessary anomaly.<P>The high spots of the Sunday matinee for me were the dancing of Manuel Legris and the corps de ballet. Whilst the slight Legris is not a convincing soldier, in all other aspects his performance was superb. From his first entrance, the elegance of his gestures in the most mundane movements marked him out as an exemplar of the famous Paris tradition. I was impressed with his musicality, his eloquent use of the upper body and his sureness of step in the solo sections. His presence on stage is remarkable. In addition, his partnering of both ballerinas seemed attentive. A case could be made that he showed little anguish or confusion in the early stages at the choice he has to make between his two loves, but it didn't really seem to matter. <P>The corps were lovely to behold throughout with fine ensemble dancing and much, that word again, elegance. The entrance of the Shades had very dim lighting, which took something away from the experience for me. Nevertheless, higher lighting levels for the difficult second half of this opening sequence for the corps showed them tackling the exposed balances with a good deal more assurance than English National Ballet had shown in the same work at the Coliseum earlier this year.<P> Image <P>Aurélie Dupont with Kader Belarbi in Petit's "Le Loup".<P>photo by Pascal Elliott Bourasseau <P>Fanny Gaïda danced the role of Nikiya. Her fluent and supple port de bras reminded me of Viviana Durante and the restrained emotional power of her dancing was at its best in her heart-breaking solo at the end of Act II. However, despite her fine technique, I found her movement style did not totally engage me. Aurélie Dupont played Gamzatti with the attitude of a spoiled and conniving rich girl and her heartless murder of Nikiya was certainly chilling. Her technique in the Act II solos seemed very fine and I am keen to see her in a longer role than this one. With ballerinas of the quality of these two, I suspect that at the end of the day it comes down to personal subjectivity. With neither Gaïda nor Dupont did I find myself sucking in my breath as I have done in the past year with Durante, Daria Klimentova of ENB or San Francisco's extraordinary Lucia Lacarra. But that's my problem, not theirs <P>Nureyev's 'La Bayadère' provides much opportunity for other soloists to show what they can do. Fanny Fiat danced with much verve in 'Djampo' and the 'Indian Dance'. Gil Isoart made the most of the virtuoso exoticism of the Bronze Idol variation and Laëtitia Pujol, dancing second, made the biggest impression on me of the three Shade variations.<P>Overall, The Lowry has had a grand opening, fitting for its bold concept and some 8,000 ballet fans have seen a splendid production by a very fine company. And it's the word company that is the most important here with the depth of talent and the care to detail by all those concerned magnifying the total effect. <P>Do come back soon POB. Please. <P><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited May 11, 2000).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Paris Opera Ballet, Salford
PostPosted: Tue May 09, 2000 8:21 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Apr 23, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 215
Location: France
Thanks Stuart,<BR>You certainly have been banging away!<P>Felt like I was there and am assured by the conclusions you drew.<P>Must say the dancers I've spoken with did not share your enthusiasm for the Lowry. But then they are rather spoiled.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 31 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group