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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet 2012-2013 Season
PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2013 11:23 pm 
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Alastair Macaulay reviews the Thursday, February 7, 2013 performance of Balanchine's "Western Symphony," "Symphony in Three Movements" and "Symphony in C" for the New York Times.

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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet 2012-2013 Season
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 7:56 pm 
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balletomaniac wrote:
New York City Ballet

It was a great free performance – but it also was a marvelous presentation, all the more significant for dispelling any lingering perception that ballerinas are bunheads (I overheard innumerable members of the audience commenting, with some measure of surprise, on how articulate and intelligent these ballerinas were), and for reemphasizing through the ballerinas’ repeated comments that Balanchine ‘allowed room for the ballerinas to create a world around them’. (Ms. Mearns)

Sara Mearns has started a nice weekly video blog at the Huffington Post.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/sara-mear ... 53209.html


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet 2012-2013 Season
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2013 7:50 pm 
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Location: New Jersey
New York City Ballet
David H. Koch Theater
Lincoln Center
New York, New York

February 9, 2013 (M)
Western Symphony; Symphony in Three Movements; Symphony in C

-- by Jerry Hochman

With its Tchaikovsky Celebration on temporary hiatus (pending its resumption with two weeks of The Sleeping Beauty), New York City Ballet has offered several performances representative of one or another general theme. Last week, NYCB presented a “New Combinations” evening, which I previously reviewed, devoted to pieces that purportedly illustrate innovative ways to choreograph the same essential ballet vocabulary. On Saturday (and on previous days this past week), NYCB presented a program representative of “Symphonic Balanchine”: Western Symphony, Symphony in Three Movements, and Symphony in C.

Well – not quite ‘symphonic’ Balanchine. Western Symphony is not choreographed to a symphony – it just has ‘symphony’ in its title. The piece was choreographed to a collection of western-themed ‘folk’ songs orchestrated by Hershy Kaye (who also orchestrated Balanchine’s Stars and Stripes, to marches by John Philip Sousa). But why quibble – Western Symphony, which to my recollection NYCB hadn’t performed in several years, is a delightful, if not exactly innovative, example of Balanchine at his most accessible.

But before getting to Western Symphony, I must briefly reference Symphony in Three Movements and Symphony in C, both of which have been the subject of previous reviews, because the pieces are so fabulous, and because each received stellar performances.

Stravinsky’s composition, his first in the United States (it was composed from 1942-1945, on commission from the precursor of the New York Philharmonic, and premiered in 1946), reportedly was inspired by various images of World War II. [It has been called Stravinsky’s ‘War Symphony’.] While it is comprised, at least in part, of unused music intended to be used as film scores, it sounds to my uneducated ear to have been derived from a number of different musical roots: classical (the piece has been described as ‘neo-classical’), romantic, rhythm-driven (like ‘Sacre’, which part of it resembles), and jazz. It is as mechanical, in part, and as violent, in part, as the mechanical and violent period in which it was composed.

The ballet is the same, but mechanical and violent (as well as an amalgamation of movement sources) in a more subtle, controlled, and refined way. It pays homage to classical and romantic roots, but its images also presage post-modern angst. It has curvilinear images, but it is also angular and stoic, without being orthodox about any of it. To this viewer, it is an art deco ballet; a moving, horizontal Chrysler Building of a ballet. And the piece is also more representative of ‘new combinations’ than anything on this year’s ‘New Combinations’ program.

Balanchine’s Symphony in Three Movements premiered on the opening night of the 1972 Stravinsky Festival. The previous year, a popular music group named The Fifth Dimension ("Up, Up and Away"; "Stoned Soul Picnic"; "Wedding Bell Blues"; "Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In") released a song (and album) titled “Love’s Lines, Angles and Rhymes.” I doubt very much that Balanchine was even aware of the song, much less inspired by it in any way (he didn’t need it; he had the Stravinsky score), but I kept thinking of that song title throughout Symphony in Three Movements, because to me the ballet is representative of choreographed lines, angles and rhymes (‘rhyming’ patterning and images), as well as a whole lotta love. [Sorry…but where else in a ballet review would you find references to both The Fifth Dimension and Led Zeppelin. In the same paragraph.]

What one remembers most about Symphony in Three Movements – or at least what I remember most about it – are Balanchine’s dramatic opening diagonal line of ballerinas in white; his closing image for the first movement of these ballerinas, in another diagonal line, gently and gracefully, but also dramatically and Romantically, changing body position and alignment the way that the Willis in Giselle change their body positions as they usher Hilarion to his death; the mechanically intense pas de deux that comprises the ballet’s central section; and the angled arms of the corps in the final movement that makes each dancer look both robotic and electrically charged. Indeed, it is the position of the dancers’ arms – angled but not fixed -- that is the ballet’s final, revolutionary image.

Any performance of Symphony in Three Movements is startling and revelatory. But when the performances match, it is cause for celebration. Saturday’s performances were worth a celebration by themselves.

I’ve written previously at length about NYCB principals Sterling Hyltin and Amar Ramasar, who danced the central pas de deux at Saturday’s performance. Each is a remarkably able and engaging dancer, with unique personal qualities that distinguish them from NYCB's other remarkable and engaging company dancers. I’ve seen both perform these roles previously – but it is a mark of a superb dancer to make a performance that could not possibly be any better somehow better, each time, than it was before. Both Ms. Ms. Hyltin and Mr. Ramasar consistently do so. Although he is memorable in anything he does, Mr. Ramasar is particularly masterful in roles that require powerfully detached, and effortless partnering. His performance Saturday appeared to surpass even his own previous efforts. Ms. Hyltin’s performance, however, not only surpassed her previous efforts – it took her performance to a different dimension of achievement. Although equally powerful and equally detached, Mr. Hyltin (a tiny dancer who I have previously described as consistently dancing larger than life) came across to me more like an undetonated bomb -- under control but potentially explosive. Simply put, she was magnificent. Ms. Hyltin and Mr. Ramasar (who was replacing Sebastien Marcovici) were ably complemented by Savannah Lowery and Andrew Scordato (replacing Adrian Danchig-Waring), and Tiler Peck and Daniel Ulbricht.

Symphony in C, choreographed by Balanchine to Bizet’s composition, premiered (as ‘Palais de Crystal’) in Paris, with the Paris Opera Ballet, in 1947, and was a component of NYCB’s first performance in 1948. The piece is evolutionary rather than revolutionary, but no less memorable than Symphony in Three Movements. Since Symphony in C is now as much of a staple for other companies as it is for NYCB (it is on American Ballet Theatre’s performance schedule this spring), familiarity is assumed. In Saturday’s performance, Ana Maria Scheller (replacing Abi Stafford) was a dynamically inspired lead for the first movement (allegro vivo), although her partner, Chase Finlay, was relatively leaden. The second movement (adagio) was superbly performed by Maria Kowroski and Tyler Angle, as was the ebullient third movement (allegro vivace), by Erica Pereira and Anthony Huxley. Lauren King and Taylor Stanley anchored the fourth movement (allegro vivace) with vigor.

Western Symphony, which opened the evening, suffers by comparison to the other two pieces on the program. Choreographed in 1954 to Kaye’s orchestration of such folksy tunes as ‘Red River Valley,’ ‘Good Night Ladies,’ and ‘The Girl I left Behind Me’, the piece is neither innovative nor particularly extraordinary, but it isn’t meant to be. What it is meant to be, and what it is, is a well-crafted ballet that’s a lot of fun to watch.

Divided into three sections (allegro, adagio, and rondo), the piece looks like what Susan Stroman might have done if she had been asked to graph a Western theme onto standard ballet vocabulary – but it lacks Ms. Stroman’s human characterizations, and has little of her irreverent sense of humor. [An aside – why is there no Stroman piece in NYCB’s spring 2013 season ‘American Music’ festival?] Each section focuses on the relationship between the two section leads. Although these relationships are essentially the same (cowboy and dance hall girl/coquette), and although the characters are each one-dimensional cardboard, they are treated somewhat differently musically and choreographically, and allow for different character nuances. In this viewer’s opinion, it is these character portrayals that make the piece as fun to watch as it is – and as fun to dance as it seems to be. But there’s nothing funny about the choreography, which at times (particularly in the rondo section) appears to be particularly challenging.

Megan Fairchild and Jared Angle led the second (adagio) section, which for this viewer was the best of the piece. Ms. Fairchild was delightfully playful, and the choreography had tongue-in-cheek comic components that the other sections lacked. [For example, Mr. Angle ‘searches’ for Ms. Fairchild among the section’s corps dancers, with similar imagery to Siegfried’s search for Odette; Ms. Fairchild does a fairly standard fish-dive into Mr. Angle’s arms, followed shortly thereafter by the same fish-dive, but she is swimming upstage, her tail facing the audience. From my vantage point, the audience got the joke.] Ashley Bouder and Robert Fairchild were each extraordinary in the third (rondo) section, taking advantage of the opportunities for bravura performances that Balanchine’s choreography encourages. The only unsatisfying section was the opening (allegro) section. Taylor Stanley’s cowboy was focused and determined and more cowboy than any cowboy could be. A little too intense, perhaps, but it was a very fine performance by this promising member of the corps. [As a replacement for Jonathan Stafford, Mr. Stanley debuted in the role earlier in the week.] But Rebecca Krohn seemed to downplay her role more than the role itself called for. As a result, and unlike the other two sections where the partners were equally matched, Ms. Krohn faded into the background.

All in all, however, this was a wonderful repertory performance, worth having to clear my car of a foot of snow first thing in the morning. And it is one to remember in the spring, when the repertory as presently scheduled may not be nearly as memorable.


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet 2012-2013 Season
PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 1:28 am 
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Gia Kourlas reviews the Wednesday, February 13, 2013 performance of "The Sleeping Beauty" for the New York Times.

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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet 2012-2013 Season
PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2013 12:30 pm 
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New York City Ballet
David H. Koch Theater
Lincoln Center
New York, New York

February 14, 2013
The Sleeping Beauty

-- by Jerry Hochman

It is sometimes easy to overlook Ashley Bouder. In a company with dancers as strong as those in New York City Ballet, Ms. Bouder, for all her proficiency, comes across as relatively ordinary (except with respect to her ability to move like lightning, which has always been her signature strength). She does everything well, but to this viewer doesn’t have the unique, extraordinarily personal qualities of other NYCB principal ballerinas.

And then one sees her Princess Aurora, and whatever one may have thought before doesn’t matter. Simply put, Ms. Bouder delivered one of the finest, and most complete, portrayals of Aurora that this viewer has seen. By any company, at any time.

This production of The Sleeping Beauty, choreographed, after Petipa, by Ballet Master in Chief Peter Martins, lacks the opulence, the complexity, and the bells and whistles of the current production by American Ballet Theatre (which will be part of ABT’s 2013 Spring Season at the Metropolitan Opera House). And except for the Garland Dance, which was choreographed by George Balanchine, what original choreography there is, in most cases, is not particularly memorable, and at worst, as in Scene I of Act I (‘The Christening’), can be abysmally dull. But simplicity can be a virtue, and this 1991 production, which had its season debut as part of the company’s Tchaikovsky Festival on Wednesday night, does not interfere with the performances. Indeed, with performances of the caliber of Ms. Bouder’s, there is little else for the eye to attempt, or want, to absorb.

There was not a low point anywhere or anytime in Ms. Bouder’s performance. From her entrance in Scene II of Act I (‘The Spell’), to her gloriously executed concluding pas de deux in Scene II of Act II (‘The Wedding’), she was spellbinding. What the audience at last night’s performance may remember most, however, is her exceptional balance capability. Her Rose Adagio was flawless – but it was better than that. She held every unassisted en pointe balance longer (but not inappropriately longer) than she needed to -- including the astonishing final balance, which she held as long, if not longer, than the prior three, eventually slowly lowering her right arm, and then teasingly hesitating a few seconds before allowing her hand to gently grasp the waiting hand of the last of her suitors. Not a hesitation; not a wobble. [I had previously considered ABT’s Gillian Murphy to be the champion at finding and maintaining her center; Ms. Bouder was her equal last night. For anyone familiar with Ms. Murphy’s performances, that statement, by itself, says it all.]

But balancing was not the sole determinant of Ms. Bouder’s performance. Her characterization was spot on. She was convincing as a young girl at her 16th birthday party, and majestic as a newly crowned queen at the ballet’s conclusion. Everything in between was merely superb: she was totally in control, and in command, at every point in the performance, from her fouettes to her changing tempo, to her gentle and time-stretching descents from pointe.

But there were two Princesses at last night’s performance: Ms. Bouder and Lauren Lovette, in her debut as Princess Florine in Act II’s Bluebird Pas de Deux. While the Bluebird pas de deux, appropriately, provides more of an opportunity for bravura display to Bluebird (here danced with precise exhilaration by Daniel Ulbricht), Ms. Lovette made the most of her role, dancing with delicacy, finesse, and crystalline clarity (on one occasion, she came down a bit too hard on one knee; not one other technical flaw that this viewer could see). But it wasn’t the technique that was most extraordinary – it was Ms. Lovette’s presence. The was no hint of sensuality, as I have seen previously, and no gently commanding appearance, as there was in her debut as the Sugar Plum Fairy. Those stage qualities would have been inappropriate for a Princess Florine, and neither was presented here. Instead, her characterization was one of simple, unaffected, youthful radiance.

Last night’s presentation was notable for other performances as well. As Prince Desire, Andrew Veyette was the prince next door. While his technique and execution are always commendable, and were last night, it is his unassuming stage personality, which he exhibits in all of his performances that I’veseen, that is particularly memorable. Indeed, one of Mr. Veyette’s most engaging qualities is an infectious and honest smile, particularly evident when he realizes that he’s done something a little less than perfectly. He is a wonderfully human, as well as a gifted, danseur. Additionally, Kristin Segin and Devin Alberda were a delightful White Cat and Puss in Boots; Savannah Lowery, Erica Pereira, Alina Dronova, and Jared Angle were the glowing jewels (Diamond, Ruby, Emerald, and Gold, respectively) – and Ms. Lowery was particularly, and wonderfully, regal. Jennifer Ringer, looking like Winona Ryder in Edward Scissorhands, delivered a strong Carabosse, and Marika Anderson, as The Queen, gave a noteworthy performance in a role that is often acted as part of the wallpaper. Isabella Vanik, an SAB student, and Daniel Applebaum were very good as Little Red Riding Hood and The Wolf, but in this day and age one should seriously reconsider whether that vignette should be portrayed as it is – it isn’t funny anymore.

Aside from the Garland Dance, which is an extraordinary example of Balanchine’s ability to make a crowded stage (32 dancers ‘garden dance villagers’; 8 ‘maids of honor’, and 16 students from the School of American Ballet) not only look uncluttered, but vibrant, the most memorable aspect of the production are the sets (primarily the stage curtains and reflected scenes) created by David Mitchell, with lighting by Mark Stanley). The changing curtain projections provide the audience with a wonderfully moving (literally), as well as ephemeral, stage set.

I hope to comment more about Mr. Martins’s production in the course of a subsequent review. Suffice it to say that in large part the additional choreography added to the Petipa template is uninspired. But regardless of its flaws, however, NYCB’s The Sleeping Beauty is well worth seeing, particularly for such extraordinary performances as were provided last night.


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet 2012-2013 Season
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 11:16 pm 
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Rhys Loggins reviews "The Sleeping Beauty" for Broadway World.

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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet 2012-2013 Season
PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 11:45 am 
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New York City Ballet
David H. Koch Theater
Lincoln Center
New York, New York

February 17 (E), 2013
The Sleeping Beauty

-- by Jerry Hochman

Following Ashley Bouder’s fabulous Aurora in last Thursday’s New York City Ballet performance of Peter Martins’s version of The Sleeping Beauty, I thought it might be unwise to attend other performances which could not possibly be as good. I was wrong. [Which I admit is getting to be a nasty habit.] Sterling Hyltin’s portrayal at Sunday evening’s performance was exceptional in its own way, and equally memorable.

While Ms. Hyltin was not as astonishingly secure in her balances during the Rose Adagio as was Ms. Bouder, I doubt that anyone else could have been. That having been said, Ms. Hyltin’s Rose Adagio was, technically, very well done – with the only ‘flaws’, if they can be so described, having been a bit too quick to grasp the first two of her four suitor’s hands. Other than that, to this viewer her performance was flawless. She nailed every turn, often appearing to use her legs as thrillingly dynamic flourishing exclamation points, and her ability to project – to dance, as I’ve previously described, larger than life – is truly remarkable. But more significant to me was her portrayal. Hers was a youthful and glowing Aurora, a little understandably overwhelmed by the attention, but reveling in it in an unassuming, gracious way. And Ms. Hyltin added nuances to her portrayal as all superb dancers do – the way she greeted her parents; acknowledged her suitors, and responded to the attention she was getting – that I suspect are unique to her, and that made her performance all the more real, and all the more enchanting.

Sunday’s performance also marked a number of role debuts, the most significant of which was Robert Fairchild’s debut as Prince Desire. Unlike Andrew Veyette, who danced the role opposite Ms. Bouder, Mr. Fairchild was no prince-next-door. He was royalty from his first stage entry; naturally noble to the core. And his execution was merely superb. As I’ve previously described, Mr. Fairchild is at the top of his game (I found it difficult to believe that this was his first Prince Desire) both in his individual execution (even his ennui looked princely), and in his unobtrusive partnering. For example, while Ms. Hyltin was secure throughout her performance and appeared to require little assistance, there was one point (and only one point) where I sensed she came out of a turn with her weight off center. Had she not been partnered well, her line would have been lost. But Mr. Fairchild kept her centered, without at any time appearing to do anything extraordinary. His was a remarkable debut. [Indeed, Mr. Fairchild may have tried to be too perfect. The only ‘glitch’ in his performance was a visible difficulty getting his overly ornate hat onto his head after he accepted the Lilac Fairy’s invitation to join him on a voyage to find his princess. After a battle (between him and the hat) lasting a few seconds, Mr. Fairchild finally got the feathered hat to stay perched on his head – barely – as he climbed onto the boat. I suspect that had the same problem occurred with Mr. Veyette, he would have quickly decided to bury the hat under his arm, or sheepishly toss it into the wings.]

Also in their role debuts were Rebecca Krohn as the Lilac Fairy, and the entire ensemble of precious gems and their escort: Megan LeCrone (Diamond); Sara Adams (Emerald); Lauren Lovette (Ruby) and Adrian Danchig-Waring (Gold). Ms. Krohn’s performance suffered from the same bland quality that characterized Janie Taylor’s performance in the role on Thursday. The steps were done without apparent flaw, but there was nothing more. The uninspired choreography doesn’t help, but perhaps Ms. Krohn will add a sense of gravitas, of being more than just another fairy, as she grows into the role. As for the gems and Gold, each of them performed admirably, but Ms. Adams was the more exuberant standout.

The remaining performances were a mixed bag. As Princess Florine and Bluebird, Ana Maria Scheller and Antonio Carmena began their pas de deux strongly (particularly Ms. Scheller), but each seemed to lose interest as the pas de deux progressed. Ms. Scheller’s portrayal became monochromatic and somewhat mechanical, and Mr. Carmena simply appeared to run out of gas. But under the circumstances, as last minute replacements for Lauren King and Harrison Ball (who were to have had their role debuts last night), their performances were more than adequate. On the other hand, Marika Anderson’s Carabosse was far better than adequate. In this production, the role of Carabosse appears to have been reduced to a cameo – particularly compared to other productions (e.g., ABT’s current version), where the role has real meat to it. However, as she demonstrated in her portrayal as The Queen on Thursday, Ms. Anderson has a remarkably expressive face, which she used to elevate the role in this production to a higher level. Hers was a very fine performance. Also notable was Ashley Laracey’s clearly articulated execution of the Fairy of Generosity, and the spunky Little Red Riding Hood of SAB student Clair Abraham. The conducting, by Interim Music Director Andrews Sill, was generally appropriate and lively, but his pacing frequently and unforgivably lagged slightly behind Ms. Hyltin, who is one of NYCB’s speed demons, forcing her to slow down a bit to avoid being ahead of the music.

Until Thursday evening’s performance, I had not seen this production of The Sleeping Beauty in many years. On second viewing last night, the production appears more ‘together’ than it did earlier in the week (although this could have been the product of a more central vantage point). But it still suffers from uninspired choreography. The fairy variations in ‘The Christening’ (Act I, Scene 1) are simply dull. Though they may be modeled after Petipa, something’s been lost in the translation. More significantly, the choreography for the Lilac Fairy seems to have been diminished in emphasis (similar to the more restrained choreography and staging for Carabosse). But the Lilac Fairy must stand out from the other fairies, and, like Carabosse, be a dominant force in the ballet. Without that, she’s just another fairy who happened to have been doing other things when the other fairies were giving their gifts to the infant princess, thereby having the opportunity to cast the last spell. It is possible that a dancer with a more commanding presence could make the choreography for the Lilac Fairy work (e.g., Sara Mearns), but the role’s impression should not have to be so dependent on any dancer’s individual performance qualities.

I’m not sure that turning the Countess in the 'Vision Scene' (Act I Scene 3) into an unsympathetic, overbearing nag was a good artistic choice (although it certainly made it easy for Prince Desire to be convincingly unattached and unsatisfied), but eliminating the more frequently seen dull corps choreography that opens that scene was a good decision. However, the choreography for the corps in 'The 'Wedding' Scene (Act II, Scene 2) is uninspired. I like the basic, elegant, white (or off-white) gowns, but the choreography is bland. Further, the choreography for the gems is essentially a rehashing of certain of the fairy variations from 'The Christening' scene (Act I, Scene 1). And the decision to have Prince Desire travel for an interminable time to get to the sleeping princess, and then have to cut through miles of overgrown brush, with his sword, to reach the castle, slows the action to a crawl. [It brings to mind memories of an old ABT production (not the current one), where one could go out for a coffee break when Prince Desire began his search through the woods, return to one’s seat, and still find him wandering through the forest. I still feel sorry for the late, great Fernando Bujones to have had to endure that.] I’m well aware that this is a fairy tale, and that it doesn’t need to be realistic – so Mr. Martins gets a pass on the sword/scythe/machete. But there’s no excuse for being dull. And the post-Wedding ‘apotheosis’, which looks like it was an added afterthought, is too remindful of the final scene in Balanchine’s The Firebird.

On the other hand, I again observed the wonderful scenery, including the changing scene curtains that I described in my review of Thursday's performance. And it occurred to me as it had not previously that the presentation was made as it was (rather than exclusively as fixed sets) in order to have the ballet appear to emerge from the pages of a children’s story book, complete with illuminated engravings set apart from (but complementing) the text, that even in two dimensions can transport the reader to another world. And it is in this sense that the ballet works best: it does take the audience into another world, and the nuts and bolts of what happens there may not be nearly as significant as the overall feeling it inspires. It may not be as opulent as the Land of the Sweets, or as magnificently imagined as the current ABT production, but it does the job of being a comfortable and accessible visual fairy tale. And there’s the sublime Tchaikovsky score, and, judged by the two performances I’ve seen to date, the prospect of seeing magnificently danced fairy tale characters come to life. Whatever its perceived flaws, Mr. Martins’s The Sleeping Beauty is a fitting culmination to NYCB’s Winter 2013 season Tchaikovsky Celebration, and with a week of performances left (and if any remaining tickets can still be found), it is well worth seeing.


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet 2012-2013 Season
PostPosted: Wed Feb 20, 2013 8:35 pm 
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Robert Johnson reviews "The Sleeping Beauty" for the Newark Star-Ledger.

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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet 2012-2013 Season
PostPosted: Wed Feb 20, 2013 8:48 pm 
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Alastair Macaulay reviews the Thursday, February 14 performance and the matinee and evening performances of "The Sleeping Beauty" on Sunday, February 17 for the New York Times.

NY Times


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet 2012-2013 Season
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 8:59 pm 
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A plethora of promotions!!

To principal: Chase Finlay, Ask LaCour, Adrian Danchig-Waring

To soloist: Justin Peck, Taylor Stanley, Brittany Pollack, Megan LeCrone, Lauren Lovette, Lauren King, Ashley Laracey, Gina Pazcoguin


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet 2012-2013 Season
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 9:12 pm 
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Promotions just announced at NYCB (from a reliable source), in alphabetical order:

To Principal -- Ask la Cour, Adrian Danchig-Waring, and Chase Finlay.

To Soloist -- Lauren King, Ashley Laracey, Megan LeCrone, Lauren Lovette, Georgina Pazcoguin, Brittany Pollack; Justin Peck, Taylor Stanley.


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet 2012-2013 Season
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 9:13 pm 
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Kate - Obviously, you type a lot faster than I do. :)


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet 2012-2013 Season
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 11:02 pm 
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Robert Greskovic reviews the Winter Season for the Wall Street Journal.

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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet 2012-2013 Season
PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 7:19 pm 
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NEW YORK CITY BALLET ANNOUNCES ELEVEN PROMOTIONS

The official press release has just arrived confirming the promotions detailed above.

Peter Martins made the promotions on Thursday, February 21 just before the Company’s evening performance of his full-length production of The Sleeping Beauty. All the newly appointed Principal Dancers and Soloists have performed featured roles throughout the two-week run of "The Sleeping Beauty", which closes out NYCB’s 2013 winter season with performances through February 24.


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet 2012-2013 Season
PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2013 7:17 pm 
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Congratulations to all the newly promoted dancers.

I hope to see Chase Finlay at the Mariinsky Festival in St. Petersburg next week. He will be performing Apollo at the final night Gala, perhaps more. If my memory is correct, NYCB dancers along with Royal Ballet and Bolshoi dancers have made up the large majority of guest artists at the Mariinsky Festivals. Teresa Reichlen was a 'Delight' as the Siren from The Prodigal Son last year.


"The Sleeping Beauty " -- Saturday Afternoon, February 23

Ana Sophia Scheller

Her Act I Aurora was Pure Heaven !

I'm on the road, but I would really like to at least express briefly how wonderful she was in Act I. She and the company deserve much more praise.

She had a softness and flow that was not typical of many of the other fine dancers. Her moves took off like a gentle cushion of air and an uplifting flood of heart-gripping poetry. She had a childlike aliveness and brightness. Her moves were expansive, perfectly timed, positioned beautifully both in transition and highlight, and on and on……

My memory power and ability to describe barely do her justice.

She was A Heart-Lifting Dream !

And speaking of childlike aliveness and brightness, the children performing the Garland dance and the little girl as Little Red Riding Hood did beautifully. They were about half the size and maybe half the age of other children that I've seen do this and they were a Joy.


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