public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Wed Jul 23, 2014 11:52 pm

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 96 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 7  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: San Francisco Ballet: 2010 Season
PostPosted: Sat Jan 09, 2010 7:21 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12093
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
San Francisco Ballet opens the 2010 season with a gala performance on January 20, 2010. This season marks Helgi Tomasson's 25th anniversary as artistic director and he has been asked for consultation on the pre-perfrmance dinner menu. Carolyne Zinko reports on the planning process for the gala in the San Francisco Chronicle.

SF Chronicle


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: San Francisco Ballet: 2010 Season
PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2010 11:46 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12093
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Allan Ulrich talks to SF Ballet Artistic Director Helgi Tomasson as a preview to Tomasson's 25th anniversary season.

Helgi Tomasson interview

He also talks to Elizabeth Loscavio, Christopher Wheeldon, Joanna Berman, Ashley Wheater and Tina LeBlanc about working with Helgi.

Artist interviews

A preview of the eight programs of the 2010 season.

2010 Season Preview


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: San Francisco Ballet: 2010 Season
PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 4:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12093
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
The San Francisco Museum of Performance and Design, located in the Veterans' Memorial Building next to the War Memorial Opera House, is showing Erik Tomasson's photographs of San Francisco Ballet through March 6, 2010. The museum is open Wednesdays through Saturdays from noon to 5:00 p.m.; admission is free. Janos Gereben reports in The Examiner.

SF Examiner


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: San Francisco Ballet: 2010 Season
PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2010 12:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 1738
Location: St. Petersburg, Russia
Here are my impressions:

San Francisco Ballet
Opening Night Gala
January 20, 2010

War Memorial Opera House
San Francisco, California

By Catherine Pawlick

On January 20, the San Francisco Ballet’s “Silver Celebration” gala took place, honoring 25 years of service from its current artistic director, Helgi Tomasson. Society’s glitterati came out in full force for the event which was preceded by dinner at City Hall, included a champagne reception in the main foyer before the performance, and an after-party to win over even the most diehard night owls. Balletomanes, students, critics, and the crème de la crème of the City by the Bay compared couture gowns, downed glasses of champagne, and then sat down to watch what would be, hopefully, some of the best dancing their local company has on offer.

Unfortunately, for an anniversary program of such magnitude, the evening’s dance selections left a bit to be desired. Mark Morris’ opening number, “Typewriter” from the Sandpaper Ballet, offered a sea of green unitard human “keys” who jump and shift, but do little in the way of real dancing. The piece requires no technique and only basic musicality. Following that, the pas de deux from “7 for Eight” picked up the pace only slightly, its repeat swivels and rotations performed by Nutnaree Pipit-Suksun with Pierre-Francois Vilanoba. The familiar Bach score gave Pipit-Suksun ample chance to unfold slow developpés in the air, but the choreography lacked complexity and depth. If it weren’t for Pipit-Suksun’s beautiful footwork, it would have been hard to remain focused on the piece.

Unfortunately a revision to what are, in every classical company, the gemstone fairies in Petipa’s original version of “The Sleeping Beauty,” sorely dissected the musical score with simpler, less expressive movement than the original choreography. With musical intuition pushed to the wayside, it might have been enough to simply watch the dancers execute the steps, but the outcome was instead distracting for here, instead of the requisite fairies, we had an additional 3 dancers crowding both score and the stage. Why must everyone meddle with a masterpiece? Petipa’s version is a classic for a reason.

The level of both dancing and choreography were redeemed slightly in Christopher Wheeldon’s “Rush,” performed by Katita Waldo and Damian Smith. Reminiscent at times of Alexei Ratmansky’s genius “Middle Duet,” “Rush” nonetheless includes simpler, legato-based movements that are, contrary to its title, never done in haste. Here are two dancers can be placed in any ballet and make it look professional.

Yuan Yuan Tan of the long, lean legs, was the first on the program to provide a European sensibility and visual indulgence in “Flute Moon” from the ballet “Chi-Lin.” Partnered by four men, she achieved a measured balance in exotic, sharp movements, forever accurate, reminding us that ballet is above all, a visual art form.

In sharp contrast, the significantly duller execution in “The Man I Love” from George Balanchine’s “Who Cares?” seemed a surprise coming from dancers who are typically lauded. Sarah Van Patten’s lines were blurry, her emotional displays overbaked; Pierre-Francois Vilanoba’s utterly nondescript costume – black pants with a purple Cossack-type sash – gave him an overly grounded look, and seemed out of place next to his partner’s gossamer pink dress, though his own partnering efforts were blameless. Lorena Feijoo and Vitor Luiz followed in a pas de deux from Tomasson’s “The Tuning Game,” which hardly impressed, due less to imperfect dancing than to repetitive choreography. By this point in the program, it seemed as if we’d already seen Tomasson’s full range of steps. And yet the dancers themselves had much to offer in polished delivery and adhesion to the piece’s overall mood.

Despite these low points, that Tomasson can sometimes hit the mark was the case with a singular ballet of his, “Concerto Grosso,” which has been rightfully praised for the occasion it affords five male dancers to display various bravura steps. If there is one thing that San Francisco Ballet has, it is strong male dancing. Most refreshing in this, Tomasson’s singular technique-driven work, was Diego Cruz, a new recruit with the calm certainty and fluid lines that make male dancing of the highest sort. Surprisingly, Cruz is an anomaly, perhaps the single company member who trained at the San Francisco Ballet School. A quick look at the roster reveals that of its 20 principal dancers, only four were trained in the United States, and of those only two spent some time, but not all of their training years, in the San Francisco Ballet School. This phenomenon –the inability to cultivate any significant number of quality principal dancers State-side -- is not new, but it does underscore the need for a more intense training system for ballet dancers in America. There is no reason we should not be able to cultivate the best dancers here, locally, but the pedagogical system and selection process must be improved in order for that to occur.

As if demonstrating what is possible with exquisite (Russian) training, Maria Kotchetkova’s rendition of Juliet in the balcony scene from Tomasson’s oversimplified choreography in “Romeo and Juliet” was by far one of the main highlights of the evening. This dancing selection not only better suited the framework of a gala evening in tone and genre, it offered the company’s prize principal dancer a chance to demonstrate her dramatic abilities. Even if the steps were watered down, as Juliet Maria Kotchetkova brought refined lyricism and an easily readable characterization to the passionate pas de deux. With Joan Boada as her Romeo, the two danced with soul-felt emotion that was unparalleled in the rest of the program.

One wonders if it is worth mentioning Sofiane Sylve in the “Agon” pas de deux, alongside Anthony Spaulding who clearly overshadowed her. Sylve would be an obvious choice if one were to choose a favorite ballerina – she has, after all, the glamour of coming from Nice, France -- but on the two occasions this reviewer has seen her, unfortunately, she has managed to disappoint.

That was not the case with the precision of Vanessa Zahorian in “Chaconne for Piano and Two Dancers” with Davit Karapetyan. Here, speed, line, and technique merged into a delightful display of contemporary movement.

Poor Gennadi Nedvigin, given an excerpt from a ballet that undermines his vast technical skills and beautiful lines. Clothed in streetwear khaki’s and a regular shirt, with jazz shoes covering his feet, he danced “Bugle Boy” from the Paul Taylor ballet, “Company B.” For a Vaganova-trained professional, the selection seemed an obvious insult to his talents, its overly simplistic movements better suited to someone with less technique to spare. Perhaps one of the dancers in the pas de trois from “On Common Ground,” another oddly nondescript work.

Our eyes feasted a second time on Ms. Tan’s mesmerizing lines next to Damian Smith in the pas de deux from “Fifth Season.” She decorated the slow violin music of Karl Jenkins with romantic nuance; Smith’s partnering was impeccable. But the closing piece, “Winter” from “Le Quattro Stagioni” left question marks on more than one patron’s face, and felt anticlimactic on this momentous occasion. Its sole highlight was the chance to enjoy Taras Dmitro’s airborne lightness, but against the structured, nondescript presence of the group of male corps de ballet members, this piece closed the evening on a somber note. In all, San Francisco Ballet has reserves of talent that, when given the proper venue, can sparkle as much as a crystal champagne glass. Here is to hoping that they'll have ample opportunity to shine in the future.

_________________
Author, "Vaganova Today: The Preservation of Pedagogical Tradition" (available on amazon.com)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: San Francisco Ballet: 2010 Season
PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2010 3:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12093
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Allan Ulrich reviews the Gala Performance in the San Francisco Chronicle.

Gala Performance Review

Also in the Chronicle, Carolyne Zinko reviews the festivities surrounding the Gala Performance.

Gala Festivities Review


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: San Francisco Ballet: 2010 Season
PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:39 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12093
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Janos Gereben reviews the Gala Performance in the San Francisco Examiner.

SF Examiner


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: San Francisco Ballet: 2010 Season
PostPosted: Mon Jan 25, 2010 3:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12093
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Allan Ulrich reviews the Saturday, January 23, 2010 performance of "Swan Lake" in the San Francisco Chronicle.

SF Chronicle


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: San Francisco Ballet: 2010 Season
PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 8:54 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12093
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Casting for "Swan Lake" on the SFB website:

Swan Lake Casting

I note that former PNB Principal Casey Herd continues as a guest artist, this time partnering Yuan Yuan Tan.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: San Francisco Ballet: 2010 Season
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:16 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 4:41 am
Posts: 26
Location: UK
SF Ballet: The swans have it
By: Janos Gereben
Special to The Examiner
January 25, 2010

As Odette and Odile, Maria Kochetkova danced both the fragile heroine and the evil temptress spectacularly, shining more in the white role, her arms moving with unique grace and beauty. The hero, Prince Siegfried, was Davit Karapetyan, a virtuoso dancer who landed after every jump, no matter how high, like a feather, defying gravity.


Read more at the San Francisco Examiner: http://www.sfexaminer.com/entertainment ... z0dpWWMmBG


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: San Francisco Ballet: 2010 Season
PostPosted: Thu Jan 28, 2010 2:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2009 5:08 pm
Posts: 10
I went to see Sarah dance O/O last night and wasn't disappointed. She had been nervous all day - with a new partner, Vadim - but they looked great together. (I didn't know Vadim was such a good actor.) There are times when she gets so far into a part that the choreography falls away. I've seen her do that in Concerto Barocco, Diamonds, and Romeo & Juliet. Last night was another one. Now that she has this one under her belt, I think Saturday could be something special.

I'm really looking forward to seeing Vanessa. I think she gets a bad rap for being too 'perfect.' She is much different than Sarah (or Yuan Yuan or Masha or Lorena). Her performances are so powerful and physical. The photographer Edward Weston one remarked that his photographs aren't representations and should be viewed as 'the thing itself.' I see Vanessa's performances this way. I try to look at what she is doing - as the thing itself - and not as a representation of something else.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: San Francisco Ballet: 2010 Season
PostPosted: Thu Jan 28, 2010 9:56 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12093
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Becca Hirschman reviews the Tuesday, January 26, 2010 performance in the San Francisco Appeal.

SF Appeal


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: San Francisco Ballet: 2010 Season
PostPosted: Fri Jan 29, 2010 11:15 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2009 5:08 pm
Posts: 10
Rachel Howard reviews Wednesday's performance.

http://www.sfcv.org/news-reviews/reviews/8870


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: San Francisco Ballet: 2010 Season
PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2010 11:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Apr 19, 2004 11:01 pm
Posts: 167
I saw Sarah Van Patten's Odette/Odile this afternoon. It was a memorable performance, full of feeling, vulnerability, subtle drama--and a touch of delicious wickedness. It made this, my least favorite Swan Lake, a pleasure to watch (only great dancing can redeem this muddled production). It was also a special treat to see Nutnaree Pipit-Suksun dancing again, this time in three demi-solos: the pas de trois in Act I , Swan Maiden in Act II, and Russian Princess in Act III. I have missed her, and look forward to seeing a lot of her this season--may it be injury free. (Allan Ullrich is right: she's been on the verge of a major breakout practically since the day she arrived here.)


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: San Francisco Ballet: 2010 Season
PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2010 10:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12093
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Alastair Macaulay reviews "Swan Lake" in the New York Times.

NY Times


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: San Francisco Ballet: 2010 Season
PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2010 12:04 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Apr 19, 2004 11:01 pm
Posts: 167
I knew Macaulay was in town to review Swan Lake, and I was actually dreading what he would tell the nation. In fact I think this an astute assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of SFB. I do think the company can and does "blaze" in contemporary works. But "story ballets" re-choreographed by HT, are indeed problematic--and they outsell contemporary ballet, the choice of dancers and reviewers, by a large margin.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 96 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 7  Next

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group