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 Post subject: New York City Ballet: 2009-10 Winter Season
PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2009 6:53 pm 
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Posts: 3377
Location: Canada
With the winter season not too far in the future, the first news is that of some well earned promotions:

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/ ... ty-ballet/

To principal:

Robbie Fairchild
Tyler Angle (when was the last time NYCB had THREE sets of siblings as principal dancers?)

Teresa Reichlen
Amar Ramasar
Tiler Peck

To soloist:
Kathryn Morgan

I wonder if this foretells some more retirements beyond Darci Kistler. Certainly it wouldn't be entirely shocking is Albert Evans, Philip Neal, Charles Askegard or Nilas Martins retired in the next year. Same for Yvonne Borree, and Benjamin Millepied has a lot on his plate other than dancing.
New corps members"

Chase Finlay
Callie Bachman
Amy Barker
Sam Greenberg
Kristin Segin


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2009 6:54 pm 
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Location: Canada
New York City Ballet Announces 2009/2010 Season

In Honor of Lincoln Center’s 50th Anniversary NYCB to Present a Year-Long Retrospective of its Unparalleled Repertory

The Winter Season Will Showcase Five of NYCB’s Full-Length Ballets as Well as World Premieres by Peter Martins and Alexey Miroshnichenko and Classic Works by George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins

The Spring Season Will Celebrate the Company’s Extraordinary Commitment to New Work Featuring Seven World Premiere Ballets and Four Commissioned Scores

Choreographers Creating Ballets for the Spring Season Include Melissa Barak, Mauro Bigonzetti, Peter Martins, Wayne McGregor, Benjamin Millepied, Alexei Ratmansky, and Christopher Wheeldon With Commissioned Scores by Bruno Moretti, Thierry Escaich, Jay Greenberg, and Esa-Pekka Salonen

Acclaimed Architect Santiago Calatrava Will Also Collaborate On the 2010 Spring Season

In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, which has been New York City Ballet’s home since 1964, for its 2009/2010 season NYCB will present a yearlong celebration of the Company’s unparalleled repertory.

The season will begin with the Opening Night Benefit on Tuesday, November 24, which will mark NYCB’s first performance in the newly renovated David H. Koch Theater, and will feature a world premiere ballet by Peter Martins to John Adams’ Naive and Sentimental Music. A longtime champion of contemporary American music, this will be Martins’ ninth ballet to a score composed by Adams.

The Opening Night Benefit will be followed by the annual holiday season of George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker™, from Friday, November 27, through Sunday, January 3. The eight-week winter season will open on Tuesday, January 5, and will showcase five of the full-length ballets in the Company’s repertory – A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo + Juliet, The Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake, and Jewels -- along with 11 classics by George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins, and a world premiere by Russian choreographer Alexey Miroshnichenko.

The spring season, which will feature performances of 40 different ballets, will open on Tuesday, May 4, and be highlighted by an extraordinary celebration of New York City Ballet’s unparalleled commitment to new choreography featuring world premiere ballets by Melissa Barak, Mauro Bigonzetti, Peter Martins, Wayne McGregor, Benjamin Millepied, Alexei Ratmansky, and Christopher Wheeldon. During the course of the eight-week spring season, seven of the weeks will feature a world premiere.

Four original scores have also been commissioned for the new ballets from: Bruno Moretti, who will work with Bigonzetti, his long-time collaborator; French composer Thierry Escaich, who will work with Millepied; young American composer Jay Greenberg, who will create the score for the Barak ballet; and Esa-Pekka Salonen, who composed a violin concerto for Martins’ spring season world premiere which has been co-commissioned by NYCB, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, where the score premiered in April.

In addition, the acclaimed architect Santiago Calatrava will also collaborate with NYCB during the 2010 spring season festival of new choreography.

Opening Night and George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker™
The season will begin with NYCB’s annual Opening Night Benefit, which will take place on Tuesday, November 24. This evening will mark the first NYCB performance in the newly-renovated David H. Koch Theater.

Created for George Balanchine and New York City Ballet, the theater opened on April 20, 1964, and was originally called the New York State Theater. It was the second theater to open at Lincoln Center, and is currently undergoing an $86 million renovation, the first phase of which will be completed in October 2009, with the official re-opening scheduled for the New York City Opera Opening Night Gala Concert on November 5. The theater was renamed the David H. Koch Theater in 2008 in recognition of Mr. Koch’s $100 million gift to the theater’s capital campaign.

In addition to the Adams/Martins world premiere, the Opening Night Benefit will feature other works from the NYCB repertory to be announced at a later date.

Following the Opening Night Benefit, NYCB will begin its annual holiday season of George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker™ on Friday, November 27, with 47 performances through Sunday, January 3.

One of New York’s most beloved holiday traditions, the production premiered on February 2, 1954, it has been seen in New York every year since, and has been performed by NYCB more than 2000 times. Set to Tschaikovsky’s glorious score, Balanchine’s staging of The Nutcracker, which he knew from his childhood in Russia, established the ballet and its score as perennial favorites in the United States.

Winter Season
NYCB’s winter season will begin on Tuesday, January 5, with a performance consisting of the new Adams/Martins work, as well as George Balanchine’s Who Cares?, and will continue with 56 performances through Sunday, February 28.

The winter season will be highlighted by a world premiere ballet by Russian choreographer Alexey Miroshnichenko, which will premiere at the Company’s annual New Combinations evening on January 20. Each year since 1997, NYCB has presented a world premiere ballet on, or around, January 22 to honor the anniversary of Balanchine’s birth.

Miroshnichenko, who is a ballet master and dancer with the Maryinsky Ballet, was previously scheduled to create a ballet for NYCB’s 2009 winter season. Due to complications with the music rights for the ballet’s score, Sergei Prokofiev’s Chout Suite, the premiere was postponed. For the 2010 season Miroshnichenko has decided to create a new ballet using a score by Russian composer Rodion Shchedrin, husband of the legendary ballerina Maya Plisetskaya.

The winter season will also be highlighted by performances of five of the full-length ballets in the NYCB repertory. They will include George Balanchine’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Jewels, and Martins’ stagings of The Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake, and Romeo + Juliet.

In addition to the full-length works, the winter season will also feature performances of eight Balanchine ballets including Agon, Firebird, Prodigal Son, Tschaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 2, and the return on Cortège Hongrois, last performed in 2005; as well as performances of Jerome Robbins’ Fancy Free, Dances at a Gathering, and West Side Story Suite.

Spring Season
NYCB’s spring season, which will feature performances of 40 different ballets, will be highlighted by an extraordinary celebration of new music and choreography, featuring seven world premiere ballets and four commissioned scores, which are being created in honor of the 50th anniversary of Lincoln Center. Since relocating to Lincoln Center in 1964, NYCB has premiered more than 300 original works, making the Company by far the most prolific creator of new work at the performing arts complex.

For the 2010 spring season, which will open on Tuesday, May 4, new ballets will be created by Melissa Barak, Mauro Bigonzetti, Peter Martins, Wayne McGregor, Benjamin Millepied, Alexei Ratmansky, and Christopher Wheeldon. This will mark the first time that McGregor, the resident choreographer of London’s Royal Ballet, has created an original work for an American company. Commissioned scores will be created by Bruno Moretti, Thierry Escaich, Jay Greenberg, and Esa-Pekka Salonen.

The celebration of new choreography will also feature a special collaboration with the internationally-renowned architect Santiago Calatrava. The Spanish born Calatrava is one of the world’s elite architects, and is internationally acclaimed for structures that are said to suggest flight. He is best-known for his dazzling public projects, such as bridges, stadiums and train stations in various cities around the world, and is currently designing a new transit hub at the World Trade Center site in lower Manhattan.

In addition to the world premiere ballets, the 2010 spring season will include performances of 33 other works, including 21 ballets by George Balanchine and 7 by Jerome Robbins.

Spring Season World Premieres Ballets
Melissa Barak – Commissioned score by Jay Greenberg
Currently a member of the Los Angeles Ballet, Barak is a former NYCB dancer, and has previously created If by Chance (2002) and A Simple Symphony (2009) for the Company. For her spring season world premiere Barak will create a ballet to a commissioned score by Jay Greenberg, the young American composer who has been compared to such musical prodigies as Mozart, Mendelssohn and Saint-Saëns. Still a teenager, Greenberg is the youngest composer ever signed to exclusive contracts with IMG and Sony Classical, and this will mark his first score composed for dance.

Mauro Bigonzetti – Commissioned score by Bruno Moretti
The former Artistic Director of Italy’s Atterballeto where he is now principal choreographer, Bigonzetti has choreographed three works for NYCB -- Vespro (2002), In Vento (2006), and Oltremare (2008). For his new work, Bigonzetti will collaborate with Bruno Moretti who has been commissioned to create a new score for the ballet. Former colleagues at the Rome Opera Ballet, where Bigonzetti was a dancer and Moretti a pianist, they have worked together on numerous ballets, including all three of Bigonzetti’s previous works for NYCB.

Peter Martins – Commissioned score by Esa-Pekka Salonen
NYCB’s Ballet Master in Chief Peter Martins will create a new work to a violin concerto by Esa-Pekka Salonen, which was co-commissioned by NYCB, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, where the score premiered in April 2009. Salonen wrote the score for the acclaimed Canadian violinist Leila Josefowicz, who will perform the concerto for all performances of the ballet. The Finnish-born Salonen is one of the music world’s most acclaimed conductors and composers, and was most recently the Music Director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic. For the ballet’s world premiere, Salonen will conduct the NYCB Orchestra.

Wayne McGregor – Score to be announced
British choreographer McGregor was appointed resident choreographer of London’s Royal Ballet in December 2006, and is also the artistic director of Wayne McGregor/Random Dance, a resident company of London’s Sadler’s Wells Theater. This will be McGregor’s first work for NYCB, and will also mark the first time that he has created an original piece for an American company. He has also created work for the Paris Opera Ballet, Nederlands Dans Theater, and Stuttgart Ballet, among others. Score to be announced.

Benjamin Millepied – Commissioned score by Thierry Escaich
A native of Bordeaux, France, Millepied is a principal dancer with NYCB, as well as a choreographer who has created works for American Ballet Theatre, Paris Opera Ballet, Pacific Northwest Ballet, Mikhail Baryshnikov, and Grand Théâtre de Genéve, among others. This will be his second work for NYCB, and will be created to a commissioned score by the acclaimed French organist and composer Thierry Escaich, who is currently the composer in residence for the Orchestra National de Lyon.

Alexei Ratmansky – Score by Edouard Lalo
Born in St. Petersburg Russia, and trained at the Bolshoi Ballet School, Ratmansky is currently the artist in residence at American Ballet Theatre, and is the former artistic director of the Bolshoi Ballet. In addition to those two companies, as a choreographer he has also worked with the Maryinsky Ballet, Royal Danish Ballet, and San Francisco Ballet, among others, and has previously created two works for NYCB – Russian Seasons (2006) and Concerto DSCH (2008). For NYCB’s 2010 spring season, Ratmansky will create a ballet to French composer Edouard Lalo’s Namouna.

Christopher Wheeldon – Score to be announced
British-born Wheeldon is currently the artistic director of Morphoses/The Wheeldon Company, and was previously NYCB’s first-ever resident choreographer, creating 16 works for the Company. Wheeldon has also created works for the Bolshoi Ballet, The Royal Ballet, and San Francisco Ballet, among others. Prior to becoming NYCB’s resident choreographer, Wheeldon also danced with the Company for seven years. This work will mark Wheeldon’s first new ballet for NYCB since leaving the Company in 2008. The score for the new Wheeldon work will be announced at a later date.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2009 6:55 pm 
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New York City Ballet and New York City Opera Unveil The Completed Renovations of Their Shared Home, The David H. Koch Theater

NEW YORK, NY, October 22, 2009 – Peter Martins, Ballet Master in Chief of New York City Ballet, and George Steel, General Manager and Artistic Director of New York City Opera, today unveiled the results of the renovation of their shared home, the David H. Koch Theater, which is located on the campus of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. The $107 million renovation, which began in July 2008, was undertaken through a joint initiative of the Ballet and the Opera to refurbish and modernize their historic home—the former New York State Theater, designed by Philip Johnson Associates and inaugurated in 1964—enhancing both the artistic and visitor experience.

The project is funded through a $200 million joint capital campaign undertaken by the Ballet, the Opera and City Center of Music and Drama. The theater was officially renamed in honor of the $100 million lead gift from David H. Koch. The capital campaign has also received major contributions in the amount of $26.9 million provided by the City of New York through the Department of Cultural Affairs, with support from the City Council and the Manhattan Borough President.

“I am thrilled by the completion of this truly unprecedented project, which maintains the integrity of George Balanchine’s and Philip Johnson’s vision for the theater while adding significantly to the comfort, accessibility and artistic capabilities of the building,” stated Peter Martins. “In many ways, both subtle and apparent, this renovation will provide a much-improved experience for performers and audiences alike.”

“Today we celebrate both a great legacy and an exciting new beginning,” stated George Steel. “From the depths of the orchestra pit up to the seats in the fourth ring, the David H. Koch Theater has been refashioned for today and for the future, ensuring that the theater is a beautiful space where opera and ballet will flourish for years to come.”

Speaking at the preview event, Kate D. Levin, Commissioner, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs commented: “New York City Ballet and New York City Opera are better poised than ever before to serve 21st century artists and audiences, thanks to the public-private partnership that made these renovations possible. The new David H. Koch Theater will help ensure that New York City remains a destination for cultural visitors from around the corner, and around the world.”

The theater has undergone a number of acoustical enhancements including the enlargement of the orchestra pit, the installation of a mechanical lift and modification of the stage apron. These changes allow the orchestra to play in the pit at any depth, or as high as stage level for concert performance. This new flexible pit both increases the presence of the orchestra’s sound in the theater, and improves conditions for onstage performers, who will benefit from a clearer and more direct exchange with the conductor and orchestra. Other acoustical interventions, including the removal of carpet from the floor and rear walls of the auditorium and the addition of new acoustic side walls near the proscenium, have also been made to improve the musical experience for the audience. Thanks to these interventions, the electronic acoustic enhancement system installed in the theater since 1999 has been removed.

The renovation also brings the David H. Koch Theater into the 21st century with the installation of dynamic new media capabilities including a complete onsite media suite with all equipment necessary for the capture and distribution of high-definition images and digital sound of performances, rehearsals and any other activities taking place in the theater. The suite also includes digital storage capabilities for materials captured by the new system, as well as materials from the Ballet and Opera archives. The theater itself is now outfitted with a number of robotic, remote-controlled cameras, as well as approximately 60 broadcast service plates located throughout the theater, providing maximum flexibility for temporarily installing and changing camera positions as needed.

Enhanced amenities for audiences at the newly renovated David H. Koch Theater include two new side aisles that have been created on the Orchestra level and entirely new seats that have been carefully tested for sound absorption. The redesign of the orchestra level maintains the integrity of the theater’s original seating plan and retains its generous 40-inch legroom and unparalleled sightlines. The new side aisles were carved out of the orchestra’s previous layout without altering the arc of the rows. The renovated theater has a total capacity of 2,586, including new prime spaces for patrons with disabilities.

Additional improvements include the refurbishment of restrooms; installation of a new and upgraded lighting system; refurbishment of the dressing rooms; and installation of a new heating, ventilation and air-conditioning system. The Box Office has also been refreshed with a new façade, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, incorporating images of opera and ballet.

While these improvements will benefit audiences of the Ballet and Opera first of all, they also will enhance the experience of other users of the theater throughout the year.

New York City Opera will present its first performance in the David H. Koch Theater on November 5, 2009, on the occasion of its American Voices opening concert, marking the company’s return to the stage and the start of the 2009/2010 season, the first under the direction of George Steel. New York City Ballet will hold its Opening Night Benefit in the David H. Koch Theater on November 24, 2009, when it will mark its first performance in the renovated theater with a world premiere ballet by Peter Martins to a score by John Adams.


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet: 2009-10 Winter Season
PostPosted: Sun Dec 27, 2009 8:46 am 
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The promotion of Erica Peirera to soloist was mentioned in the NY Times over the holiday.


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet: 2009-10 Winter Season
PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2010 7:52 pm 
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Starting this fall, there will be a month of repertory before the Nutcracker!! They will be cutting the winter and spring seasons by two weeks. The new schedule seems to be better for the dancers - a break after Nutcracker and more, shorter seasons, and better for audiences - we don't have such a long gap (July - December) without repertory. Also, the spring season won't overlap so much with ABT.

Tentative dates for the first year with new seasons:

14 September – 10 October
(Nutcracker: 30 November 2010 – 2 January 2011)
18 January - 27 February 2011
3 May – 12 June 2011

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/ ... r-win-win/
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/07/arts/ ... allet.html


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet: 2009-10 Winter Season
PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2010 7:04 am 
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Review of the winter season opening night:

Quote:
Opposites Onstage, Opening a Season

By GIA KOURLAS
Published: January 6, 2010

In the current vogue of ballet programs arranged by theme (All Tchaikovsky! Love stories! Leotard ballets!) it’s easy to pine for the old days, when works with seemingly little in common lent a certain hot-and-cold balance to a night at Lincoln Center. On Tuesday evening the New York City Ballet opened its winter repertory season with such a disparate double-header: Peter Martins’s “Naïve and Sentimental Music,” followed by George Balanchine’s “Who Cares?” from 1970.


More here


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet: 2009-10 Winter Season
PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2010 3:22 pm 
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Leigh Witchel reviews the Tuesday, January 5, 2010 opening program of NYCB's 2010 Winter Season in the New York Post.

NY Post


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet: 2009-10 Winter Season
PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 1:23 pm 
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Claudia La Rocco reviews the Wednesday, January 6, 2010 performance of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" in the New York Times.

NY Times


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet: 2009-10 Winter Season
PostPosted: Sat Jan 09, 2010 7:52 pm 
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Apollinaire Scherr reviews the Wednesday, January 6, 2010 performance of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" in the Financial Times.

Financial Times


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet: 2009-10 Winter Season
PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2010 1:45 pm 
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Robert Johnson reviews the Tuesday, January 5, 2010 mixed bill and the Wednesday, January 6, 2010 "A Midsummer Night's Dream" in the New Jersey Star-Ledger.

NJ Star-Ledger


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet: 2009-10 Winter Season
PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 2:57 pm 
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In the New York Times, Claudia La Rocco reviews the Wednesday, January 13, 2010 performance of Peter Martins' "Romeo + Juliet."

NY Times


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet: 2009-10 Winter Season
PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2010 12:00 pm 
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In the Village Voice, Deborah Jowitt reviews Peter Martins' "Naive and Sentimental Music" and Balanchine's "Who Cares?"

Village Voice


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet: 2009-10 Winter Season
PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 7:24 pm 
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In the New York Times, Roslyn Sulcas interviews choreographer Alexey Miroshnichenko about his new work, "Lady With the Little Dog," opening on Wednesday, January 20, 2010 at the David Koch Theatre.

NY Times


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet: 2009-10 Winter Season
PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:35 pm 
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In the New York Times, Alastair Macaulay reviews the Saturday, January 16, 2010 performance of "Fancy Free," "Prodigal Son" and "Firebird."

NY Times


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet: 2009-10 Winter Season
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 6:58 pm 
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Leigh Witchel reviews "Fancy Free," "Prodigal Son" and "Firebird" in the New York Post.

NY Post


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