public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Sun Dec 21, 2014 11:20 am

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Mark Morris Dance Group 2008
PostPosted: Fri May 16, 2008 2:52 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12651
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
The Mark Morris Dance Group is in Seattle performing "L'Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato" at the Paramount Theatre, sponsored by the Seattle Theatre Group, with an orchestra comprised of Seattle Symphony members and conducted by Seattle Symphony Music Director Gerard Schwarz.

R. M. Campbell previews the performance in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer:

Seattle P-I

Michael Upchurch in the Seattle Times:

Seattle Times


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2008 8:42 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 27, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 1845
From Karen Campbell in the Boston Globe:
Quote:
A new life for a fabled ballet
....
But until [Prokofiev’s] archives were unsealed in 2003, 50 years after his death, few people realized that the ballet we know and love is far from what the composer originally intended.

Enter Mark Morris’s new “Romeo & Juliet, on Motifs of Shakespeare.” Scheduled for its world premiere at Bard SummerScape July 4-9 by the Mark Morris Dance Group with the American Symphony Orchestra under Leon Botstein, this is probably the hottest dance event of the summer.

More...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 2:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12651
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Reviews of L'Allegro at Seattle's Paramount Theatre from Friday, May 16, 2007.

R. M. Campbell in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer:

Seattle P-I

Michael Upchurch in the Seattle Times:

Seattle Times


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2008 6:39 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 27, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 1845
From Lloyd Schwartz in the Boston Phoenix:
Quote:
Maestro! - Interview: Mark Morris picks up the baton

Next week, the Celebrity Series of Boston brings back Mark Morris’s dance setting of Henry Purcell’s 17th-century English opera Dido and Aeneas. .... Morris himself will lead the Orchestra and Chorus of Emmanuel Music, the first time he’s conducted in Boston.

More...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2008 7:11 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 27, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 1845
From David Weininger in the Boston Globe:
Quote:
Morris’s next step is with a baton
....
In a way, going from choreographer to conductor wasn’t such a huge leap, Morris says, given the intensive care he puts into the musical side of his productions. “Basically, I end up training conductors for my needs in a particular piece of music in the form of my choreography,” he explains. “

More....


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2008 6:52 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 27, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 1845
By Thea Singer in the Boston Globe:
Quote:
Reimagining ‘Dido and Aeneas’

.... this rendition of “Dido” - with Amber Darragh in the dual role of Queen/Sorceress on Wednesday night - may suit Morris’s stylized, ritualistic choreography even better than the original. ... in this production, both female leads have shrunk; they now fit neatly into the frame of the work as a whole. Morris has, as if casting a bas-relief in reverse, brought the chorus - 10 members of the Mark Morris Dance Group - to the fore.
More from the Globe


By Keith Powers in the Boston Herald:
Quote:
Shorter, sparcer ‘Dido’ opera will leave audiences satisfied
....
Hard on the heels of the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s epic presentation of Berlioz’ Dido opera, comes the Mark Morris/Emmanuel Music version of Purcell’s opera, “Dido and Aeneas,” ....

The Morris Dido could not be more different than Berlioz’, even though the story has the same mythological roots.
More from the Herald


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 31, 2008 9:12 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 27, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 1845
Jeffrey Gantz' review in the Boston Phoenix: [url=http://thephoenix.com/article_ektid62372.aspx]Altar and ego - Mark Morris’s Dido and Aeneas
[/url]


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2008 6:52 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 27, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 1845
From Marcia Siegel in the Boston Phoenix:
Quote:
Dido’s fate - Mark Morris at the Majestic

....
For his production, now almost 20 years old, [Morris] devised a modern masque for dancers in black sarongs and sleeveless tops. What’s “authentic” about this Dido and Aeneas is its formal movement style and the choreographic interaction of chorus and principals. And the fact that it honors the music even though the fine singers and orchestra of Emmanuel Music, conducted by Morris himself, were out of sight of the audience.

More...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2008 6:40 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 27, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 1845
From Janine Parker in the Boston Phoenix:
Quote:
Young and Old - Mark Morris at Tanglewood

.... The program promised a breezy evening of dancers waltzing and viewers sighing to Brahms and Schubert (with a bit of Barber thrown in to keep everyone sharp). Performed one way, it could have been too much waltzing and sighing, too much pretty. Of course, the Morris youngsters have much to offer; the point is that the presence of company veterans infuses MMDG with a maturity that both grounded and lifted this presentation to a higher plane.

More...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2008 6:16 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 27, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 1845
From Debra Cash in the Boston Phoenix:
Quote:
Modern Romantics - Mark Morris’s Romeo & Juliet ...

Mark Morris’s displaced romanticism is the perfect high-art solution for our times. Morris believes in happy endings, but he probably doesn’t trust them. He reveres great music but shields us from its passions with caricature and formal gesture. In his new production of Romeo and Juliet, the subject is love, but the word always has quotes around it.

More...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2008 4:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 8612
Location: El Granada, CA, USA
Mark Morris' R&J is coming to the SF Bay Area.

From the Contra Costa Times.

Quote:
Dance: Mark Morris brings new version of 'Romeo and Juliet' to Berkeley
By Ann Murphy
Contra Costa Times Correspondent
Article Launched: 08/31/2008 12:02:45 AM PDT
Mark Morris is the obvious story of any season — audiences love the man's deceptively simple dance style, which is as easy to read as a 1930s cartoon, and often as clever.

Easy or not, the power of Morris' art is that people from ages 8 to 80 can imagine letting the urge overtake them, hopping onstage and joining the dancers as they gambol through space like a population of fellow celebrantors. Viewers have their urge to dance ignited, then satisfied, by Morris' band of movers. That very kinship, unthinkable with, say, the Olympian dancers of San Francisco Ballet or Merce Cunningham's troupe, is what makes the 52-year-old choreographer, after decades of success, such a darling still.



more...


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 11:41 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 8612
Location: El Granada, CA, USA
I'll be posting my review soon. In the mean time, you can read Rita Felciano's review in the SF Bay Guardian.

Quote:
Raging hormones
Mark Morris takes on Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet
BY RITA FELCIANO
Wednesday October 1, 2008

REVIEW Romeo and Juliet — the ballet, not the play — is not exactly known for its wit. Prokofiev's heavy-handed use of thematic material at times makes Wagner sound frivolous. But leave it to Mark Morris to turn ballet's most beloved 20th-century tragedy into a fairy tale whose comedic overtones are difficult to miss. Does the piece — which was given its West Coast premiere by Cal Performances at Zellerbach Hall Sept. 25 — work? Up to a point it does, because Morris set clearly defined parameters and shaped his take accordingly. At the end, however, the choreographer falls flat on his face.

Morris' Romeo and Juliet, on Motifs of Shakespeare is the result of musicologist Simon Morrison's discovery of the composer's original manuscript in Russia. It doesn't include a balcony scene, nor do the lovers die. The most welcome revelation is that the music was not designed to hit you over the head. The orchestration is thinner, shading its colors instead of splashing them on.


more...


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 23, 2008 2:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12651
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
In The Times, Debra Craine interviews Mark Morris on the subject of his "Romeo and Juliet" in which his company will appear at London's Barbican Theatre, November 5-8, 2008:

The Times


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2008 2:54 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12651
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Clement Crisp did not enjoy Mark Morris' "Romeo and Juliet" at the Barbican. His review in the Financial Times:


Financial Times


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Romeo and Juliet
PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2008 2:47 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jul 01, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 711
Location: Rugby, UK / Taipei
‘Romeo and Juliet, On Motifs of Shakespeare’ - Mark Morris Dance Group
Barbican Theatre, London; November 8, 2008.


It is not commonly known that the Prokofiev score for “Romeo and Juliet” that we all know and love is significantly different to the original, the changes being made following requests by Leonid Lavrovsky in 1940. But let’s get one thing straight. Mark Morris’ “Romeo and Juliet” is neither a restoration nor a reconstruction of the original. Rather it is what composers Simon Morrison and Gregory Spears call a ‘historical recovery’ in which they have removed the 1938 additions, reordered what was left, and scored a happy ending based on Prokofiev’s manuscript annotations.

While this makes the work interesting musically, as a piece of dance it is far from remarkable. The additions stretch performances to a little over three hours, which Morris sometimes struggles to fill with equally interesting choreography. There seems to be a lot of padding and repetition of steps, and at times an awful lot of walking. This was especially true in the ballroom, where the “Dance of the Knights” lost almost all its usual power. Most disappointingly though, he has succeeded in removing much of the emotion and created a “Romeo and Juliet” where we just don’t care for the lovers, here danced by David Leventhal and Rita Donahue.

The work does have its moments. Morris has come up with some nice ideas. One of the most interesting is casting of two women, Amber Darragh and Julie Warden, as Mercutio and Tybalt. Dancing in men’s dress, they brought an interesting dynamic and a different intensity to their roles. Both gave us much lighter characters than we are used to seeing. Warden’s Tybalt was much less unsavoury than usual, although still spoiling for a fight, while Darragh showed a nice sense of fun.

Elsewhere, John Heginbotham’s Friar Laurence was much more prominent than priests in most other versions. Both scenes in the church were well constructed, especially when Juliet collects her potion. As elsewhere, Morris takes a very naturalistic approach. Even though the Friar explains in detail what will happen, the choreography allows Juliet to show us her real fears and doubts and following his advice.

Morris has dispensed with the well-known balcony. Instead, the two lovers return to the now deserted ballroom. It’s an idea that works in the sense that it is a place full of memories of their first meeting. And the duet does start promisingly as the couple circle and mirror each other, repeating steps from their earlier encounter. Again, the natural approach is to the fore, Morris choosing not to use the traditional embraces and soaring lifts seen in ballets. But it never really goes anywhere. There was a feeling that love was there somewhere but it was hidden away. The emotion never really broke the surface.

The bedroom pas de deux at the beginning of Act III was much better. Morris has the almost naked lovers moving playfully on and around the bed, making clever use of the bright red bed sheet. For the first time we really got a sense of two people who very much care for each other.

The happy ending is not a problem in itself. Indeed, the best of all the duets was that which immediately followed Juliet waking up from her drugged stupor. In another change, she has not been moved to the crypt but is still in her bedroom. Romeo reappears through the window and the pair cement their love. But the mood and feeling was then completely destroyed by a long scene change, after which the curtain rises to reveal the star crossed lovers in a dreadfully corny, saccharin-sweet, starry universe. Instead of the usual powerful ending, we are then presented with a final duet that does nothing to enhance the work and leaves a strange feeling of emptiness.

There are other issues. The way Morris has Juliet slowly collapse into a drugged sleep as the potion takes hold and as the wedding guests arrive laden with gifts is powerfully done. Sadly, what then follows is a series of mostly forgettable divertissements. Only a dance for the men, to the familiar mandolin music, lived on in the memory.

The fight scenes also leave something to be desired. Morris has opted for wooden swords of the type young children might play with. The result is something that is neither realistic, odd in itself given his approach elsewhere, nor abstract.

All the action takes place in Allen Moyer’s wooden panelled set that gives a contemporary feel while not losing a sense of time and place. It worked as both an indoor and outdoor space, each set of vertical panels sometimes opening to provide additional entrances and exits. Moyer also makes clever use of model buildings to represent the town.

I do like Mark Morris’ often irreverent approach to dance and life. He and his associates should be commended for their work with the score and trying a different approach. Romeo and Juliet is not an unpleasant way to while away three hours. Morris is often an inventive dance-maker. But apart from odd moments, and the interesting things that have been done with the score, his “Romeo and Juliet” is ultimately disappointing and rather unfulfilling.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group