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 Post subject: San Francisco Ballet 2007 Program 5
PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2007 10:01 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 12:01 am
Posts: 350
Location: San Francisco
Initial casting:

PROGRAM 5 Opening Night
3/15/2007,8 PM

PACIFIC
Piano: Roy Bogas
Violin: Roy Malan
Cello: David Kadarauch

Nicolas Blanc*, Tina LeBlanc
Ruben Martin*, James Sofranko*, Steven Norman
Muriel Maffre, Courtney Elizabeth*, Brooke Taylor Moore*, Maureen Choi*

-Pause-

CAROUSEL (A DANCE)
Conductor: Martin West

Sarah Van Patten*, Pierre-François Vilanoba*
INTERMISSION

THE FIFTH SEASON
Conductor: Martin West

Yuan Yuan Tan, Tiit Helimets
Lorena Feijoo, Davit Karapetyan
Sarah Van Patten, Pierre-François Vilanoba

INTERMISSION
FANCY FREE
Conductor: Martin West

Pascal Molat*, Garrett Anderson*, Gonzalo Garcia*
Vanessa Zahorian*
Erin McNulty*, Elana Altman*


PROGRAM 5 Matinee
3/17/2007,2 PM
PACIFIC
Piano: Roy Bogas
Violin: Roy Malan
Cello: David Kadarauch

Gennadi Nedvigin, Frances Chung*
Garrett Anderson*, James Sofranko, Steven Norman
Muriel Maffre, Courtney Elizabeth, Brooke Taylor Moore, Maureen Choi

-Pause-
CAROUSEL (A DANCE)
Conductor: Martin West

Dores Andre*, Joan Boada*
INTERMISSION
THE FIFTH SEASON
Conductor: Martin West

Nutnaree Pipit-Suksun, Pierre-François Vilanoba
Lorena Feijoo, Davit Karapetyan
Rachel Viselli, Ruben Martin

INTERMISSION
FANCY FREE
Conductor: Martin West

Benjamin Stewart*, Rory Hohenstein*, Ruben Martin*
Sarah Van Patten*
Courtney Elizabeth*, Mariellen Olson*



PROGRAM 5 Evening
3/17/2007,8 PM
PACIFIC
Piano: Roy Bogas
Violin: Roy Malan
Cello: David Kadarauch

Nicolas Blanc, Tina LeBlanc
Garrett Anderson, James Sofranko, Steven Norman
Muriel Maffre, Courtney Elizabeth, Brooke Taylor Moore, Maureen Choi

-Pause-
CAROUSEL (A DANCE)
Conductor: Martin West

Dana Genshaft*, Ruben Martin*

INTERMISSION

THE FIFTH SEASON
Conductor: Martin West

Yuan Yuan Tan, Tiit Helimets
Katita Waldo, Gonzalo Garcia
Sarah Van Patten, Pierre-François Vilanoba

INTERMISSION
FANCY FREE
Conductor: Martin West

Pascal Molat, Garrett Anderson, Gonzalo Garcia
Vanessa Zahorian
Erin McNulty, Elana Altman


* Designates premiere in a role.
Casting subject to change.

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So two dancers walked into a barre...


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2007 10:43 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 12:01 am
Posts: 350
Location: San Francisco
From fanciful 'Carousel' to prowling sailors in 'Fancy Free,' Ballet's offerings delight
Rachel Howard, Special to The San Francisco Chronicle
Saturday, March 17, 2007

Quote:
On paper, the big news for San Francisco Ballet's Program 5 on Thursday was the company premiere of "Fancy Free," the charming 1944 ballet that launched Jerome Robbins' career, and indeed it looked delightful. But delight was in abundant supply well before this sweet tale of sailors on shore leave arrived to cap the evening. There are three other ballets on the bill, all of them mighty fine, and finely danced. A pleasanter time could not be had at the Opera House.

Part of the gratification is sheer variety. Mark Morris' "Pacific," the opener, is windswept and magisterial; Christopher Wheeldon's "Carousel (A Dance)" (like "Fancy Free," a company premiere) is romance and glee. The return of Artistic Director Helgi Tomasson's elegantly brooding "The Fifth Season" lends the program a melancholy gravitas. It was also a big night for the passionate young soloist Sarah Van Patten, who ought to be given a chance to steal the spotlight more often.


For more, go here.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2007 10:44 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 12:01 am
Posts: 350
Location: San Francisco
More casting announced:


PROGRAM 5 Evening
3/20/2007,8 PM
PACIFIC
Piano: Roy Bogas
Violin: Roy Malan
Cello: David Kadarauch

Nicolas Blanc, Tina LeBlanc
Garrett Anderson, James Sofranko, Steven Norman
Elana Altman*, Courtney Elizabeth, Brooke Taylor Moore, Maureen Choi

-Pause-
CAROUSEL (A DANCE)
Conductor: Martin West

Sarah Van Patten, Pierre-François Vilanoba

INTERMISSION
THE FIFTH SEASON
Conductor: Martin West

Yuan Yuan Tan, Tiit Helimets
Katita Waldo, Gonzalo Garcia
Rachel Viselli, Ruben Martin

INTERMISSION
FANCY FREE
Conductor: Martin West

Benjamin Stewart, Rory Hohenstein, Ruben Martin
Sarah Van Patten
Courtney Elizabeth, Mariellen Olson




PROGRAM 5 Evening
3/21/2007,7:30 PM
PACIFIC
Piano: Roy Bogas
Violin: Roy Malan
Cello: David Kadarauch

Gennadi Nedvigin, Frances Chung
David Arce, Jaime Garcia Castilla*, Rory Hohenstein*
Katita Waldo, Sarah Van Patten*, Dana Genshaft*, Vanessa Zahorian*

-Pause-

CAROUSEL (A DANCE)
Conductor: Martin West

Dana Genshaft, Ruben Martin

INTERMISSION
THE FIFTH SEASON
Conductor: Martin West

Nutnaree Pipit-Suksun, Pierre-François Vilanoba
Lorena Feijoo, Davit Karapetyan
Rachel Viselli, Ruben Martin

INTERMISSION
FANCY FREE
Conductor: Martin West

Benjamin Stewart, Rory Hohenstein, Ruben Martin
Sarah Van Patten
Courtney Elizabeth, Mariellen Olson

* Designates premiere in a role.
Casting subject to change.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2007 2:42 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12415
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Janos Gereben reviews the program in the San Francisco Examiner:

SF Examiner


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2007 11:33 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 20, 2006 2:46 pm
Posts: 17
Location: Saratoga, New York
To quote Mr. Gereben: "Nutnaree Pipit-Suksun and Davit Karapetyan (my new favorites this season) danced marvelously, she reflecting sleek beauty, he expressing strength and elegance."

Sorry to inform Mr. Gereben, but Nutnaree and Davit were replaced Saturday mat by Yuan-Yuan and Tiit. No wonder he enjoyed their performance. I hope he watched the rest of the program more closely.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2007 11:45 am 
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Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 8612
Location: El Granada, CA, USA
Who is this guy? I've never heard of him before. Has the Examiner hired a new hack?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2007 1:12 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 05, 2004 12:01 am
Posts: 81
Location: San Ramon High School
oops!! my, oh my...how embarrassing for Mr. Critic :oops:


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2007 2:45 pm 
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Posts: 350
Location: San Francisco
Janos writes (or used to, I'm not sure) for San Francisco Classical Voice (music-based). I didn't know he was also a dance critic...

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2007 10:11 pm 
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Posts: 407
Location: Where little cable cars climb halfway to the stars
Program Five, San Francisco Ballet, War Memorial Opera House, March 20, 2008

The words “Mixed Bill” couldn’t be more apt to describe the enticing sampler San Francisco Ballet presents in Program Five. There is something for everyone and all of it danced superbly. Mark Morris’ “Pacific” premiered in 1995 at the UNited We Dance international festival on this same stage. Its title holds out hope for a regional world without national borders, but also implies a wish for peace if “pacific” is also an adjective. Roy Bogas on piano, Roy Malan on violin, and David Kadarauch on cello, play an evocative, if counterintuitive score by Lou Harrison. Against a blue-lit backdrop, three men in blue-to-white watercolor explore the space between and around them with stylized port de bras and tight jumps. Three women, then a fourth enter in green-to-white skirted costumes and execute a quiet advance downstage. They proceed to uncover the workings of a dynamic contrary to the men’s, describing lateral movements on three levels, after which they assume sculptural poses just before each breaks out into lunges that squish to a halt as the piano dips deeper into the bass range. A man and a woman in red-to-white watercolor take their measure of the space to violin accompaniment, and we see a simple, yet richly rewarding adagio—a push-pull taffy confection that turns from sweet to poignant as the dancers arch out in opposite directions to form a parentheses. Her own weight gives in to gravity as Elana Altman drops to the floor, and the music changes again to support a Rondo, as the blue-to-white and green-to-white dancers rush in. Altman, the red-to-white woman has shown us a range of movement choices and tops it off with a jaunty jig-like dance. Couples rally to her tempo in arabesque to fouetté reverses and piqué arabesques. The piece comes to its conclusion as dancers in all hues join together to reprise the theme they brought to the stage to begin with and then circle in a swirl of color and movement, finally breaking out into a horizontal line where intertwined arms weave the dancers and their colors into a continuous bough of colors.

Christopher Wheeldon’s “Carousel (a Dance)” is a précis of the Broadway musical “Carousel.” It opens to a backdrop that at first glance looks like a batik orange slice, and then as strung colored lights reveal themselves, we see that it is suggestive of a Ferris wheel—not quite a carousel, but its kissing cousin. Strings of dancers in striking knee-length contemporary dresses paneled in deep-toned complementary colors for the women with men in jeans and dark blue shirts striped with colors corresponding to the women’s panels parallel the loose-hung drape of the lights. They fall to the floor, clump up in clusters, showing us—depending on whether you’re orientation is urban or rural—a fairground or an amusement park. Both venues can be scarily deliberate in their determination to amuse, and Wheeldon has captured that Ferris Bueller’s Day Off in Purgatory duality. For me it called up my father’s instruction when I was 14 forbidding me to go off on an adverture with my friends to Coney Island’s Steeplechase Park. I disobeyed and found myself in that “forbidden garden” that Sarah Van Patten finds herself in. Her partner here is Pierre François Villanoba, and it must be said that he is perfectly suited to her. For the most part, her self-consciousness melts away in his expert arms, and she lets herself find her depth. The “If I Loved You” pas de deux is not quite “If I Did It,” per O.J. Simpson, but does nonetheless bare its edge. Van Patten shows us the conundrum of the 14-to-16-year-old with larceny in her loins and terror in her heart. In the denouement of her pas de deux with Villanoba, she totally loses her reluctance, and it could be taken as a metaphor for her career so far at San Francisco Ballet. The dancers are classical ballet dancers and so some balances are held a little long for this application (if only they could have been held as long in “Sleeping Beauty” two weeks ago!), and instead of smiles that should have come from the entire body one saw the stock pasted-on ballet ones that say, “I can’t believe that we’re doing Broadway.” Still, the dancing was full-out marvelous and the audience loved it and not because the company dropped its artistic level to accommodate a lower-on-the-food-chain genre of “entertainment,” but because it showed us jazz ballet without cheapening a single step.

Helgi Tomasson’s “Fifth Season” is a brilliant piece of choreography that meshes flawlessly with Sandra Woodall’s temperate, but museum quality sets and costumes, made dazzling by Michael Mazzola’s inventive lighting. Karl Jenkins’ soulful score that includes String Quartet No. 2 and Largo from “Palladio,” along with Tomasson’s choreography pushes “Fifth Season” into the fourth dimension. We are looking through a beige cut-out modernist wall/window interior onto a steel and concrete urban landscape, where grey commercial buildings are smudged either by pollution, myopia or because of something that prevents us from seeing them as distinct entities in a culture that belches them out like so much sooty smoke. The first movement, “The Fifth Season” presents Katita Waldo and Gonzalo García in a divinely jovial partnership. They emerge out of darkness into light also in grey—a clean steely grey, made steelier because of sparkles in the detail of their costumes. They gad about in grand jeté, refreshing the stage with hi def candor and frolic, a kind of playful rebuke to the darkly serious musical accompaniment. Couples offer a prelude to the entrance of Yuan Yuan Tan and Tiit Helimets, the first of the two “Waltz” couples. Helimets folds Tan into him and then she steps into high pas de cheval, and they show us impeccable delicacy framed by perfect timing. Ruben Martín squires Rachel Viselli as the second “Waltz” couple. Their dynamic is so big that it seems to frighten them off of acknowledgment by letting their eyes meet—too powerful to punctuate. In “Romance,” Waldo and Garcia return to finish each other’s sentences, or phrasing, her left arm cradling his head, imprinting an unforgettable image. He folds her around his neck, her arms rising cupola like on either side. Viselli waxes languorous in “Tango” in a brief solo after which she is joined by three men. Helimets does a succession of jumps across a diagonal downstage, García gives us his signature off-balance passés, and Martín offers poses that are toreador-tight.

Tan and Helimets return in “Largo,” Tan making a slow entrance downstage until she is joined by Helimets in an adagio which bounds from stretch lift to stretch drag and then a lift where she is carried for eight or so counts across the stage. Tan and Helimets open and close their bodies like valve tappets. Her épaulement predicts her movements; her head might as well be the violin’s bow. It all adds up to poignancy for which there is no remedy except its counterpoint: athleticism, and it comes in the form of an interlude of corps dancers dressed in blue slate costumes who perform calisthenics-like jumps to accelerated rhythms. Katita and Gonzalo enter in a teasing duet of rounds of fast footwork. Rachel and Ruben, flush in their reprise, enjoy a scamper across the stage followed by Tiit and Yuan Yuan breezing back into view as this urban legend danced by a seasoned, virtuosic comes to a close.

Jerome Robbins’ “Fancy Free” to music by Leonard Bernstein danced on a set designed by Oliver Smith unrolls the tale of three sailors on leave who compete with each other for the attentions of two women. It is a nice closer because it gives three of the company’s male dancers, Rory Hohenstein, Ruben Martin and Benjamin Stewart a chance to show off some high-toned jazz dancing, and rhythm work. Jerome Robbins’ choreographic humor is always a pleasure to take in and antic delivery by the men as well as Courtney Elizabeth and Sarah Van Patten makes for a light treat on the heels of “Fifth Season.” We see high stepping double saut de basques, hornpipe jigs, double tours that end in splits to the floor and an entire repertoire of stage jousting that might be the only combat these poseurs actually see.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2007 10:24 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 07, 2006 12:13 am
Posts: 36
Location: San Francisco
Saratoga wrote:
To quote Mr. Gereben: "Nutnaree Pipit-Suksun and Davit Karapetyan (my new favorites this season) danced marvelously, she reflecting sleek beauty, he expressing strength and elegance."

Sorry to inform Mr. Gereben, but Nutnaree and Davit were replaced Saturday mat by Yuan-Yuan and Tiit. No wonder he enjoyed their performance. I hope he watched the rest of the program more closely.
Actually, Davit danced with Lorena as the first couple in The Fifth Season. Nutnaree was supposed to dance with Pierre-Francois.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 11:42 am 
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Posts: 17
Location: Saratoga, New York
Herminator, you are correct. Davit danced with Lorena in 5th season with Tiit and Yuan Yuan called in at the last minute. Does anyone know if Nutnaree's injury is serious? Let's hope not.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2007 10:08 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2004 12:01 am
Posts: 350
Location: San Francisco
Thirstquenchingly good
SF Ballet
Program 5
March 23, 2007, 8PM

San Francisco Ballet’s season is quickly cresting past the halfway mark, and Program 5 swelled this Friday evening with four contemporary yet differing works.

The evening’s highlight proved to be the debut of Christopher Wheeldon’s “Carousel (A Dance)” to the music of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musical of the same name. Sarah Van Patten and Pierre-François Vilanoba, as the young lovers, transformed the stage from sheer performance into an alluring story, and a well-danced one at that. Wheeldon, breaking out of his Balanchine-esque ways, choreographed an enjoyable vision to watch, and as the couple’s relationship grows, you almost want to giggle giddily along with Van Patten as she realizes she’s in love. The orchestra, conducted by Martin West, swayed confidently through the score, and the corps’ human carousel at the end (oh, what a spectacle!) adds an extra “oomph” element to “Carousel,” all the more reason to relish and bathe in the sweet moment.

Mark Morris’ “Pacific” glided to and fro with a freshness matched only by Lever 2000. Bodies leaped and arched in succession, reminiscent of the ocean on a clear day. Tina LeBlanc and Nicolas Blanc (filling in for an injured Gennadi Nedvigin) displayed warmth and intimacy as the red couple; him lifting her as though she were a continuation of his arms, and she graciously reaching to him as she twisted into a stretched out attitude. Elana Altman, as one of the four “green women,” provided grandeur and tranquility as she jetéd and swirled about.

Not to be outdone, Helgi Tommason’s “The Fifth Season,” to music by Karl Jenkins, returned to the stage with a punch. Katita Waldo looked in fine form with her long limbs jutting forwards and a cool demeanor as she tapped her foot, and Gonzalo Garcia matched her well in both presence and style. Van Patten and Vilanoba moved their way across the stage with a ballet-based tango that would put “Dancing with the Stars” to shame. Yuan Yuan Tan and Tiit Helimets, as the third couple, connected softly throughout Sandra Woodall’s art gallery-like space. The corps, though, was poorly costumed and unfortunately served no purpose other than to add eight more bodies to the already well-crafted space.

Rushing in like high tide, Jerome Robbins' “Fancy Free” progressed quickly and assuredly. The three giddy sailors (Gonzalo Garcia, Garrett Anderson, and Pascal Molat) had only two things on their mind: girls and girls. With all their might, they competed in their own little dance-off: a battle of jumping, sliding, time-stepping, and posing all for the chance to get a girl. Erin McNulty, clutching a scarlet purse, had great attitude (even with an unfortunate stumble early on), and clad in violet, Vanessa Zahorian daintily humored the men in white. And yet just when the guys think their shore leave has been a bust, in strolled Elana Altman to boost their egos once more.

Cool and hydrating, Program 5 quenches your thirst for edge, variety, and solid dancing. Let’s hope the rest of the season lives up the bill.

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So two dancers walked into a barre...


Last edited by RaHir on Thu Mar 29, 2007 10:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 26, 2007 3:09 pm 
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Posts: 22
Sunday matinee on Program 5 did not start out well. The cast of "Pacific" seemed far too inward, as though each was dancing alone to an iPod. No one stood out, and little energy crossed the footlights. The steps were there, of course. Before the performance Betsy Erickson described how much this dance requires attention to counts, and I found myself counting along instead of enjoying. It wasn't the "Pacific" I've seen in the past. It isn't unusual for the first dance at Sunday matinees to take a few minutes to "catch," but this one never did.

Ah, but then Boada and Andre sent sparks throughout the theater with their roles in "Carousel." Boada displayed a hint of danger alongside his seductive gestures. Andre traversed the shift from hesitant and naive to full erotic enjoyment in a gradual and fully believable way. Here was perfect casting, well-supported by everyone else. Boada's final leap audacious onstage as the carousel was underway provided the perfect punctuation to his role.

Fifth Season featured Feijoo with Karapetyan, Viselli and Vilanoba, and Tan with Helimets. Ditto what others have posted about these performers in this appealing work. I couldn't help thinking how hints of past invited choreographers were creeping into Helgi's design.

The surprise in "Fancy Free" was classically pure Karapetyan's easygoing humor and absorption of American gestures. Matthew Stewart tossed off the first solo with thrilling abandon. Sofranko oozed the more langorous second solo, while Karapetyan snapped fingers and clapped and swayed his hips to delicious results. Pauli Magierek and Mariellen Olson had their first performances as Passers-by, and distintively captured the personalities of each character. Quinn Wharton adeptly maintained the thankless role of Bartender, proof that "there are no small roles in the theater."


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 12:30 pm 
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Location: El Granada, CA, USA
Yes, and Quinn is no small dancer either. I expect great things from him.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2007 10:29 am 
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Just want to add that, while it may not be the "correct" reaction, I enjoyed Carousel more than anything else I've seen this season. I saw the Saturday afternoon cast with Dores Andre and Joan Boada and agree with previous comments. I had noticed Andre in the corps this season. One of the great things about following a company is watching the younger dancers develop. This is a ballet I will want to see over and over.


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