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PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2007 5:53 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
Dark Invader
by DEBORAH JOWITT for the Village Voice
published: February 6, 2007

Robbins was never happy with the ballet. He had pruned away most of the narrative devices he'd experimented with during rehearsals, along with many props. After the premiere, he took scenes out, then put them back. Finally, in 1980, he reduced Dybbuk to A Suite of Dances, excising the principal characters and all semblance of plot. When Kirstein wanted him to revive the original Dybbuk in 1986, he refused, saying Bernstein's music had turned out to be too dramatic for what he'd had in mind. The fact that Robbins was working in George Balanchine's company, where the prevailing aesthetic was to let music and dancing alone tell whatever stories a spectator might care to imagine, certainly affected him, and Kirstein's turn down 20 years earlier still rankled...
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2007 4:29 pm 
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Location: Canada
Quote:
Visions Nostalgic and Utterly Fresh

By ROSLYN SULCAS
Published: February 12, 2007
NY Times

When applied to ballet, the word contemporary can mean anything from works created reasonably recently to more abstract notions of modernity. A range of those notions was on offer at the New York City Ballet’s first performance, on Friday night, of “Contemporary Quartet,” a program of four ballets from 1969 to 2006.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 2:46 am 
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Location: Canada
Quote:
Adventures in Geometry and Color, as Well as Dancing

By ROSLYN SULCAS
NY Times
Published: February 16, 2007

Of all the titles that the New York City Ballet has come up with for its new fixed programs, “For the Fun of It” sounds the silliest. But as it turns out, this program, presented for the first time on Wednesday night, is one of the most persuasive groupings that the company has so far presented — and it makes a strong case for being able to see this particular set of works together again. (For those not following City Ballet’s policy decisions with bated breath, the company previously performed ever-changing combinations of ballets, rotating through about 40 works a season.)


here


I think the positive nature of the above review might suggest that doom and gloom below was a little melodramatic... I think the point about the dancers being tired is probably right on target, but she seems to miss the obvious point that tired dancers can lose the train of a ballet pretty quickly...

Quote:
Dancers, and Their Company, Held Down by Gravity

By CLAUDIA LA ROCCO
Published: February 15, 2007

New Yorkers are adept at running themselves ragged, so perhaps it’s only fitting that a company that bears the city’s name should put its dancers through such grueling paces. Still, while 38 different ballets over eight weeks may be impressive, wan dancers aren’t, and on Tuesday night the company looked exhausted.

This wasn’t so problematic at first: exhaustion actually suits Christopher Wheeldon’s “Klavier,” a dark exploration of the moment when opulence overripens to decadence. Set to the sensuous, disquieting Adagio Sostenuto from Beethoven’s “Hammerklavier” piano sonata in B flat, Op. 106, which was performed by Susan Walters, the ballet unfolds (or perhaps collapses) in a destroyed ballroom, as conjured by Jean-Marc Puissant’s giant fallen chandelier.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2007 3:03 am 
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Location: Canada
This reviewer sees falls as a problem. There have always been falls at NYCB. I don't know if this season really has been unusual, but I've always felt that falls are a sign that dancers are pushing it - you can't go over the edge if you don't dance right up to the edge. I'd rather a few falls than a stage full of hesistant dancers.

From the NY Times:

Quote:
A Pinch Hitter Reveals, and a Magnetic Pair Revel

By GIA KOURLAS
Published: February 19, 2007

New York City Ballet was full of surprises on Friday, but the most alarming involved the evening’s conductor, Maurice Kaplow, who suddenly fell ill before the final ballet on its new program, “A Banquet of Dance.” (A company spokesman said his illness did not appear to be serious.) With no one available to conduct “Evenfall,” Christopher Wheeldon’s ballet set to Bartok’s Piano Concerto No. 3, Cameron Grant played the entire composition on solo piano.

Mr. Grant’s fine performance shifted the mood of the ballet, a grand work for 18 corps dancers and two principals. It was as if the raw nerves of Mr. Wheeldon’s choreography were exposed, emphasizing the work’s faint hint at loss with quivering, somber fragility.


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 Post subject: but this season has more falls.
PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2007 2:05 pm 
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Location: Shanghai
I have seen nearly 10 falls in the past 4 weeks


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2007 2:12 pm 
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Location: El Granada, CA, USA
10 falls in a month seems excessive and possibly a sign of other problems like not enough rehearsals or a bad floor. I have trouble believing that NYCB's techinical director and production manager would allow a bad floor.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:11 pm 
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Location: Canada
I would suspect it's a combination of a very young corps, lack of rehearsals and long days.

I've often felt that some people look down at the 'short' rehearsal days of many European companies, but then, you don't see many falls over there. What, one has to wonder, is the cost of rehearsing until 6pm or later and then dancing in a performance. And doing it 6 days a week for two or three months at a time.

Kate


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2007 5:13 pm 
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Location: Canada
A couple of apprentices have recently received their corps contracts:

Brittany Pollack
Courtney Muscroft

Also a fond farewell to Miranda Weese who made her last appearance with the company last week.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 3:22 pm 
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Location: Seattle, WA, USA
The inimitable Robert Gottlieb writes about the last week of the Winter Season in the New York Observer:

NY Observer


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2007 5:53 pm 
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Location: Canada
Depatures at NYCB:

Melissa Barak
Edwaard Liang

Both have been well reviewed for their choreography, so one wonders if they've left to devote more time to their choreographic endeavours.

Barak is listed as a member of the new Los Angeles Ballet as is former NYCB apprentice Lauren Toole. Elizabeth Walker is listed, though she is still on the NYCB roster, so she's either splitting her time between companies or there are two dancers by the same name.

Also on the roster are former SAB students Avichai Scher and Masahiro Suehara, who guested with NYCB during the Nutcracker.

Kate


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