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 Post subject: Differences between classical and contemporary ballet
PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 3:44 am 
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Joined: Fri Dec 01, 2006 4:04 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Student
Hello everyone

I'm final year student majoring in Interior Architecture and Design. As part of my final year design project, i am designing Ballet School and using movement through classical and contemporary ballet.

i have no knowledge/ background regarding ballet, so i would really appreciate it if you could tell me the differences between classical and contemporary ballet i.e. unique features, techniques, etc...

Thanks

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Dk Suzie
Interior Architecture & Design Level 4
Nottingham Trent University


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2007 10:56 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 25, 2002 11:01 pm
Posts: 678
Location: Petaluma, California
Hello, dksuzie...Probably, your local library would be a resource as well as the internet. I googled "contemporary ballet" and found this article:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern_ballet

Classical ballet follows the more traditional form regarding ballet steps (enchainement), stories, etc., represented by ballets such as "Swan Lake", "Sleeping Beauty", and so on. There is also "neo-classical" ballet as represented, as an example, by the works of George Balanchine. This is really very basic information on my part, but I did want to respond to your request. Your project sounds very interesting and creative. Good luck to you...


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2007 11:02 am 
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Joined: Fri Dec 01, 2006 4:04 pm
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Hi Gina,

Thank you for the reply. I really appreciate it. Yes, i manage to find the differences between classical and contemporary ballet but thought it would be nice to hear some response and experiences from those who are more experienced in this field.

Anyways, i'm having an interim review on this project next week so hopefully it goes well. :)

Thank you once again .. :)

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Dk Suzie
Interior Architecture & Design Level 4
Nottingham Trent University


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2007 12:16 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 25, 2002 11:01 pm
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Location: Petaluma, California
Hi, again....Are you designing a ballet school with studios, dressing rooms, offices, etc.? Would you like feedback on what is important to have in a building that houses a ballet school? Perhaps, we could provide some feedback on this with our experience?


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2007 12:20 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 01, 2006 4:04 pm
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Hi Gina,
Yes, exactly. I am designing a ballet school.

That would be really helpful if you could do that so i could double check what important and whats not..

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Dk Suzie
Interior Architecture & Design Level 4
Nottingham Trent University


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2007 2:02 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2001 11:01 pm
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Location: El Granada, CA, USA
Ample dressing room space and a place for students to be dropped off by their parents and a place for parents to wait for thier students are all essential.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2007 6:52 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 25, 2002 11:01 pm
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Location: Petaluma, California
A comfortable lobby or a room for parents to wait is really, really important in a "dream" ballet school. It's a complaint I have heard very often from those all-important parents, and this was one of the most important components of the new school for which I now teach when the founder was in the planning and remodeling phase. A faculty lounge is also very nice for the teachers. We have a video corner where students can watch ballet DVD's while they wait for their class, or inbetween classes. The students all seem to enjoy this...I think a ballet library is a wonderful idea, as well. It need not be a separate room, but just bookshelves where students can peruse books and magazines relating to dance and theater. Storage for costumes is very essential if it can be worked into the plan....Another area for the "dream" ballet school would be an exercise/physical therapy room for the dancers containing Pilates equipment, mats, etc. and a physical therapist/trainer who has a background working with athletes! :)


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2007 11:01 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 23, 1999 11:01 pm
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Location: SF CA
A great heating system, and ample bathroom space.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2007 6:46 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2001 11:01 pm
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Location: El Granada, CA, USA
Sprung floors in huge studios with ample storage closets built into the sound absorbing walls.


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