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 Post subject: Galops
PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2005 1:52 am 
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Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2003 11:01 pm
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Location: Australia
I would very much love to hear from teachers out there in cyberland on the subject of teaching the breakdown of teaching galops to the very young student. 3-7 year old. In particular, galops: forwards and sideways. also how you would teach this particular age group the concept of spatial awarness. thanking you all in advance for your wonderful replies. very much appreciated.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2005 1:56 pm 
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Joined: Fri Feb 28, 2003 12:01 am
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Well, first of all, I call them "chasse's" not gallops. (Unless you're talking about a different step than I'm thinking of.) We take turns going in pairs--when they go across the room with the right leg in front, they hold their right arm en haut, and their left hand is on their hip. Reverse for left leg. To teach them sideways, we do it paired up holding hands and facing each other. Remind them to look at their partner, and this helps keep them from twisting to the front. I don't really break it down for them, as they can copy me pretty accurately. If I ever do have a problem with someone not catching on, I suppose I would have them practice sous-sous at the barre, and then explain that they need to make a sous-sous in the air, and the back leg "chases" the front leg.

Hope this helps! :)

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 11, 2005 9:42 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2003 11:01 pm
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Location: Australia
thank you wild rose for your feedback very much appreciated. sous-sous is a brilliant idea not just for this age group but right across the board. What do you think some of the common faults would then be? So far I have:

lack of spatial awareness
lack of plie and use of the floor which is very important
toes that are not pointed. incorrect footwork.
bent knees en l'air
throwing of the body back/forwards
shoulder and arm movement
twisting bodies (especially de cote)
not commencing the exercise with a hop
lack of ballon

Please feel free to add on or as per usual - thoughts, comments, observations to be added. :P


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 13, 2005 11:36 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 25, 2002 11:01 pm
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Location: Petaluma, California
For this age group, I would think that chasses going sideways at first might be the best way to go...


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2005 7:05 pm 
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Location: Australia
Thank you Gina.
I too personally teach chasse first (for sideways galops) and usually at the barre to begin with to double check on alignment and placement, correct turnout, balance, centre, poise etc. I then move onto teaching on the diagonale and sideways the very same way as wild rose previously mentioned (in pairs holding hands). sous sous is a great visual to explain one foot chasing the other. (I too use this one to help give a visual to forward galops). I personally refer the side gallops as the feet kissing in the air with toes pointed. (the younger students love this visual and think it is quite naughty to be talking about kissing and usually end in a fit of giggles). We also concentrate on spatial awarness but without compromosing the correct placement and alignment (twisting bodies). :)


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2006 8:38 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 08, 2004 11:01 pm
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Location: NC, USA
Hi! Been away from the site for awhile... had a baby :D
Spangles... I teach galops and chasses as different steps. To borrow terms from modern dance training: I teach galops like a overcurve and chasses with an undercurve. Galops are great for young ones in pre-ballet, but I save the chasse until students are older. Galops are great for locomotor rhythm, I introduce them stepping side, together and repeat. then stepping side and jump together. Then continuous. To feel a nice stretch of the legs in the air, I will also have them step side together staying up on demi-pointe. The chasse I teach with a slide (good use of plie) instead of a step. Both galop and chasse have the same positions in the air, and the feeling of 'chasing' the leading leg. Executing these at the barre, and in pairs is great to avoid twisting of the body. With little ones sometimes it helps to have their belly buttons facing a particular wall or person... hope this helps.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 1:45 am 
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Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2003 11:01 pm
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Location: Australia
absolutely helps and can't wait to try out all suggestions on my Tiny Toes classes. I guess the common factor with all suggestions here is the importance of BREAKDOWN. (I usually have one of these at the end of the Tiny Toes (3-5 year old class). :lol:
It is also very important and especially for new/young teachers to recognise fatigue when teaching such steps as galops and to recognise when to change the direction of the class and when to stop. cheers xx


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 1:46 am 
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Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2003 11:01 pm
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Location: Australia
PS. congratulations Chrismohn on the birth of your beautiful baby :D


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 22, 2006 3:07 am 
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Joined: Mon Jul 26, 2004 11:01 pm
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Location: france
Hi!
I've just read this topic, and I want to add something: I'm a french teacher, and here galop and chassés are two different steps. Galop is like a saut de chat but not turn out (just like a horse !!). Could you explain what is exactly for you galop and chassés? (Excuse me for the bad english I speak!) :?


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2006 7:04 pm 
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Location: NC, USA
I call a galop in parallel like you are describing a 'pony galop' picking up bent knees through parallel retire positions. Then galops de cote with staright legs together at the top of the jump; with more of a bouncy up and over feel. And chasses with good sliding and use of plie, with a down and up feeling. the chasses actually catch the feet together, where the galop kind of knocks the leading leg away (if that makes any sense...)


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