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 Post subject: Kabuki great in Berkeley
PostPosted: Tue Jun 14, 2005 11:33 am 
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Posts: 8612
Location: El Granada, CA, USA
From the SF Chronicle. I wish I could go, but I have rehearsal. I hope someone else goes and tells me all about it.

Quote:
BERKELEY
'Beautiful boys' in an elaborate Kabuki performance
'Love Suicides at Sonezaki' playing Zellerbach Hall
Charles Burress, Chronicle Staff Writer

Tuesday, June 14, 2005

To understand why a 73-year-old actor who's lecturing in Berkeley tomorrow night has been designated a "Living National Treasure" in Japan, it helps to know the sex change that happened to Kabuki right after it was born.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2005 5:29 pm 
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Location: El Granada, CA, USA
From the SF Chronicle.

Quote:
REVIEW
Kabuki tale of lovers' suicide needs no translation
Robert Hurwitt, Chronicle Theater Critic

Monday, June 20, 2005

The acting is as immediate as it is timeless in its precision, presence and grace. The tragedy takes root in small gestures and eloquent tableaux to expand with inexorable force. The same actors who bring impressive gravity to the tragedy can execute wondrously rollicking slapstick comedy with both hands tied behind their backs. In fact, the comedy is all the funnier because one actor has both hands tied behind his back and the other's arms are bound spread-eagle to a long pole.

The extraordinary art of Grand Kabuki was on display Friday and Saturday at Zellerbach Hall, courtesy of Cal Performances. It was a more exceptional treat than the rarity of Grand Kabuki visits might indicate.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 13, 2005 12:32 am 
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Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 6778
Location: Estonia
Quote:
Kabuki Dance British Museum, London
by CLEMENT CRISP for the Financial Times

Ganjiro's art is that of the onnagata player, devoted to female roles, and he is a uniquely magnificent actor. For his British Museum display, Ganjiro gave a celebratory dance, Shimo No Senzai, telling of the art of a medieval travelling courtesan who appears disguised as a nobleman (with movement in severe, ritualistic style) before throwing off her masculine robes to reveal her actual identity in faster and more yielding dance.

published: September 13, 2005
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 Post subject: Kasane @ Sadler's Wells
PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 3:25 am 
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Posts: 6778
Location: Estonia
Quote:
Kabuki
by JUDITH MACKRELL for the Guardian

In impressive contrast, Ebizo also stars in the programme's first work, Fuji Musume, the Wisteria Maiden - but he undergoes an exquisite transformation into a young woman. This is a near abstract solo dance, in which Ebizo displays the full fluttering coquetry of a girl in love, his wrists delicately lifted, his glance sliding shyly, his fabulous kimono proudly displayed.

published : June 1, 2006
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 4:04 am 
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Posts: 6778
Location: Estonia
Quote:
Thoroughly modern sexiness
by CLIFFORD BISHOP for the Sunday Times

Unlike most virile single actors, Ichikawa Ebizo XI tries to discourage the giggling flocks of female admirers who hang around after performances — although, if he fails, he should at least be able to outrun them. “My grandfather was handsome,” he says, “and had a lot of fans. Now they are old ladies, but they love me because I look like him.”

published: May 28, 2006
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 4:53 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
Know your kimonos
by LUKE JENNINGS for the Observer

As the drama progresses into an increasingly involved tale of adultery, murder, body-concealment, facial disfigurement and eroticised horror, a radio-linked voice quietly translates and decrypts, dripping the plot like poison into your ear. An experience that would otherwise have been beautiful but bemusing is thus translated into flamboyant and compelling drama (I can't help thinking that the same thing might prove helpful for those new to classical ballet, with its ritualised stories and elaborate mime sequences).

published: June 4, 2006
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 5:36 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
Kabuki, Sadler’s Wells, London
by CLEMENT CRISP for the Financial Times

Ebizo is undeniably skilled, alert in manner, but I missed a quality of inevitability that suggests there is no other way the feelings and movements could be better expressed, which I have seen in performances by a supreme onnagata artist, Nakamura Ganjiro III. (His solo during the British Museum’s Kabuki exhibition last autumn, in which he played a travelling courtesan impersonating a man – a treble bluff, a role within a role within a role – was one of the greatest dance performances I have ever seen.)

published: June 1, 2006
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 1:18 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
Odd and ossified
by CHARLES SPENCER for the Daily Telegraph

Though greeted with the cheers and standing ovation that are de rigueur for exotic foreign visitors to these shores, the whole evening struck me as odd rather than entertaining, and to be frank, something of an anti-climax.

published: June 2, 2006
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 6:23 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 27, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 1845
From Marcia Siegel in the Boston Phoenix (following a review of Fist and Heel):
Quote:
Neo-hoodoo and street kabuki
Fist and Heel at Concord’s Summer Stages and Kabuki in New York

I wouldn’t say Nakamura Kanzaburo XVIII’s Heisei Nakamura-za undersells kabuki tradition, but it’s a tricky balance the players try to effect. Kanzaburo ... continues a family line of kabuki actors that traces back four centuries. In the plays brought to New York, he dominated his troupe of actors and musicians, playing just about every type in the kabuki stylebook: warrior hero, refined female, ruffian, demon, low comedian.

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