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 Post subject: Adrienne Celeste Fadjo and ACFDance
PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2001 6:26 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
From the Boston Globe:

Young choreographer rises to the challenge
Quote:
By Thea Singer, Globe Correspondent, 12/15/2001
Adrienne Celeste Fadjo is a choreographer in search of her voice. Which, given that she's 22, is exactly where she should be. Her dances are experiments - attempts to try various forms on for size, from the narrative to the illusionary to the strictly entertaining. What's surprising is that her abilities seem to be inversely proportional to the difficulty of her undertaking; that is, the most ambitious of her dances is the most successful of the lot.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2005 7:32 am 
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Location: The Bronx is up; the Battery's down
Ms. Fadjo has since relocated to NYC, where her company, ACFDance, will premiere Home (presented with 2 other works) on November 3.

Goldman YMHA/YWHA
14th Street Y Theater
344 East 14th Street
at 1st Avenue, NYC
Thursday-Saturday,
November 3-5, 2005
Tickets: $15
General Admission
7:30 pm

Image

Disclaimer: I am the lighting designer for this production.


Last edited by salzberg on Fri Nov 04, 2005 6:36 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2005 9:47 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 22, 1999 11:01 pm
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Location: SF Bay Area
I was fortunate enough to take in a company rehearsal in NYC recently and I have to say I am a little surprised I hadn't heard about her before, as she seems to have a lot to say. I find Thea Singer's observation above consistent with my own -- at 22, Fadjo may have been a choreographer finding a voice. Four years hence she may have found it. As a boy brought up by a passionate mother and an even more passionate grandmother and aunts, I easily identified with the angst of female conflict within the rehearsed work.

If anyone goes to see the performance, let me know if you have the same assessment.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 03, 2005 7:06 am 
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Location: The Bronx is up; the Battery's down
One of the (many) interesting things about Ms. Fadjo's work is that her pieces tend to not have convenient, finite endings...because she's talking about real life, and in real life -- at least until we reach that most INconvenient of finite endings -- we tend to segue into and out of situations rather than neatly entering and exiting them.


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 Post subject: "Home" at 14th St. Theater
PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2005 4:14 pm 
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Adrienne Celeste Fadjo Dance
14th Street Y Theatre
November 3, 2005


Modern dance is a special art form. It is special in the fact that, for the most part, it has no real vocabulary of its own- it borrows and morphs steps from other dance idioms. (classic modern dance like Graham or Taylor notwithstanding.) Modern dance has the unique capacity to invent movement limited only by the imagination of the choreographer and the bodies of the dancers. Modern dance can interpret music and convey ideas by constructing its own language in which to do so. It seems much of what I have been seeing lately in the young emerging modern scene tends to sometimes sacrifice innovation for impact, clarity and form for the sake of striving to be different or obscure. Sometimes what I see is less dance than performance art, less vision than awkwardness. This is not to say that these movements are not valid, but seeing Adrienne Celeste Fadjo Dance perform, I was delighted to see dancers dancing. While Fadjo’s movement wasn’t exactly highly innovative and fresh, her sense of musicality and kinetic lushness was pleasing and enjoyable. She manages to convey concrete ideas and themes without losing the joy of movement in her work. She uses gesture and pantomime as a springboard for juicy, weighted and fluid dancing.

“Home”, which premiered this evening at the 14th Street Y Theater, explored the outward function and inner dysfunction of three suburban families and was performed to a medley of songs by Moby. The piece opened on a backdrop of three large paintings depicting three images of the inside of three different houses. In the opening scene we meet the three neighboring families- a happy suburban couple with two children, a work-a-holic man and his neglected wife, and a wife no longer interested in her sex starved husband. We see these families going about their business and begin to sense the thread of what threatens to unravel them. Traveling upstage on the diagonal, grandma and grandpa begin to walk. They are old, infirm, and painfully slow. As the music builds, grandpa takes grandma and begins a stiff waltz. Slowly their bodies begin to melt as the years seem to fall back, the dance reminding them of their youth and prime. Out of the wings their grandson comes to hand his grandmother back her cane, to remind her of her place, and with resignation and sadness, she takes up here cane, takes the arm of her husband, and begins their laborious walk back upstage. As they disappeared into the wings, I saw a silent tear slide down the cheek of Jessica Ingraham who played the part of the grandmother. It is a gem of a dancer who can become so emotionally involved in a role, not matter how small or short it is.

Using gesture and mime, Fadjo lets us see what is really going on in these seemingly normal families. The workaholic husband does an over the top pantomime of typing at a keyboard, his shoulders hunched to painful distortion, his fingers like claws pounding on an imaginary keyboard. The dutiful housewife endlessly puts food in and out of the oven, the uninterested wife applies makeup to avoid her husband. In their separate vignettes we see their struggle, yet when they get together for a neighborhood party, everyone is on their best behavior and their masks are back on. The movement is a mix of modern splashed with a hint of ballet and a dash of street dancing during the men’s fight scene. The dancers execute it smoothly and in time with the hypnotic sounds of Moby, but sometimes lack polish or form. Of special note in this piece were Allison Schaeffer and Tommy Noonan as the perfect suburban Couple in Pink. Mr. Noonan is a tall man who moves very softly and fluidly. Allison Schaeffer is clean and precise. Neha Anada as the uninterested wife has great presence and really involves her face in her dancing.
At one point the women begin to take on the men’s movement, and vice versa. The seamless switch of roles was an interesting comment on the gender structure in these families. “Home” ends not happily, but rather ambiguously, as often is the case in real life. The families are all back on stage again in their respective houses, going about their business as usual, assuming their normal roles no matter how dissatisfied we watched them become throughout the dance. Fadjo’s ability to portray this unsavory aspect of the human condition shows intelligence, sensitivity and the ability to rise to one of dances great challenges.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2005 1:17 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
Dancers Can't Rescue Choreography Not Ready for the Big Time
ACFDance
by TOBI TOBIAS for the Village Voice

She moves with more fluency and force than her delicate features would lead you to expect. Her choreography, alas, is unsophisticated — ingenuous, even. ... But while some of the dancers outclassed their material, the overall impression was that of work not yet at a professional level.

published: November 23, 2005
more...


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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2006 10:43 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 22, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 17498
Location: SF Bay Area
After the initial visit to the studio in October 2005 to view the company for the first time, I have since experienced the company in performance at WAXworks (see the post on WAX) and also accepted an invitation to a studio showing at Joyce Soho.

There is a certain naivete to the choreography that makes its completely accessible yet refreshing, Tobias' review notwithstanding. Not often do I get excited by a young talent but this is one of those times -- because of their collective youth, there is so much potential here artistically both in terms of choreography and dancing talent. I was so impressed that I signed up to be on their Board of Trustees, which will surprise many as I have a reputation for turning down such requests on about a weekly basis. What turned me is that there is also some very good business talent in this company, which makes my job that much more fun.


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