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 Post subject: Combining careers alongside dance
PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2005 6:36 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Dancer takes steps toward a big break
. . . but in the meantime she does PA work. By LISA GRAINGER for The Times

Most singers, actors and dancers, when they’re not treading the boards or “resting”, are forced to don an apron at night to make a living as a waitress or barmaid.

When 24-year-old Naomi Taylor came to London from Leicestershire to carve out a career as a dancer, she knew that she didn’t want to take that route.

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 Post subject: Re: Combining careers alongside dance
PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2005 7:05 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 12, 1999 12:01 am
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Location: The Bronx is up; the Battery's down
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Most singers, actors and dancers, when they’re not treading the boards or “resting”, are forced to don an apron at night to make a living as a waitress or barmaid.


The main assumptions here are based on stereotype.

I think it's fair to say that most aspiring performers are forced to work "civilian" jobs, but I'm not sure they're all, or even mostly, in the food service industry (many work as office "temps", a fact that was brought sadly home on 9/11/01), and I'd venture that most work during the day so that they may be free to rehearse/perform at night.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2005 9:47 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
My understanding is that circumstances are different on the two sides of the Atlantic, bearing in mind that this article is from the UK's Times newspaper. The pattern over here is for classes and rehearsals to be during the day, leaving dancers to find jobs which involve evening work. The majority of contemporary and ballet dancers, not on the roster of a major company, will be to do bar or restaurant waiting work at some stage of their careers.

One friend of mine used to work at mediaeval banquets where stage presence was a virtue and the hours and tips were good. I know another young dancer who works at a ticket sales agency during the day, but this does make for difficulties with the best pro classes, rehearsals, auditions and just being seen. Naomi Taylor is right when she says that she is lucky that her employer allows her time to attend auditions.


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