public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Wed Oct 22, 2014 4:02 pm

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Cunningham 'Events'
PostPosted: Thu Nov 23, 2000 6:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 4725
Location: Australia
From NY Magazine:

"As for the choreography, short stretches were boring as hell --- and the rest constituted a series of miracles."

http://www.newyorkmetro.com/nymetro/art ... iews/4121/

_________________
<BR>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Cunningham 'Events'
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2001 12:12 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
'The Age' reports on the Cunningham performance on the beach. I was hoping that we would read that they had performed 'Beach Birds', but then I am rather obvious. Instead the audience saw one of his Events, a mix of oldies and work in progress - we saw two when his Company were in London 2 years ago.

While extreme heat, dust and the threat of lightning forced the cancellation of several sporting events in Perth on Tuesday, New York's legendary Merce Cunningham Dance Company, one of the headline acts of the Perth International Arts Festival, which began last weekend, braved the elements to deliver a much-anticipated free performance at Cottesloe Beach.

There is also a preview of the festival and a discussion about the financial controversies that have been associated with it.

link no longer available


Last edited by Stuart Sweeney on Sat Jun 18, 2005 12:33 am, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2005 2:52 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 6778
Location: Estonia
Quote:
Merce Cunningham
Judith Mackrell
The Guardian

Serendipity has always been one of the ruling gods in Merce Cunningham's dance universe, especially when it comes to his staging of events.

published: June 15, 2005
more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2005 12:34 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Event - London, June 2005
By Gavin Roebuck for The Stage


Event is a series of six one-off performances celebrating the work of iconic contemporary dance choreographer Merce Cunningham. The dancers are exceptional and perform against a background of visual effects to newly composed music performed live every night. Each Event fuses these elements in a different combination, making every performance unique.

On the first night there was a projected background collage of black and white images by Richard Hamilton including a bicycle wheel no doubt influenced by the great artist Marcel Duchamp’s 1913 example.

click for more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2005 3:30 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 6778
Location: Estonia
Quote:
Merce Cunningham: Event, Barbican, London
by ZOE ANDERSON for the Independent

Cunningham dances can be powerfully dramatic. Holley Farmer looks up and out, a sweeping gaze in a single turn of her head. The movement is projected with such force, it looks fated: events unfold under her eyes.

published : 17 June 2005
more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2005 5:25 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Barbican Events 2005
The evergreen Merce Cunningham joins the dots between past and present, says Jann Parry for The Observer


Aged 86, Merce Cunningham is here to take a bow after each of the Events he presents at the Barbican (last one tonight). Each Event consists of selections from his 50-year-old repertoire. The combination of dances, designs and soundscores alters every night, so each performance is unique. You make your own connections, if you wish, between what you see and hear: the work is as up-to-date as you are.

click for more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2005 3:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 20, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 107
Location: London, England
Merce Cunningham Dance Company
Event
Barbican, London
17/06/05

A performance by the Merce Cunningham company would be an event, even if it wasn't named as such. At 86, Cunningham is still seemingly as excited by experimentation as ever. Apparently he rubs his hands with glee when people walk out of the theatre during his shows, which a few do tonight at the Barbican. And you sympathise with them, because being part of a Cunningham event can be hard work.

It is not Cunningham's choreography which is challenging. His dancers are the embodiment of divine abstraction, showing off precision placing, endless balances and balletic grace in ever-inventive phrases. When it comes down to it, Cunningham is a sucker for a beautiful line, a joyful leap and a playful duet. Here he has chosen sections from his vast repertory and strung them together to make a different work each night, but everything springs from a clearly defined physical language - there is order at work.

The risks Cunningham takes are all to do with the collaborating artists that go to make up a complete performance. Every night at the Barbican different artists and musicians are creating the set, costumes and music independently and joining together to see how their worlds collide.

Tonight's featured artist is Roger Hiorns who offers a set of what look like giant melting light bulbs lined up along the back of the stage. They turn out to be columns of foam which expand and topple during the performance.

Much more imposing is the music, mostly improvised live by composers John King, Stephen Montague and John Paul Jones (of Led Zeppelin). Their individual contributions join together to make a multi-layered beast of electronic rumbling, scratching, burbling and clanging, shot through with the occasional pounding riff or slice of silence. Bar a welcome appearance from a John Cage prepared piano piece there's little melody or coherent structure to be found.

While there’s nothing wrong with atonality, soundscaping, and improvisation in themselves, in tandem with Cunningham’s choreography this sonic onslaught at times feels absurd. There are moments where the dancers are spookily in sync with a rhythm or mood coming from the pit, but mostly the music grumbles and roars uncomfortably while the dancers banter, laugh, jig, muse and meditate.

While it’s a consuming game to try to find links and similarities between the music and movement, another angle is to work on separating the elements in front of you, to zone in on just what the dancers are doing, which, let’s face it, is what Cunningham did when he created it. To feel the inner rhythms of the dance, to get caught in a small sequence of repetition, to hone in on the real quality of the tiniest movement - this is often the most satisfying part of the experience. Never mind the bigger picture.

Cunningham’s risk-taking and his desire to engage with contemporary artists is admirable. He still asks questions about art and makes his audience do the same, but it doesn’t always pay dividends. Thankfully, despite all the surrounding hoo-ha, in the end it’s the dancing that makes this an event worth witnessing.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2005 9:20 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jun 06, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 1640
Location: London UK
Event
Merce Cunningham Dance Company
Barbican Centre
London
19th June 2005 (mat)


Each of the performances of “Event” are unique, with different sets and different musicians but the entire company of dancers. To quote from the programme: ‘The Events are a collage, made up of elements from the repertory and new material developed especially for the particular event’.

The backdrop is simple: a giant articulated comic figure, that rises almost imperceptibly, centimetre by centimetre into the flies, so that finally all that is visible is a pair of dangling calves (oddly the figure possesses no feet) leaving a glimpse of the empty backstage area.

The fourteen dancers, with both sexes dressed in identical all over tights in dark blue, make fast entrances and exits in a variety of combinations from full company to solo dancer, but returning again and again to three dancers occupying the stage as if the pas de trois were their default formation. Their energy levels must the highest in the dance world as this is all demanding stuff, 70 minutes without a break and looking as fresh at the end as when they started. They dance to a complicated montage of sound performed by a trio of musicians including a founder member of Led Zeppelin. Not everyone was captivated though as there were a few walking out throughout the afternoon.

Towards the very end of the work the dancers gather at the front of the stage miming the throwing of invisible dice, perhaps a reference to the random aspects of dancing in this eclectic piece. They then form a final tableau, rather reminiscent of “Dancers at a Gathering” or “Enigma Variations” where they pose for an invisible photographer.

Merce Cunningham is now eighty-six and beginning to look frail, leaning on a stick; he was gently led by one of his dancers to the corner of the stage. As soon as the audience caught sight of him the already heavy applause turned thunderous and all leapt to their feet. Living legends are few, but Cunningham is one who deserves the accolades.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2005 1:55 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
I've consolidated two topics:

Quote:
Merce Cunningham Dance Company
Judith Mackrell
The Guardian

Cunningham brings his company back to London for a season of six one-off performances whose choreography, score and set design all change radically from show to show.

published:June 11, 2005
more

****************************

Quote:
Merce Cunningham
Judith Mackrell
The Guardian

Serendipity has always been one of the ruling gods in Merce Cunningham's dance universe, especially when it comes to his staging of events.

published: June 15, 2005
more

****************************

Quote:
Soaring with the cloud-leapers
by ISMENE BROWN for the Daily Telegraph

Chance, if anything, increased my enjoyment, because, having had the bad luck to arrive just too late to take my stalls seat, I had to watch from the back of the circle. What serendipity. High and wide is where reception is clearest of Cunningham's wonderful possession of three-dimensional space, his injections of strict line and delicate, gravity-less motion over a floor that appears to be nothing less than a field of light, in which the dancers have a supra-human, bounding quality, like cloud-leapers.

published: June 16, 2005
more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2005 1:59 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
One we missed earlier.

Merce Cunningham
By Debra Craine for The Times


WHAT I’m about to write will be unique, because that is the special nature of a Merce Cunningham Event. Every Event is a one-off experience, with different choreography, design and music each night. There are six Events at the Barbican this week and no two will be the same.

London loves the 86-year-old American choreographer. This is his company’s fifth visit to the Barbican in six years.

click for more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2006 7:34 pm 
Lyndsey Winship wrote:
Merce Cunningham Dance Company
Event
Barbican, London
17/06/05

A performance by the Merce Cunningham company would be an event, even if it wasn't named as such. At 86, Cunningham is still seemingly as excited by experimentation as ever. Apparently he rubs his hands with glee when people walk out of the theatre during his shows, which a few do tonight at the Barbican. And you sympathise with them, because being part of a Cunningham event can be hard work.

It is not Cunningham's choreography which is challenging. His dancers are the embodiment of divine abstraction, showing off precision placing, endless balances and balletic grace in ever-inventive phrases. When it comes down to it, Cunningham is a sucker for a beautiful line, a joyful leap and a playful duet. Here he has chosen sections from his vast repertory and strung them together to make a different work each night, but everything springs from a clearly defined physical language - there is order at work.

The risks Cunningham takes are all to do with the collaborating artists that go to make up a complete performance. Every night at the Barbican different artists and musicians are creating the set, costumes and music independently and joining together to see how their worlds collide.

Tonight's featured artist is Roger Hiorns who offers a set of what look like giant melting light bulbs lined up along the back of the stage. They turn out to be columns of foam which expand and topple during the performance.

Much more imposing is the music, mostly improvised live by composers John King, Stephen Montague and John Paul Jones (of Led Zeppelin). Their individual contributions join together to make a multi-layered beast of electronic rumbling, scratching, burbling and clanging, shot through with the occasional pounding riff or slice of silence. Bar a welcome appearance from a John Cage prepared piano piece there's little melody or coherent structure to be found.

While there’s nothing wrong with atonality, soundscaping, and improvisation in themselves, in tandem with Cunningham’s choreography this sonic onslaught at times feels absurd. There are moments where the dancers are spookily in sync with a rhythm or mood coming from the pit, but mostly the music grumbles and roars uncomfortably while the dancers banter, laugh, jig, muse and meditate.

While it’s a consuming game to try to find links and similarities between the music and movement, another angle is to work on separating the elements in front of you, to zone in on just what the dancers are doing, which, let’s face it, is what Cunningham did when he created it. To feel the inner rhythms of the dance, to get caught in a small sequence of repetition, to hone in on the real quality of the tiniest movement - this is often the most satisfying part of the experience. Never mind the bigger picture.

Cunningham’s risk-taking and his desire to engage with contemporary artists is admirable. He still asks questions about art and makes his audience do the same, but it doesn’t always pay dividends. Thankfully, despite all the surrounding hoo-ha, in the end it’s the dancing that makes this an event worth witnessing.


Top
  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group