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 Post subject: Royal Ballet - Christopher Bruce (Hendrix) triple bill
PostPosted: Sat May 07, 2005 12:55 am 
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Does anyone know about the new Christopher Bruce Ballet to be performed by the ROH? They say that
" Due to a conflict of commitments, Carlos Acosta has had to withdraw from Christopher Bruce's new ballet. Because of this, Christopher Bruce has restructured his work".
I hope that as for the rest all remains the same, I do not want to miss Tamara Rojo on stage next May 17 :roll: Any new about this will be very welcomed :D


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PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2005 6:10 am 
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The first reviews are in below, CarolinaM. I spoke with a couple of dance professionals who saw the opening night and their feeling was that Bruce had set himself a very difficult task with Nigel Kennedy's Hendrix arrangements.

Here is the latest casting information for the programme:

http://info.royaloperahouse.org/ballet/ ... 76&cs=1432

No details of the Bruce work, but the reviews below talk about various dancers involved. His long-standing collaborator at Rambert, Deirdre Chapman features strongly.


Last edited by Stuart Sweeney on Sun May 15, 2005 7:14 am, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2005 6:11 am 
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It's Hendrix but not as we know him
By Jann Parry for The Observer


What would Christopher Bruce bring to the Royal Ballet in his first creation for the company? Since the 1960s, he has been associated with contemporary dance, though he's often worked with ballet companies. In Three Songs - Two Voices, he appears to be aiming for a timeless feel, rather than evoking the specific period of Jimi Hendrix's music.

Instead of rock'n'roll vocals, Bruce has chosen Nigel Kennedy's instrumental version of three Hendrix pieces.

click for more


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Royal Ballet mixed bill
By Judith Mackrell for The Guardian


Nigel Kennedy was clearly aiming to free his inner wild child when he recorded his own arrangement of Jimi Hendrix back in 1998. But it's less certain what Christopher Bruce is trying to do in making a ballet to it.
Three Songs-Two Voices is set to three tracks (Third Stone from the Sun, Little Wing and Fire) each of which becomes an anthem for the principal trio Zenaida Yanowsky, Tamara Rojo and Deirdre Chapman.

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PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2005 6:35 am 
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Burning down the House
Covent Garden’s only new ballet is inspired by Jimi Hendrix. By Debra Craine for The Times:


NO ONE planned it that way, but Christopher Bruce now has the distinction of creating the only world premiere at the Royal Ballet this season. Admittedly the 2004-05 season, which marks the centenary of Frederick Ashton’s birth, was always going to be a retrospective affair. But dance fans were nonetheless looking forward to two new pieces, including the return of Christopher Wheeldon, the New York-based British choreographer who scored a tremendous hit with his Tryst for Covent Garden in 2002.

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PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 12:15 pm 
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Thanks a lot Stuart!

I'm just back from London and I have seen all this information that is very welcomed as I have the show fresh in my memory. It has been my first time in Covent Garden and I have found a fantastic ambiance, what audience! really ballet lovers!

As far as the program is concerned, although I had preferred to see our beloved Tamara Rojo in a complete long ballet where all her skills and wonderful way of dancing could have been well admired, the variety of the 3 choreographies shown last Tuesday was very interesting.

We had an splendid night. The "pas à deux" in The Dream was delightfully danced by Leanne Benjamin as Titania and Edward Watson as Oberon and all the ballet, with the members of the Royal Ballet, was wonderful. The new work of Mr. Ch. Bruce: Three Songs - Two Voices gave us the opportunity to see Tamara and all the other great dancers such us Zenaida Yanowsky and, of course, Deirdre Champman partnered by Johannes Stepanek, Gary Avis and Ricardo Cervera, in a very different dancing language than the one we are used to see them in. We have loved the way Mr. Bruce has worked with the music, we have really liked this ballet, although I have had the impression that Tamara's duo danced a bit less than the other two but it also could be because I wanted so much to see her. And of course the Rite of Spring has been a magnific end, so impressive ballet that I had never seen before in live.

Well, I'm not a critic I'm only a ballet lover and also my English is not as good I wish to express all I feel. So please excuse-me for this short and leak feed-back and thanks once more for all your explanations and kind assistance to my post.


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PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 12:18 pm 
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CarolinaM, thanks a bunch for your comments - much appreciated. Keep 'em comin'.


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PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2005 5:20 am 
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Three Songs - Two Voices
By John Percival for The Stage


Christopher Bruce’s ballets, even the most abstract of them, always have a meaning and if I cannot identify the point of his latest creation that is because the music which means much to him passes me by. He calls it Three Songs - Two Voices. The sixties songs are by Jimi Hendrix and the second voice is that of Nigel Kennedy, who adapted them in 1998 for his violin with backing group. So I’ll quote Kennedy’s programme note that Hendrix embodied the discords of the disillusioned Vietnam decade, raw energy with a tender underside.

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PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2005 3:16 am 
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Royal Ballet Triple Bill
By Zoë Anderson for The Independent


The Royal Ballet's latest triple bill should have more impact. It starts with a new Ashton revival and ends with MacMillan's The Rite of Spring, with this season's only new work in the middle. Three Songs - Two Voices is danced to the violinist Nigel Kennedy's reinterpretation of songs by Jimi Hendrix.

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PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2005 6:53 am 
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In brief:
The Dream
By Jann Parry for The Observer


Supernatural beings abound in Ashton's The Dream, part of the Royal Ballet's latest triple bill. Johan Kobborg and Alina Cojocaru make Oberon and Titania into feral fairies, remote from human frailty.

click for more

***************************************

Purple haze
Nigel Kennedy playing Jimi Hendrix offers little in the way of balletic inspiration, says David Dougill for The Sunday Times.


With so much emphasis on commemorations and revivals — justifiable in the case of the Ashton centenary — the Royal Ballet had scheduled only two new creations for the current season, and one of those (by Christopher Wheeldon) unfortunately fell by the wayside.

This left Three Songs — Two Voices, by Christopher Bruce, to blaze the trail (so it was hoped) for novelty, premiered on the latest Covent Garden triple bill and returning for three more performances in June. Although Bruce is high on the list of distinguished British contemporary choreographers, it has taken the Royal a long time to catch up with him. Was it worth the wait? Three Songs — Two Voices is a busy ballet that doesn’t add up to the sum of its parts.

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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2005 10:36 am 
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Thanks a lot Stuart for posting all these reviews, did you know that John Percival's was my preferred ?
I've got it twice :P


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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 1:27 pm 
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Thanks Carolina, I've removed the second John Percival link - very helpful. When you get to my age...


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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2005 12:46 am 
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Oh, don't worry, dear, I probably already got to your age, as well....


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 1:55 pm 
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Tuesday, 7th June. The Dream; Three Songs, Two Voices; Symphony in C. In no order...

I don't know why, but as a first impression, I liked Three Songs, Two Vioces. Perhaps it's because I wasn't looking for anything in it, such as a particular theme or idea to take away. Put simply, it was easy to watch. There were a huge amount of moves in canon, which began to seem repetitive, but all of the others I went with (we were 6 in total) enjoyed the piece nonetheless. One said that it was 'intense'; I liked the surging of the corps dancers, in and out, and the energy of the movements, as well as the contemporary push/pull feeling, which made the pas de deux perhaps more interesting than the classical examples we saw that night. It contrasted sharply with Balanchine's Symphony in C, and out of the two, I probably actively enjoyed Bruce's piece for longer, continuous periods of time. The movements were so different to those from The Dream, which we saw before, and seemed more natural (though of course, I don't know anyone who moves like that naturally!). As one audience member put it " "Symphony in C" looked uncomfortable, but "Three Songs..." seemed fun!"

Oh, and special mention to Giacomo Ciriaci as Puck in The Dream, he was amazingly bouncy and hardly ever stopped moving! Costumes were pretty, floaty and suitably fairy-like too.


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