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 Post subject: "Homage to Diaghilev" programme in London - 20
PostPosted: Sat Jul 12, 2003 7:55 am 
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Performances of Homage to Diaghilev

- Fokine's "Chopiniana"
- Nijinska's "Les Noces"
- Fokine's "Schéhérazade"


28 July Mon 19:30

29 July Tue 19:30

30 July Wed 14:30 19:30


click for unofficial cast lists

<small>[ 18 September 2003, 06:27 PM: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: "Homage to Diaghilev" programme in London - 20
PostPosted: Thu Jul 17, 2003 9:51 pm 
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<img src="http://www.mariinsky.ru/img/ballet/spects/sheher.jpg" alt="" />

On the last Kirov visit, the performance of 'Schéhérazade' was one of the highlights for me:

Quote:
It is interesting to compare 'Le Corsaire' and 'Schéhérazade'. They are clearly in the same broad category - as the advertising for Fry's Turkish Delight chocolate bar told us in the past, '...full of Eastern promise.' However, for me, the latter is a far superior work.

After the superb Kirov performance last night with Irma Nioradze and Faroukh Ruzimatov, I was asking myself why this is. One reason is the harmony of the various elements, excellent in themselves - the Bakst designs, the Rimsky-Korsakov score and the homogenous dance style.
Click here for more about the Kirov's Fokine programme in 2001, which also included "Chopiniana" from this year's programme.

<small>[ 20 July 2003, 11:46 PM: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: "Homage to Diaghilev" programme in London - 20
PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2003 7:39 am 
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I have to say, when the Kirov came to New York a few years ago, their Diaghilev program was one of my favourites. It had a nice variety of styles.

This may sound like a silly question, but when I saw it last, I thought that there was mention of Andris Liepa having been the one who staged some of the reconstructed ballets? Or perhaps he was just instrumental in encouraging the Kirov to do so? Does anyone remember that? I know he was dancing with them at the time.


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 Post subject: Re: "Homage to Diaghilev" programme in London - 20
PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2003 9:12 pm 
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Andris is one of a handful of people who have unique rights to the Fokine ballets, and he's currently staging them in Rome with his own company, but I don't know that he was involved with staging anything of Diaghilev's. Maybe you were thinking of a mixed program that might have had a Fokine piece or two on it (??)

<small>[ 23 July 2003, 11:13 PM: Message edited by: Catherine Pawlick ]</small>

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 Post subject: Re: "Homage to Diaghilev" programme in London - 20
PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2003 9:41 pm 
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Well, it was a mixed bill of Diaghilev era pieces, actually, but all of them choreographed by Fokine, including Firebird, Scheherazade, and Chopiniana. I'm pretty sure he was at least responsible for Firebird, although Chopiniana seems like one of those ballets that never went out of the Kirov rep.

I'm curious though, do you know why he in particular had rights to stage the Fokine works?


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 Post subject: Re: "Homage to Diaghilev" programme in London - 20
PostPosted: Wed Jul 23, 2003 10:51 pm 
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It will be interesting to see how US fans will take to more Diaghilev after the Joffrey's successful tour recently in which a heavily promoted program was The Diaghilev Legacy:

<a href=http://forum.criticaldance.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=4;t=002032 target=_blank>Joffrey Ballet Summer Tour 2003</a>


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 Post subject: Re: "Homage to Diaghilev" programme in London - 20
PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2003 6:06 am 
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My guess Mary Ellen is that when Fokine went to work for Diaghilev he restaged his ballet as he would be entitled to do today as well. Not sure when they changed the title to "Les Sylphides".


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 Post subject: Re: "Homage to Diaghilev" programme in London - 20
PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2003 7:31 am 
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Well, Fokine was famous for making small changes to his ballets when he restaged them (Les Sylphides is a prime example. Diaghilev is actually the one who changed the name from Chopiniana, which was the name Fokine gave it when he originally choregraphed it for his students. He apprently wanted to be able to market it as similar to "La Sylphide")

But what I was wondering is why Andris Liepa in particular stages Fokine. He was too young to have known him and his family's history was with the Bolshoi, not the Mariinsky. He did a fabulous job with Firebird, but I remember thinking it odd because he was so young to have staged a reconstruction. Generally those sorts of things are done by people who danced with the choregraphers.


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 Post subject: Re: "Homage to Diaghilev" programme in London - 20
PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2003 7:51 am 
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Alas -- I do not know *how* or *why* he has those rights, only that he has them. I doubt it has anything to do with Bolshoi vs. Kirov per se... my guess would be that it was a passion of his that he pursued. I know he worked with the Michel Fokine Estate Archives and with Isabelle Fokine, (Fokine's granddaughter).

Edited to say: regardless of schooling, perhaps there was a family connection with the Fokines in some way. Purely speculation. It could, as I said, just be a passion of his. (??)

<small>[ 24 July 2003, 09:53 AM: Message edited by: Catherine Pawlick ]</small>

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 Post subject: Re: "Homage to Diaghilev" programme in London - 20
PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2003 8:00 am 
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Aha. I think we have our answer, see below. As I suspected, family interest and personal passion. Hard to imagine what it's like to grow up steeped in such tradition and history:

"Andris Liepa was born into the family of the legendary dancer and Bolshoy Theatre's soloist Maris Liepa (1936-1989). Thanks to his father who had been gathering materials on the Russian Seasons for many years, Andris Liepa was reared in an artistic atmosphere of the early 20th century. But his dazzling world's career absorbed him to such an extent that the plan for reviving Mikhail Fokine's ballet masterpieces with original decorations and costumes by painters Alexander Golovin, Alexander Benua and Leonid Bakst finally took shape only in 1992. The production "Return of The Firebird" that comprised three ballets with Fokine's choreography ("Petrouchka", "Scheherazade" and "The Firebird") premiered in the Mariinsky Theatre and then on the Bolshoy Theatre's stage in Moscow."

From: http://www.vor.ru/culture/cultarch240_eng.html

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 Post subject: Re: "Homage to Diaghilev" programme in London - 20
PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2003 8:07 am 
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I was under the impression that Isobel Fokine was responsible for the recent Fokine stagings at the Kirov. I remember seeing a documentary about her some years ago in which it was apparent that the Kirov dancers were less than thrilled with her contributions. But I seem to remember hearing that Liepa assisted her in some way (as interpreter?) The company had been dancing Chopiniana and Prince Igor for years before Ms Fokine arrived on the scene and I can also remember seeing some bizarre Soviet filmed versions of Petrushka and Spectre de la Rose many years ago, the latter danced by Andris's father Maris.

By the way, the beautiful front curtain used by the Kirov for Diaghilev programmes incorporates characters from some of Fokine's ballets and if you look carefully you will see that the Tsarevitch in the Firebird has Andris Liepa's face


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 Post subject: Re: "Homage to Diaghilev" programme in London - 20
PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2003 10:29 am 
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Hmm... my understanding was that it was Andris' impetus, in collaboration with Isabel (??). I'm now curious who initiated it. He is usually credited.

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 Post subject: Re: "Homage to Diaghilev" programme in London - 20
PostPosted: Sun Jul 27, 2003 3:55 am 
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Here are the relevant credits for the Fokine ballets currently in the Kirov rep. from the Kirov/Mariinsky website. Hope this is useful:

***********************

"Chopiniana"

Revised version: Agrippina Vaganova (1931)

***********************

"The Firebird"

Reconstruction: Isabelle Fokine, Andris Liepa

***********************

"Schéhérazade"

Reconstruction by Isabelle Fokine, Andris Liepa

***********************

"Le Spectre de la Rose"

Reconstruction: Isabelle Fokina

***********************

"Petrouchka"

Production: Leonid Leontiev for the Mariinsky Theatre in 1920
based on the choreographic composition: Mikhail Fokine
Restaged: Sergey Vikharev

************************

"The Dying Swan"

Choreography: Mikhail Fokin
(no additional notes)

************************

"Polovtsian Dances"

Choreography: Mikhail Fokin
(no additional notes)

<small>[ 27 July 2003, 05:57 AM: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: "Homage to Diaghilev" programme in London - 20
PostPosted: Sun Jul 27, 2003 3:57 am 
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<img src="http://www.criticaldance.com/kirov2003/gallery/1.jpg" alt="" />
<small>Chopiniana</small>

Audiences in London love full-length ballets and triple bills are always more difficult to sell. The classic example is ENB's annual Christmas visit to London, where there are around 25 performances of the Nutcracker and another full-length ballet and two or three of a triple bill. AND tickets for the triple are usually listed from the start at half price.

I am delighted that the Kirov is presenting two triple bills this time and the first comes up this week. Sadly the general rule applies and it is selling the slowest of the five programmes.

Homage to Diaghilev

- Fokine's "Chopiniana"
- Nijinska's "Les Noces"
- Fokine's "Schéhérazade"

28 July Mon 19:30

29 July Tue 19:30

30 July Wed 14:30 and 19:30

This is one of the strongest mixed bills to be seen in London this year. Fokine's beautiful "Chopiniana" was first produced in 1907, but rejects classicism to return to the spirit of the Romantic ballets of the first half of the 19th C. "Les Noces" gives us a chance to see a slightly different version of this extraordinarily powerful and innovative work from the one we are used to from the Royal Ballet. Plus we see how Russian dancers respond to the indigenous musical and cultural framework that Stravinsky and Bronislava Nijinska created. Finally there is Fokine's "Schéhérazade". While this is not everyone's favourite, it is certainly one of mine and I am very happy to give myself up to its great music, faux orientalism, unbridled lust, wonderful dancing and the final tragedy that all contribute to the attractions of this ballet.

If "Le Sacre Du Printemps" is the single work I am looking forward to the most in this season, "Homage to Diaghilev" is the top programme for me. I strongly urge seasoned ballet goers and relative newcomers to go. The quality of the three ballets and their extraordinary diversity will make it almost impossible to get bored.

The last I heard, there were plenty of tickets left for these four performances.

<small>[ 27 July 2003, 06:03 AM: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: "Homage to Diaghilev" programme in London - 20
PostPosted: Sun Jul 27, 2003 7:36 am 
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Thanks, Stuart! I did also find a bit of info (possibly what you were referring to Catherine?) On Nina Ananiashvili's site:
Quote:
By 1995, when at the Kirov once more visited the Metropolitan Opera, Liepa had begun staging ballets---and even operas for the company. That season, the company presented his acclaimed recreation of the famous Michel Fokine works, Firebird and Scheherazade, along with its earlier production of Les Sylphides (Chopiniana). Injury had sidelined the dancer from the most technically demanding roles in the repertory, but he danced Ivan Tsarevich in Firebird.

Fortunately, Liepa was able to garner enough interest and support for his Fokine project, and with the help of Russia's Parex Bank and other institutions, he was able to film his conception of Petrouchka, Firebird and Scheherazade. It took some time to complete, but the results are gratifying. This extravagantly realized filmic representation of three of Fokine's most famous choreographic works has raised hackles among dance scholars--there's been some quibbling about details, such as how the Golden Slave dies in Scheherazade. But this project had the cooperation of the Michel Fokine Estate Archives and the guidance of Isabelle Fokine, the choreographer's granddaughter and an authority on his works.
Man, wish I had seen that film!


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