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 Post subject: Trying to remember a term . . .
PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 2005 1:49 pm 
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I was in class the other day and my teacher gave us an exercise, and I was wondering if anyone knew the proper French name for it. It was basically a developpe (sp?) except instead of lowering the working leg to the floor after it was extended, we brought the leg back in to passe (retire) and lowered it to the ground from there. I hope that made sense.

My teacher just called them reverse developpes. Is there a proper term for them?

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 Post subject: Re: Trying to remember a term . . .
PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 2005 3:32 pm 
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It sounds a little like what one of my old teachers called enveloppé. But I think it's also called "retiré" (that term meaning an action, rather than a place.)


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 Post subject: Re: Trying to remember a term . . .
PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 2005 5:37 pm 
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I was thinking the same thing. I've always called this enveloppe, too...but when I thought I would double check the term in Gail Grant's manual, enveloppe sounded like something very different. I often use this in rond de jambe a terre combinations during barre. Now, I'm curious!


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 Post subject: Re: Trying to remember a term . . .
PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 2005 6:52 pm 
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Location: Santa Barbara, CA USA
My teachers call that an enveloppe, too. They use retire to mean bringing the leg into high passe, whether it comes from the ground, or from an extended leg.

edit: I wanted to add that the barre combination I remember for this is something like pas de cheval from fifth, 1 or 2 piques (tap the toes on the floor), enveloppe back into fifth, done en croix or front-back-side, usually done to very fast music. Uggh.

--Andre

<small>[ 08 April 2005, 08:58 PM: Message edited by: Andre Yew ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Trying to remember a term . . .
PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:33 pm 
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Location: Australia
hi there. agree with all the above. it does sound like an eveloppe or reverse developpe. which method of dance do you learn?


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 Post subject: Re: Trying to remember a term . . .
PostPosted: Tue Apr 12, 2005 1:33 pm 
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I study ballet. I've never heard of retire being used in that sense, but enveloppe sounds about right.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2005 3:58 pm 
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Location: france
I have just read this topic. The right term in French is "raccourci". Some teachers call it enveloppé, but this word is normally used for astep that begins often in second position and then you enveloppe your leg to go on a turn on two legs. It's the opposite of a détourne, wich is an "en dehors" turn on two feet. Oh I'm sorry, my english is awful, I think I should maybe explain it in french or in spanish!


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2005 6:09 pm 
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Enveloppé is a term I can concur with here, although with my students, I'd probably use "retiré" in this case, as I like to think of enveloppé as being initiated first by a brush, the leg being extended first (but not by unfolding).

One of my favorite combinations is to give alternate pas de chevals and enveloppés. Something like: pas de cheval, enveloppé twice en croix. or to do four of each and then reverse. At first in two counts and then in one count. It makes for great quick and supple footwork. :wink:

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2005 5:58 am 
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Location: france
It's very interesting to see how a term can be used in different ways. It depends of the schools and the countries. I can help you with French school, and you all can teach me about the others . I think many terms are different, for example whats is for you a dégagé? What is the difference with a tendue? A tour jeté is for french teachers a grand jeté en tournant, wich is a bit different of an entrelacé.


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