public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Mon Apr 21, 2014 7:09 am

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 85 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: On Becoming an Intern
PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2001 1:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Dec 15, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 498
Location: neworleans, louisiana
DId any of you dance majors have a prerequisite to complete at least 4 semesters of tech? I had to do that in the theater and dance depts., at something like 60 hours for 1 credit. (Upperclassmen could often 'fudge it' and get someone to sign in mega hours for them.) But I worked like a dog to get those hours in. <P>Since my performing was done in a company outside the university, I enjoyed having this experience within the school's performances. <P>I think the smart dancers were the ones who got into the tech side of production, to broaden their employability. Also, it doesn't hurt as a performer to be familiar with what's going on beyond the choreography. <P>These days, even with high school students, I would say when it comes time for play auditions (unless you're doing the lead each time -- and maybe, not even then) sign up as student director or for tech. Not nearly as many people will be signing up for that stuff, and you could have a lot more fun and learn a heck of a lot more than you would sitting around waiting to say your two lines each night. You're not going to learn jack-___ about acting in much of this stuff, but you will about the other aspects of production.<P>Just a thought. (I wish I'd known me when I was younger).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: On Becoming an Intern
PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2001 4:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
I did know me when I was younger, and it didn't do a heck of a lot of good did it?


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: On Becoming an Intern
PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2001 8:30 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Dec 15, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 498
Location: neworleans, louisiana
This question from you? I don't believe it for a minute. You sound like you were an old soul from the get go.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: On Becoming an Intern
PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2001 10:21 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jul 15, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 971
Location: Pennsylvania
Soooooo, what can we do differently? What can we do to help change this trend?<BR>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: On Becoming an Intern
PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2001 3:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 28
Location: College Park, MD; USA
Hello, all; Jeff Salzberg and I worked together in a horrific theater environment in Florida last year. I still owe him a steak dinner apology for luring him down there, lol! <P>Anyways, I can see where he's coming from on his 'intern orientation,' and his frustrations are borne out nationwide. It's very frustrating to meet your production interns, i.e., carpentry and props, and discover that the people who have been hired to support your department (and hopefully advance their skills, not just gain basic ones) have never touched a power tool in their life, be it portable or stationary. <P>I do think part of the problem is what Christina mentioned in her story: the attitude that if a temporary assignment isn't the end-all be-all job, why should you care if you perform it well? <P>I've dealt with a lot of interns over the years when I was working as a TD or SM in regional non-profit theaters. And I ran into that attitude a lot. Many of them seemed to think that they were in their fifth/sixth year of college and looked at the internship as another year of being protected and coddled. <P>So, the problem in my opinion is that theaters and other arts organizations are not being strident enough in their demand that an intern applicant actually be mature enough and qualified enough to be hired. They are basically willing to take someone off the sidewalk in some instances, out of pure desperation. Kids these days don't want to work low-paying summerstock jobs when they know they can make more money working retail or doing computer work. They prefer to confine their theater studies to the school year. This lessens the pool of qualified applicants. <P>An internship is hard work with low pay. As an intern, you're expected to work your heart out, keep your mouth shut and hopefully, you will gain some meaningful experience as well as future job contacts and good references. We don't all come out of the womb with Broadway producers on the phone waiting to hire us, after all...<P><BR>Meredith


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: On Becoming an Intern
PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2001 4:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
Welcome to our board Meredith - great to have you join us.<P>It seems to be pervasive in our society to eschew the entry level position. I think that the attitude that everyone wants to start out in management is across the board. You can see it in the simplest advertisement for the simplest job. A job for a sales clerk - is now called an "associate" - what's wrong with being a sales clerk? <P>I have even seen advertisements for sales clerks called "beginning management sales associate" - for a teenager doing part time work at Christmas time in a Woolworth type of store. It's as if these entry level jobs simply were a waste of time - why bother if it doesn't have a title? Nevermind - that good experience can be gained, along with a paycheck.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: On Becoming an Intern
PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2001 4:54 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Dec 12, 1999 12:01 am
Posts: 3663
Location: The Bronx is up; the Battery's down
That's a very good point, Basheva.<P>I think that part of the problem is with theatre educators -- they teach the kids that being a stagehand somehow makes one inferior (the head of the Design/Technology department at Suny/Purchase once told me proudly that they don't teach students to be stagehands, only designers), so students who might have been perfectly happy as electricians or carpenters are pushed into fields for which they have no aptitude.<P>------------------<BR>Jeffrey E. Salzberg, Lighting Designer<P>Online portfolio: <A HREF="http://www.suncoast.quik.com/salzberg" TARGET=_blank>http://www.suncoast.quik.com/salzberg</A> <BR>This Day in Arts History: <A HREF="http://www.suncoast.quik.com/salzberg/arthist.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.suncoast.quik.com/salzberg/arthist.htm</A><P><BR>

_________________
Jeffrey E. Salzberg,
Dance Lighting Design
http://www.jeffsalzberg.com


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: On Becoming an Intern
PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2001 2:05 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 28
Location: College Park, MD; USA
Jeff, and if they do eventually pass out of their 'designer' student phase and become actual 'stagehands,' it's only with the greatest of disdain for technical 'work,' in some cases... Image <P>Here we are, back to the ol' saw: "I'm not going to do this for the rest of my life, so why should I care?" <P>Meredith


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: On Becoming an Intern
PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2001 2:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 28
Location: College Park, MD; USA
Jeff and everyone,<BR>I just thought of another bit of advice for the 'intern' guidebook. <P>Explain to your interns nicely but very firmly that the theater facilities and the items within, ie, tools, costumes, props, etc., are to be treated with respect. <P>How many times have you found a tool or device that you bought for your department lying around outside in the rain or else covered in sawdust (or worse) on the shop floor? Another example: how many times have you discovered the stage door unlocked on the theater's dark days? (I say this last one for organizations that, for whatever reason, give keys to the building to their apprentices.)<P>I think it's important to impart to them the level of responsibility that comes with the job outside of the actual physical and mental labor of 'production.' This also applies to how they treat their housing, but that is something that would be best addressed by the Company Manager, I think.<P>Just a thought,<BR>Meredith


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: On Becoming an Intern
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2001 3:27 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Dec 12, 1999 12:01 am
Posts: 3663
Location: The Bronx is up; the Battery's down
That's a good point, Meredith.<P>To quote k. d. lang, "What's taught is what's learned"; shortly after starting a teaching position at a small college in the midwest, I found a Mole Richardson 10" Fresnel (this is a very good, <I>very</I> expensive light) completely buried under a pile of sawdust in the scene shop.<P><BR>------------------<BR>Jeffrey E. Salzberg, Lighting Designer<P>Online portfolio: <A HREF="http://www.suncoast.quik.com/salzberg" TARGET=_blank>http://www.suncoast.quik.com/salzberg</A> <BR>This Day in Arts History: <A HREF="http://www.suncoast.quik.com/salzberg/arthist.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.suncoast.quik.com/salzberg/arthist.htm</A><BR><p>[This message has been edited by salzberg (edited March 21, 2001).]

_________________
Jeffrey E. Salzberg,
Dance Lighting Design
http://www.jeffsalzberg.com


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: On Becoming an Intern
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2001 5:50 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
Taking Meredith's point a step further, one must be taught not only to respect the tools of one's own trade (though the tools may be owned by another), but also to respect the tools of other crafts.<P>Like don't step on a pair of pointe shoes that seem to be just lying around - they might be there for a reason - like a very quick change in the wings.<P>I had that happen to me - I had the permission of the backstage powers that be to leave my pointe shoes there for a quick costume change - and came back to find that one of the stage hands had stepped all over them. They were not only smooshed - but dirty, and I had no choice but to put them on and rush out back onto the stage.<P>A one time incident, I know, but respect for EVERYONE'S tools of the trade, are necessary.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: On Becoming an Intern
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2001 6:59 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Dec 12, 1999 12:01 am
Posts: 3663
Location: The Bronx is up; the Battery's down
Absolutely, Basheva.<P>It's possible, of course, that the stagehand didn't realize the shoes were there but, even so, s/he should have been more aware.<P>Respect for one's colleagues is a vital part of professionalism. Meredith and I worked together at one company which proclaimed itself to be based upon respect for artists, but this respect was often not seen in practice. It made the company an unusually stressful place in which to work.

_________________
Jeffrey E. Salzberg,
Dance Lighting Design
http://www.jeffsalzberg.com


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: On Becoming an Intern
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2001 7:51 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Dec 12, 1999 12:01 am
Posts: 3663
Location: The Bronx is up; the Battery's down
On respect for equipment:<P>There's a type of lighting instrument called an "ellipsoidal reflector spotlight" (colloquially known as a "leko", which is like referring to all photocopiers as "Xerox" or all facial tissue as "Kleenix"). These fixtures have internal shutters which are used to shape the beam of light -- to frame it off of a curtain, or to keep it from spilling all over the backdrop, for example. If these shutters get misshapen, it becomes impossible to get a straight edge on the light -- the shutter -- and often the fixture -- is virtually useless.<P>Standard professional practice is to push the shutters all the way in before "striking" the light (to keep them from getting bent) and to pull them out when hanging the light (because if the fixture is turned on while the shutters are all the way in, they can warp or burn from the heat). Here's the result of someone's not bothering to do it right:<P> Image <p>[This message has been edited by salzberg (edited March 21, 2001).]

_________________
Jeffrey E. Salzberg,
Dance Lighting Design
http://www.jeffsalzberg.com


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: On Becoming an Intern
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2001 8:16 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jul 15, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 971
Location: Pennsylvania
I thought it was an iris template


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: On Becoming an Intern
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2001 2:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 28
Location: College Park, MD; USA
Basheva's story about the pointe shoes is, unfortunately, a fairly typical occurrence in some organizations. But I wholeheartedly agree that respect for the materials owned and used by the organization do extend beyond one's own department. Sorry for not being clearer about that in my first post! <P>The sad part is that people need to be reminded of this simple, common sense necessity so frequently and so firmly. <P>Meredith


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 85 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group