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 Post subject: Student-Centred Learning
PostPosted: Sat Oct 07, 2000 3:57 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 2208
Location: Australia
the following quote is extracted from a book review, re julia buckroyd's 'The Thinking Body'. i tried to get a review copy of this book, but my editor already has someone in london doing it...shame! so i'll have to wait to see the book myself. looks like there is plenty there to discuss!<P>this quote was in relation to the (possible) resulting immaturity of dance students, sequestered away in focused ('specialised', trina!) training institutions::<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>"Although there have been massive changes in ways of teaching in mainstream education, it's light years away in the dance world," Ms Buckroyd said. <P>"Teaching's often still very hierarchical and the lack of student-centred learning is quite significant. <P>Training isn't structured in a way that helps them to interact, and it just doesn't help them to mature." <HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P>kathryn wade at english national balletschool contradicted this comment by saying the days when the teacher was the only one talking are long gone, and that there is now plenty of conversation in a class.....<P>my comment: some places, only!<P>however, i see this issue of 'student-centred learning' as being about rather more than just conversation...<P>'student-centred learning' was one of the themes in my university education studies - a general course for teachers of anything - and i really wondered about its applicability in ballet class, precisely because we are 'training' in a dance class, first and foremost..yes, we are 'educating' too (see the distinctions we have made, for discussion purposes, in the Dance Education/Training thread), but the priority is PHYSICAL training which requires a different focus....any thoughts?

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 Post subject: Re: Student-Centred Learning
PostPosted: Sun Oct 08, 2000 8:40 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 11327
Location: San Diego, California, USA
It seems to me that one thing we haven't mentioned a great deal is "style" of teaching. Style is as individual as each teacher, but I think it can be divided into groups. <P>The autocrat - she/he is icy, remote, royal(and that's how many lay people think of ballet and ballet teachers.)<P>The despot - unfortunately I have met too many of them. "This is my studio and you come in here at my suffrance" - is what they seem to be saying. "Wither when I glare at you, my idea of teaching is to denigrate you and hopefully make you cry. It makes me feel so powerful". The student is not there to enhance the teacher's delusions of power.<P>The Keeper of the Keys to the Kingdom - This teacher operates from the premise that "the ballet is a sacred thing, locked up carefully and known only to special savants, and I am one of them. When you are ready (and if you are lucky I will tell you when that is) I shall allow you to eat crumbs from the table of my knowledge." These teachers seem to think that knowledge is to be hoarded. Maybe that's because they have a limited supply of it. Knowledge like power, increases when it is given away.<P>The Facilitator - this is the teacher who teaches, imparts, elicits effort, causes knowledge to be spread in a positive manner. It is not instructional to say to the student "you are not doing it correctly", the facilitator says "this is how to improve what you are doing". <BR>


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 Post subject: Re: Student-Centred Learning
PostPosted: Sun Oct 08, 2000 4:35 pm 
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Location: Australia
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>These teachers seem to think that knowledge is to be hoarded. Maybe that's because they have a limited supply of it. Knowledge like power, increases when it is given away. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P>marvellous! Image to me, this also relates to our use of the internet in dance....<p>[This message has been edited by grace (edited October 08, 2000).]

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 Post subject: Re: Student-Centred Learning
PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2000 3:15 am 
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basheva, i love your categorisations! not meaning to be rude at all, because i know you have a fertile magination AND a way with words, but: is this your own summation, or did you come across something like it in print somewhere? <P>reason i ask is, that in australia someone did an article on precisely these lines about 3 or 4 years ago...tony geeves, an australian researcher....wonder if you saw it?<P>in a separate artcicle about 'bullying' the type of teacher most prone to that was also described...

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 Post subject: Re: Student-Centred Learning
PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2000 3:20 am 
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oops, didn't mean to encourage anyone off-course (!), so re-posting this bit:<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>The Facilitator - this is the teacher who teaches, imparts, elicits effort, causes knowledge to be spread in a positive manner. It is not instructional to say to the student "you are not doing it correctly", the facilitator says "this is how to improve what you are doing". <HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P>obviously this is good teaching: to inform/impart information, and to encourage (and reward) effort, but 'facilitation' is commonly defined in a much broader way - to <B>facilitate</B> (literally to make 'facile', i.e. to make easy) development, or fruition, or realisation, of aims...<P>in this sense, facilitation refers to <B>enabling</B> the student's desires, not working towards your own ...<p>[This message has been edited by grace (edited October 14, 2000).]

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 Post subject: Re: Student-Centred Learning
PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2000 7:06 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
No, Grace - I never saw the article to which you are referring. I made those categories up as I fell asleep one night - I do my best thinking asleep, I guess. LOL<P>It has always seemed to me that the primary role of the teacher is as "facilitator" - what else? To yell - "you are wrong" is an opinion, and negative at that - totally unhelpful. <P>The teacher must enable - almost live through, in a positive way, the accomplishments of the student. I remember the first time a student did something better than I did - for a moment my natural competitiveness as a dancer came to the fore - but then I realized her accomplishment was really mine, too.<P>My first teacher - a very old lady - said to me one day "As long as my students dance, I am dancing" - I have never forgotten that.<P>And, Miss Ellicott - as you watch me from your place in heaven - Basheva is still dancing................


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