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 Post subject: recognizing your teacher
PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2001 8:09 am 
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Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 31
In the school I attend, there doesn't seem to be a standard action for completing a class and recognizing the teacher for her advice and her help, except to applaud. It looks like the kids are required to walk up to the teacher, wait in line and do a port de bras, but there is nothing set for adults... What is and isn't appropriate? and those of you who are teachers, what do you like to see? What don't you like to see?


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 Post subject: Re: recognizing your teacher
PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2001 9:13 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
Well, it is certainly right to applaud and say thank you with a reverence.<P>As an adult with my first teacher, we also lined up to curtsey - and I loved that. Gave me a chance to practice my curtsey - and she would take the oppotunity to correct us.<P>In some classes there is not even applauding, but I really don't like that at all - there should be that traditional "thank you".


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 Post subject: Re: recognizing your teacher
PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2001 9:30 am 
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Joined: Fri Dec 22, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 68
Location: IL, USA
Personally, I HATE being curtsied to! I do lead a reverance at the end of class, but then I direct the applause to our accompanist. I prefer a simple, sincere thank-you to any orchestrated or rote gesture.<P>------------------<BR>It is not knowing the answer that matters, but what question to ask...

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It is not knowing the answer that matters, but what question to ask...<BR>


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 Post subject: Re: recognizing your teacher
PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2001 1:11 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2000 11:01 pm
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Location: Guildford, Surrey, UK
I agree with cabriole that someone spontaneiously coming up and thanking you or telling you they enjoyed the class, is much nicer than anything regimented or expected.<P>However I suppose curtseys or bows are just basic dance manners.


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 Post subject: Re: recognizing your teacher
PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2001 2:06 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
I agree, Joanne, I consider applauding the teacher just basic good ballet class manners. <P>In re-directing it to the pianist as Cabriole's mentions is also good manners - or else the class should definitely include the pianist.<P>My first teacher was a student of Alexandra Baldina, (with the original Diagelev dancers) and it was not only customary to give her an individual reverence after class - it was also done before class. I always considered it a pleasure to curtsey to her. <P>And her corrections of my curtsey certainly did help me ...she used that opportunity to correct and also to instill a sense of the different styles of curtsies; romantic, classical, etc.<P>When my students (though I never demanded it) would come up and curtsey to me - I would respond in kind. And it was mutually enjoyable.<P>(I just looked up the spelling for curtsey/curtsy- and both are correct)<p>[This message has been edited by Basheva (edited January 29, 2001).]


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 Post subject: Re: recognizing your teacher
PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2001 4:21 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 82
Location: Virginia
If there is a solo dancer, that person often brings the teacher(s) flowers after the finale if there is one, and the rest of us applaud and coupe with a modern bow. But one of my teachers has stagefright and won't go on the stage. So we opt to put a picture of her in the program sometimes. <BR>-zoe Image


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 Post subject: Re: recognizing your teacher
PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2001 7:28 pm 
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
Zoe - I think also that we are discussing how the teacher is thanked after each class - not just after a performance or a recital.<P>Can you tell us how you do this in your classes? and what kind of classes they are too. I would be interested to hear that.


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 Post subject: Re: recognizing your teacher
PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2001 7:39 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 11, 2000 11:01 pm
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Location: Montreal, QC, Canada
I usually wear my contact lenses to help me recognize my teachers. ;P Sorry, couldn't resist. Sometimes after a class I will thank a teacher for a particular correction (if they're not running out the door or busy getting ready for their next class). This helps me to reinforce what they were trying to explain during the class and conversely the teacher gets to know that you appreciate their efforts.


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 Post subject: Re: recognizing your teacher
PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2001 9:30 am 
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Joined: Fri Dec 15, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 498
Location: neworleans, louisiana
Personally,I like it when they stoop to kiss my ring and address me, "Your Majesty." <P>This is again why I love teaching young 'uns. You can manipulate them so much, but they deserve it for sharing bronchitis and other maladies (as referred to in another thread). <P>No, actually, the reason I like getting them early on is that this is just another one of the many ways, even though it's not technically "ballet," that I can groom them with good dance etiquette.<P>My pre-ballet students make two lines by themselves, spread themselves out by using the length of both arms and stand in a comfortable first position (at 10 to 2 o'clock) and their arms and hands held in en bas. That's all done on their own as prep while I watch and nod in grave approval.<P>We then sing, "En bas, en haut, that's the way our arms go, port de bras, that's how we say, moving our arms in ballet." <P>From there, they do a wee one's curtsy. They break it into parts. First opening their ams to second, then extending one leg into tendu with a pointed foot, then bending the opposite knee, then straightening the knee, bringing the leg in and the arms down. All in complete silence. Then they clap for their teacher and for their good class and their good behavior and trot to the far wall of the studio in a well-formed line for a sticker and a word of praise about some particularly good thing I liked that day. <P>In the adult class (you know -- the one I got kicked out of) I always turned towards the teacher and stood and clapped, but many of the students did not clap, or else just did it as they walked toward the bench or dressing room -- in other words, it didn't have a collective feel to it. I always was kind of the ring leader about such things -- like urging my classmates to get closer together -- a la ensemble -- for reverence, while the teacher got the music ready. I think they thought that was a joke, but as much as I like a good time, I still believe in treating all aspects of ballet class with reverence (no pun intended). After all, why show up? <P>


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 Post subject: Re: recognizing your teacher
PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2001 10:54 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
When I am in ballet class I feel a great connectedness to the history that has gone before me, all the dancers that have stood in classrooms, and on stages. The protoculs of the ballet class are a part of that tradition and history - the skein that links one generation to another.<P>I really do think of the ballerinas of the Maryinsky in the 1800's doing their plies, as I do mine. I think about the great primas and danseur nobles, doing tendu - and yes, at the end of the class making their reverence.<P>If they could do it - and because they did it - I love to do it and join as a link in that chain.


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 Post subject: Re: recognizing your teacher
PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2001 12:26 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 15, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 498
Location: neworleans, louisiana
Basheva -- I love all your thoughts about taking class and being part of history. I also like to think as I begin plies to think of this as the last class I may ever take. I guess I began thinking that way when I got cancer and rather than it being a morbid thought, it made me feel full of life and joy, to really focus with gratitude on being in class one more day, because that's all any of us ever have to count on -- today. <P>Some people might think we are being overly dramatic, but I say, hey, that's why we do this instead of jog (ugh).


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 Post subject: Re: recognizing your teacher
PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2001 2:48 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
Well, Christina - perhaps some of that comes from my having begun dance so late. I would watch the other children go off to classes of all kinds (piano, dance, etc.) and it simply was impossible for my family. My parents were very hard working people, and it was a good day when there was adequate food in the house. So dance lessons were quite, quite out of the question.<P>But there is an upside to that - with years comes appreciation - now I just need to work on maturity - or maybe not ha ha !!


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 Post subject: Re: recognizing your teacher
PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2001 4:40 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
You know Christina - I suspect that if you and I ever met and had lunch, we could talk - and never stop........<P>Let me know if you are ever in the San Diego area......


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 Post subject: Re: recognizing your teacher
PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2001 4:59 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 02, 1999 12:01 am
Posts: 2708
Location: Seattle, WA USA
I like doing a traditional, group reverence (with accompaniment)at the end of all my adult classes. I try to do it with my kids classes,too. It gives a sense of closure, and ends the class on a calm, respectful and "traditional" note. I DON'T like individual bows, where the kids line up to thank you. I subbed at a big conservatory in Seattle, and everyone came up at the end of modern class and did a ballet bow!! It was weird, and makes me uncomfortable. Even at the end of ballet class. Maybe becasue I never did it as a student....so, it's not really a part of my background. I DO like some kind of acknowledgment, not just everyone running off to the dressing room. And to also acknowledge the accompanist--very important!


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 Post subject: Re: recognizing your teacher
PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2001 5:29 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
I like your use of the word "closure" Trina - it's a very important concept isn't it?<P>It holds true not only for class - but for each combination at the barre and in the center - and becomes almost second nature. A clean, defined finish. <P>At at the end translates itself to the stage.


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