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 Post subject: Re: ill and at class?
PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2001 12:05 am 
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Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 3129
Location: Guildford, Surrey, UK
Basheva - what a delighful experience you had in class! Aren't four year olds so good at sharing!<P>If you have had quite a serious illness it does take a long time to recover. When I was 16 I had a bout of very severe food poisoning at the beginning of the Summer Holidays - I was physically ill for about two weeks - the doctor gave me no drugs as he put it down to a virus. I was very ill and i think had I have been younger or an elderly person i would have been hospitalised.<P>I was well enough to go back to school in the September but by the December I had come down with Glandular Fever. I was off school for two weeks leading up to the holidays. After Christmas I had my mock GCSE's and i remember just going into school sitting an exam and then just coming home and sleeping the rest of the day.<P>I would say it took me over a year to properly recover and feel myself again so Zoe don't rush things and when you do go back take things slowly.


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 Post subject: Re: ill and at class?
PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2001 10:32 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 122
Location: Dortmund, NRW, Germany
I'm not sure if this is the right topic to come with the next problem. When not, please feel free - dear moderators - to start a new one.<P>As I said, it's not easy.<P>A mother came to me after a school performance - 3 years ago - with the question if her daughter could register in one of the dance classes.<P>At that moment she was 7 years old and she had the Illnes of Down. (i'm not sure if this is the right word!?)<P>At that moment i couldn't see any problem. The class she liked to join was very strong (about 14 kids of 7 years)<P>The first year: no problem at all. The teacher seemed to make a good job. The girl (her name is Alina) felt well. And the other girls accepted her the way she is.<P>Then after all the other girls become 8 - 9 years old, suddenly everything changed. Alina is still very happy in class. But the others aren't.<P>Alina is not aware of her own strength. When she likes someone, she is embracing the child in a way they don't like at all. They are afraid of her.<P>More difficult is the fact, that the children are noticing that Alina is "different" and that she is not able to do the things the teacher is asking for.<P>Of course it isn't just possible to ignore her.<P>The parents are terminating the contracts. The don't say it's because of Alina, o no, there are a lot of other reasons. The group of 15 children is not existing anymore. All children left. <P>For Alina that's no problem she changed in another group: also very strong. And again: the same problem. About 5 children left.<P>Perhaps you can imagine the reaction as we talked to the mother of Alina. She doesn't agree with the arguments and talked to the other parents. These parents declared there solidarity with Alina.<P>Is there anyone who has made a simular experience?


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 Post subject: Re: ill and at class?
PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2001 10:49 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
Berry - I believe in another thread we touched on some of the problems that individual students can pose to the class as a whole.<P>Many times accommodations can be made for these students, but sometimes the welfare of the group has to also be considered, too. As I remember it, we all pretty much agreed that there were a couple of alternatives. One of the them you have already tried - and that was talking to the parent. But, also a private lesson might be offerred.<P>It is a difficult position for everyone. <P>When I was taking a class at the college (I was not the teacher - I was a student) one of the other students had asthma and she had to constantly have the air "moving" in the class. Therefore a very large - very tall - free standing fan was brought in and placed directly in front of the entire class. <P>Now, the winters in San Diego don't get very cold - but the buildings aren't heated either and it can get quite chilly, especially in the mornings. So there we were all trying to dance, sweating, working hard with this monster wind blowing on us. People started getting quite ill, muscles cramping, etc., and we were told that because of the "Americans with Disabilities Act" the floor fan would have to stay. <P>I thought it was sad missuse of that law.<P>


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 Post subject: Re: ill and at class?
PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2001 12:29 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 15, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 498
Location: neworleans, louisiana
My ENT says fans are a no-no for those with allergies/asthma. And he's chief of his dept. and a very bright boy. It must have been nice to have a fan blowing down your sweaty back and particles stirred up in the air. Sounds goofy to me.


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 Post subject: Re: ill and at class?
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2001 2:08 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 290
Location: Ontario, Canada
Berry,<P>You certainly have described a difficult situation. I assume that you mean Alina has Down's Syndrome, a chromosomal abnormality which usually results in certain physical characteristics and some intellectual delays. The degree of intellectual delay can vary quite significantly. Some children are able to attend regular school programs with a little assistance, others require specialized intensive help.<P>Often children with cognitive impairments don't appear too different from their "normal" peers for a number of years, or at least they can manage in typical situations. When they reach a certain age (I think about the age you mentioned, 9 or 10) their peers become fairly sophisticated in their ability to think abstractly... and the delayed children stay the same. Children who have been tolerant in the passt aren't anymore, and in dance there may be physical limitations as well.<P>There is no one good or right answer here for the teacher in this dilemma. I have seen what happened with a girl in choir at my daughter's school; she enjoyed being "included", but the others didn't really enjoy it by the time they were 12 and 13. <P>Perhaps there would be some way to maintain a "beginning" dance class for a student this age, or you would want to keep her back with younger students who would be closer to her cognitive level. There will always be those who feel they are "entitled" to certain things, however, and you will have to be the judge of how to negotiate that.<P>Please keep us poseted.


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 Post subject: Re: ill and at class?
PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2001 7:36 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 130
Location: Pa, USA
In regard to Berry's dilemma I think there is a large difference between an NDA (not diagnosed with anything) child coming to class with a virus, and a child with a diagnosed challenge or disability. <P>When you have a situation where a child has a genuine physical challenge, often teachers will integrate the challenged individual as part of the regular dance class. This has many beneficial points, not the least of which is learning acceptance by their peers in the studio. Not everyone moves or processes information the same and realizing this at a young age can improve the attitude of an entire class. <P>When an individual is hindering an entire class by their ability level, it is time to re-assess the situation. It may be more valuable for the challenged individual to stay at a beginner level where they can process the information given and physically attempt what they are able to do as opposed to moving them to a higher class level where they will feel frustrated and hinder the other students' progress.<P>In the past I've given lessons for a group of students who would have traditionally been denied the opportunity to dance entirely. I've also integrated differently abled students into my regular classes. In each situation I've learned much about myself as a teacher and a person; and the other students in the class (both nda and challenged) have learned about acceptance, working together, and compassion. I have taught/am teaching two children with Down's Syndrome; several with Cerebral Palsy; several with behavioral problems includng ADD/ADHD; a deaf student; a woman with Multiple Sclerosis; stroke survivors; breast cancer survivors and students with severe depression. <P>Every person has gifts and every person has challenges--some are just easier to recognize than others.....finding the gift that each student has to give you is the true challenge of teaching.<P>Jan


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 Post subject: Re: ill and at class?
PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2001 7:55 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
A while ago we had quite an interesting thread on this subject you might want to take a look at it:<P><BR><A HREF=../../../ubb/Forum7/HTML/000226.html><B>THE SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENT</B></A><BR>


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