public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Tue Nov 25, 2014 11:26 pm

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: The Faces of Competition
PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2000 5:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
Competition has two faces. The positive face has produced human beings and other species. And positive competition can spur people in many activities such as sports or even science to greater efforts.<P>Howver, a negative face often shows itself in dance/ballet class. With young children this takes place mostly spurred on by the parents. With adults (at a less than professional level) it tends to be more muted.<P> However, among teenagers it can be exceedingly destructive. I have seen it disrupt lives and change career plans. I belive the teacher can and should be aware of these pressures.<P>What do you think is the responsibility of the teacher, if any?<P>What is the teacher to do?<P>Is the teacher to some extent culpable?<P>Does competition have a place in the ballet/dance class?<P>And, if so, how can it be channeled positively?


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Faces of Competition
PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2000 7:11 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 39
Location: usa
very difficult questions that i,m sure will get strong responses. In a perfect world, we know the correct answer is healthy competion is good, i quess healthy being the key word and up for interpatation. I never equated learnig dance or dancing with competition. It seems to me comps involve, or are influenced by much more than the dancer. Though my students do not compete, we do encourage performaning and do set up alot of opportunities for them do to so, with little or no cost to them or no parental involvement other than as an audience if they choose.Yes, i do think a teacher needs to seriously think about what it means to some children or parents to win or lose and even a teacher with the best intentions goes in it ot win it and knowingly or not passes that on to the student/parent.I know there is the losing gracefully argument, but i feel i can transfer that lesson to what it feels like to not have a a great performance. Well, im just going to say it, i don't like comps.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Faces of Competition
PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2000 8:06 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
Well, actually I didn't mean competition as when a student goes to an event to compete.<P> I meant competition such as rivalry in the class. When they compare themselves against one another. When they ridicule one another.<P>But I suppose that organized dance competitions could feed into classroom rivalry. <P>I have seen teenage girls do some very destructive things to one another in classroom rivalry. However in other cases natural competitiveness in the classroom can elevate everyone's effort. I think the teacher has a part in this.<P>And so I ask again - What is the teacher's responsibiliy in setting or affecting the tone of rivalry? How can the teacher intervene? Should the teacher intervene?<P><p>[This message has been edited by Basheva (edited November 16, 2000).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Faces of Competition
PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2000 8:54 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 39
Location: usa
sorry for the misinterpetation,the clarification calls for much deeper thought and i will respond if think i can make a worthwhile contribution:-).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Faces of Competition
PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2000 12:41 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
The fault is mine "J" - I should have been clearer. <P> I will be very interested to hear what you have to say and what you think about this important matter.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Faces of Competition
PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2000 7:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Oct 11, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13
Location: Tulsa, OK, USA
I have always tried to teach my daughter to admire dancers who are more advanced because they have worked hard and share a common love for dance. Being jealous is a waste of energy and does not make anyone a better dancer or anything else for that matter. It is difficult, however to deal with other students and parents who look at more advanced students and frown because they or their child have not achieved the same amount of accomplishment. Students need to be taught to be thankful for more advanced dancers in their studio, as to have something to aspire. Unfortunately in our drive through convenience society, hard work, and dedication is a concept too difficult a task for many. So many students want instant perfection and it is everyone elses fault when they do not reach their best. Teachers have a difficult job, especially when they must teach not only dance, but try to save peace at the studio. The sad thing is so much studio jealousy is perpetuated from the parent to the child. <P> <P>------------------<BR>ap's mom<p>[This message has been edited by ap's mom (edited November 16, 2000).]

_________________
ap's mom


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Faces of Competition
PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2000 4:00 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Sep 23, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 76
Location: BC , Canada
Here is an attempt to answer the questions.<P>What do you think is the responsibility of the teacher, if any?<BR>--- The responsibility of the teacher in this, is to treat each student with respect. Be partial in the classroom, be careful not to give the impression that they are showing favoritism. give equal encouragement to all students.<P>What is the teacher to do?<BR>---personally I think that when unhealthy compeativeness rears it's ugly head the teacher (if witness to it) should hold a no tollerance policy. By word and by deed encourage repectful behaviour between students. When a student is behaving disrespectfully towards another that student should recieve a reprimand for the behavior.<P>Is the teacher to some extent culpable?<BR>--- Yes to some extent, if it is a common or repeated behavior. The odd incedent is not within the teachers power to control, however when it is a persistant "attitude" within the class room then I have always believed that the root of the problem could be traced to the existing leadership.<P>Does competition have a place in the ballet/dance class?<BR>---No, the dance class is a place of work. Students & teachers must realise that all students do some things well, no students do all things well. Each has their challenges. The focus should be on individual attainment in a safe learning environment...competativeness can wait until it is time to begin the audition process, in that venue at may have some useful purpose. In the dance class it only creates discontent. It is better to strive towards comraderie with students helping and supporting each others efforts.<P>And, if so, how can it be channeled positively?<BR>----first by example, with the teacher setting the tone for the classroom. Seconldy by encouraging students to support each other and use this venue to develope healthy friendships. Make it clear that there is a no tolerance policy for destructive behaviour, acknowledge feelings of envy, they are natural...however it is what we do with those feelings that is at times unacceptable. The teacher sets the tone for a healthy learing environment, be open, honest & treat others respectfully.<P>A quote by a wise fellow: <P>"respect is not earned, it is a given, all people deserve to be treated with respect.....it is trust that is earned"<BR>

_________________
<BR>Ramona Hartley<BR>


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Faces of Competition
PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2000 7:38 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
Very thoughtful Rabbit - and I agree with every word.<P>At one time I took over a class that had been taught by a teacher who showed very distinct favoritism to one group in the class. This essentially divided the class into two segments; the "A" group and the "B" group. The "A" group always stood in front of the class and were very rude and pushy to the "B" group. After a while I realized that the "B" group were actually the hard workers the "A" group thought they didn't need to work at all. <P>A recital was upcoming and I was asked by one of the girls how they were going to be lined up - their placement- in the dance on stage. I said each girl would audition for a spot - indivdually. The "B" group immediately began to work at learning the choreography. The "A" never really tried - they thought that somehow they were so great they didn't need to work at anything.<P>Came the day of audition - and each one of the "B" group girls did well. Each of the "A" group girls failed the audition. The "B" group therefore found themselves in the front. As you can imagine all h**l broke loose. Parents were in an uproar. <P>However, I explained to the parents I had announced this audition months in advance. Each girl had made her decision as to whether or not to learn the choreography. And I asked the parents would they really want their daughter in the front of the stage not knowing the choreography? <P>But the uproar continued so I invited all the parents and girls to a second audition - and the parents could see for themselves that their daughters had not bothered to learn the choreography - and my decision was upheld. <P>And, for the first time in the history of that studio the girls who really worked hard and learned got the "place" they deserved. Eventually the others drifted away and an atmosphere of normal camaderie was restored to the class. As new members joined they were welcomed and the girls took great care to treat the newcomers with the respect they had missed when they were newcomers.<P>It gave me some really hellish days - but it was well worth it.<P>One thing I could never abide in the class either when I was a student or when I was a teacher was arrogance. Everyone's work deserves respect.<P>But I have seen teachers who actually foster rivalry in class - and I often wonder what their motives are - a sense of power?


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Faces of Competition
PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2000 11:19 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Nov 16, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 7
My dance teacher tries not to have competion and make everyone equal and you dance to have fun. Like we can only wear black leotards and only wear skirts and other colored leotards at the last week of the month. Also, she won't give us our cecchetti exams back. She'll just let us know we passed and tell us a few of the comments the judges put down. Even though these are only little things the teacher does I think it helps effectively elimate some competition.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Faces of Competition
PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2000 4:50 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
I think you are right Stacey - your teacher sounds like a very wise person. Very often the teacher can really add to the tension in the classroom - sometimes without even knowing it.<P>Being a teenager is a difficult time - it can be lots of fun - but also difficult. So much to learn about. And, of course dance is difficult too. <P>One thing I tried to really watch for was giggling when someone in the class tried something and didn't make it - like a poorly executed pirouette. We don't make fun of the efforts of others - we honor those efforts. But, some teachers will make cruel remarks about someone's efforts and that teaches others in the class that it is just fine to make fun. And it is not "fine" at all.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group