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 Post subject: to teach dance without a diploma ?
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 3:06 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2004 12:01 am
Posts: 15
Hello !

I want to know if i can to give ballet lessons
whithout diploma ?



Thanks !


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2006 9:57 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 25, 2002 11:01 pm
Posts: 678
Location: Petaluma, California
Hello, keyroux...I believe it depends...If a teacher has had a professional career, a "diploma" is not something that would be necessary to teach ballet. If you wanted to teach "RAD", you would need to have a certification to be able to teach this method. A person needs to have reached a certain level of proficiancy in ballet with some performance experience (I believe) in order to teach ballet.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 2006 4:47 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
From my position as an observer, not a teacher (or performer), I would add that it will also depend on where you are located, keyroux. For instance, here in the UK, I belive that it would be unlikely that a dance school would employ you without certification and there might even be a legal dimension to consider. I have also heard the view that a well-trained (in teaching as well as ballet) teacher can play a very valuable role with students up to a certain level.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 01, 2006 2:22 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 3129
Location: Guildford, Surrey, UK
What Stuart says is right - it depends largely on location. It is far more common in the US for a teacher to be an ex professional dancer without a certified qualification than it is in the UK. Almost every teacher I know in the UK has a teaching qualification with one of the main societies i.e RAD, ISTD, IDTA.

I agree with Gina that it is extremely useful for a teacher to have had performance experience to pass on that dimension to students. However I also feel that the training for a teaching qualification offers a potential teacher invaluable knowledge in anatomy, child development, lesson structure and planning, how to develop students potential.

It is also useful to try and get some experience helping in classes but also observing different teachers at work.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2006 9:48 am 
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Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2004 12:01 am
Posts: 15
Thanks you for yours answer .
My question is about a legal dimension .


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2006 12:58 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 27, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 3375
Location: Canada
Keyroux, again that depends on the country in which you will be teaching.

I don't think that in any country, you would be forbidden from teaching without qualifications. It would be more a matter of getting liability insurance and permission to teach certain styles & classes and the ability to register your students for RAD or ITSD exams.

I would think that in the UK, a teacher would have a hard time getting proper insurance without qualifications. In the U.S., it would be easier, but qualifications would probably make it easier to find a decent insurance package.

Kate


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 2:25 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 24, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 19975
Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Joanne will know far more about the UK "legal dimension" than me, but a good knowledge of best practise for dealing with students woud be essential to avoid situations involving potential litigation.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 07, 2006 3:41 am 
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Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 3129
Location: Guildford, Surrey, UK
Personally i would not teach without insurance and I'm sure a lot of insurance companies in the UK would not insure without a relevant qualifications.

One of the benefits of being qualified and affiliated with a dance organisation like the IDTA is that all members get public liability insurance as part of their membership. You may need additional insurance dependent on turnover and size of business - also employers liability if you employ other teachers. For most freelance teachers public liability will be enough.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2006 9:15 am 
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Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2004 12:01 am
Posts: 15
Yes , of course i'm in uk .


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