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 Post subject: rhythm
PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2005 9:03 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 287
Location: Australia
What is the difference between the timing and the rhythm of the music?


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2005 3:21 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2000 11:01 pm
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Location: Seattle, WA. USA
Hi. I'm not sure what you mean by "timing" but rhythm -- to me -- is the pulse or the beat of the music. It's the driving energy that gives the music its shape and life.

In Western music, rhythms are often divided betwen duple and triple meters (2/2, 2/4, 4/4, 3/4, 6/8 are fairly common). Sometimes these are combined or even re-invented such as having 5/4 waltz.

If by timing you mean the relation of movement to the music, that can vary from what those who train dancers want and from what choreographers are looking for. Many ballet steps are *completed* prior to the start of the downbeat (beginning) of the music. For example, in a typical ballet exercise, if there were no introduction to the music at all, when executing say a jété or a glissade, each of these steps are done by the time count "1" occurs. We tend to call these 'and' steps -- because they are initiated on "and" and completed by one. Assemblés, piqués, some grand battements, and most jumps fall into this category. We could even extend it to an adagio-like movement such a développé; getting the leg out by count one.

Placement not only means body alignment but also how we place movement in relation to music. Does the choreographer prefer that we're a little ahead of the music, behind it, or completing each pose right on the center of the downbeat? Each approach has its own effect.

You can see from school to school how dancers are trained to respond (or not) to music. It's interesting observing the differences and not only one approach is more correct than the other. Hope this helps to at least partially answer your question!

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Dean Speer
ballet@u.washington.edu


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2005 1:01 am 
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Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 287
Location: Australia
thankyou very much for your reply Dean. Appreciated as always. aah a very interesting note that you made re: breathing with the music and meshing with it. It is really is something that can be learnt but something that must come from within (only my thoughts of course). With interest, I once had a ballroom class with a professional dancer who made the comment that males will listen to the music differently to that of females. A very thought provoking statement indeed! I can very well understand that comment and truly does make sense. Any guesses why? Anyway was just wondering what your opinion of this statement would be in relation to ballet in particular pas de deux? I would love to hear everyone's comments on this - Just for fun :D.
PS. Will let you know what the statement actually was. Hint: relates to beat and pulse, higher notes and musicality......

Thankyou also little tutu for your post. Excellent. Light and shade added to the dance makes it not only more interesting visually to the audience but makes it much more alive for the performer.

citibob...brilliant post as always!

Dean....your final post and final paragraph...perfect summary


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