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 Post subject: Deborah Hay
PostPosted: Fri Feb 13, 2004 5:48 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
A Four-Cornered Asylum With Solos Inside

By JENNIFER DUNNING
The New York Times
February 13, 2004

Deborah Hay has been through many choreographic transformations, beginning with relatively traditional work and then moving into the experimentalism of the 1960's and on to "protofolk" pieces, as the dance writer Don McDonagh put it.
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 Post subject: Re: Deborah Hay
PostPosted: Sun Feb 29, 2004 8:56 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
Delicious Colliding

By DEBORAH JOWITT
The Village Voice
February 25 - March 2, 2004

In the 1960s, at Judson Dance Theater, Deborah Hay was one of those who experimented with task and game structures as a way of putting pieces together. Despite the developments in her aesthetic since then, she has never lost that sense of dance as serious (and sometimes playful) play with form.
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 Post subject: Deborah Hay - The Match
PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2005 2:36 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 20, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 107
Location: London, England
Deborah Hay & Guests - The Match
Purcell Room
5/5/05

It’s funny that modern choreographers - especially those veering towards the avant garde - are seen as such a serious bunch. Because in reality there’s often no-one better schooled in the absurd. Deborah Hay, veteran of the Judson Dance Theatre, is a perfect example. Her Bessie Award-winning piece The Match opens with one dancer (Wally Cardona) taking a five-minute jog around the stage. The house lights are still up. There’s no music. There may as well be a flashing sign above his head: ‘Danger, experimental art in progress!’

But after a few moments to re-tune into his station, Cardona’s antics turn out to be very amusing indeed. He plays inventively with his pedestrian material, finding infinite variations with his shuffling feet and comical expressions, and the bewildered silence is soon broken by appreciative giggles.

Cardona is joined by three more dancers, Mark Lorimer, Chrysa Parkinson and Ros Warby, who add their own oddball physiques to the frame. Accompanied only by their own incomprehensible mumbles and sighs, the quartet drift after each other in a string of seemingly half-remembered moves, travelling messily en masse. There are glimpses of familiar steps and styles - as they morph into a cool jazz troupe, for example - but it is always as if seen through some distorting mirror.

The feeling of being lost in someone else’s imagination continues as the dancers take turns centre stage, where Ros Warby produces memorable moments. Speaking in stagey whispers or singsong little girl tones that suit her tiny frame, she makes mirth out of something as incidental as the shape of her shoe. Chrysa Parkinson uses the sounds coming out of her mouth to propel her body, from the sharp blasts of a firing range to the air escaping from a deflated balloon.

Hay’s dances don’t really want to be explained; they want to be experienced. They don’t so much illustrate things we know as things we have never seen. They make complex mimes of objects and situations that have not existed until this moment, when a dancer’s body carved them out on the stage in front of us.

The second half of the programme does offer some insight into the group’s process, however, when Hay herself and Lorimer each perform a solo adaptation of the quartet. They begin with the same material but find themselves on wildly different tangents.

Hay, dressed like Pierrot, scrolls through a plethora of facades, voices, and sporting references, plus a chant here, a flamenco pose there and numerous unfathomable things in between. One moment she is introverted, muttering to herself, the next confrontational as she addresses the audience, sizing up the opposition. But her improvisatory attitude masks a very precise performer underneath.

In his solo, Lorimer is more of a clown - although he’s not wearing the Pierrot costume, opting for thermal long johns instead. He again starts with the jogging motif, finding squeaky boards on the stage and treading them over again and again. Silly noises are his forte. And he deftly manoeuvres round his selection of multiple personalities, milking the audience’s reaction as he goes.

There are plenty of imaginative and enjoyable moments here, but the problem is that Hay’s work is surely intended to be much more than just comedy. It is a fascinating exploration for its performers, and a unique experience for an audience on the same wavelength, but between tonight’s sporadic moments of brilliance there seems to lie a lot of white noise.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 3:38 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
A Mad Scientist of Dance Plays in the Lab
by CLAUDIA LA ROCCO for the New York Times

A passer-by could be forgiven for thinking she had stumbled into an asylum, and not a temporary laboratory for the choreographic research of Deborah Hay. The five dancers, themselves celebrated choreographers, will perform her latest experiment, "O, O," this week at Danspace Project.

Roughly 50 minutes long, it is danced in the round and builds off a spare structure. Though the choreography is set, the moment-to-moment movement is far less important than each dancer's attention to and perception of time and space.

published: January 22, 2006
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2006 3:56 pm 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
May the Circles Be Broken and Unbroken
by JOHN ROCKWELL for the New York Times

"O, O" has something to do with circles within circles (you can see that toward the end, when single dancers revolve around the huddled group) and something to do with cells facing every which way in the human body. Ms. Hay spoke in advance interviews of a political component, but that was hard to discern, apart from a possible image of a praying Muslim and the faux-patriotic visors on each chair. And then there is her mock Wholegg Theory, postulating the space between performer and audience as something tangible.

published: January 28, 2006
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2007 11:24 am 
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Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 8612
Location: El Granada, CA, USA
Deborah Hay and her company are in San Francisco this week.

Quote:
Peak performance
'Mountain'
Dance piece by Deborah Hay was inspired by Washington state's Mount Rainier
Reyhan Harmanci

Thursday, March 29, 2007

Hay says that she had an idea for a piece when she went to the Northwest for a festival performance at the annual Portland Institute for Contemporary Art event in 2004. Through PICA she met some French artists -- she says she continues to have work in France thanks to that connection -- but the piece she was thinking about got put on hold. Then, after teaching a workshop in Seattle, three dancers got together and got funding through PICA to commission Hay for a project that became "Mountain."


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