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 Post subject: Richard Alston Dance Company 2007
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 2007 3:20 pm 
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Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 6778
Location: Estonia
Quote:
Portrait of the artist: Richard Alston, choreographer
by LAURA BARNETT for the Guardian
published: March 27, 2007

Who or what have you sacrificed for your art?

A normal life. I'm obsessive and work-centric, and I don't have a family. It may be deeply unhealthy, but I'm perfectly happy.
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Last edited by kurinuku on Thu Apr 12, 2007 6:18 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 06, 2007 2:14 am 
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Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 6778
Location: Estonia
Quote:
Richard Alston
by DEBRA CRAINE for the Times
published: March 30, 2007

Richard Alston is so old-school it’s almost endearing. He’s been making dances for nearly 40 years and continues to make them just as he pleases, even if that means he’s completely out of step with a younger, more unruly generation. Pure dance, pure music, no trimmings: his is a rigorously applied aesthetic that seems hopelessly old-fashioned amid the hurly burly of most contemporary dance.

Fingerprint, Alston’s newest creation, is a case in point.
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Quote:
Richard Alston Dance Company
by JUDITH MACKRELL for the Guardian
published: March 31, 2007

Red Run is a hard act to follow, but Martin Lawrance's Brink acts as a surprising counterpoint. Set to Japanese tango music, it relocates the feisty, erotic rhetoric of tango to a new 21st-century cultural mix. Particularly arresting is the middle duet in which Lawrance and an elegantly pregnant Sonja Peedo alternate between delicate, almost origami gestures of courtship and an argumentative race for primacy.
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What a smoothie
by LUKE JENNINGS for the Observer
published: April 1, 2007

If I were to define the choreography of Richard Alston in a single word - sad I know, but this is the kind of thing that keeps us dance folk awake at night - I'd describe it as Yang. In Chinese metaphysics, Yang is the bright, masculine, solar principal, while Yin is feminine, mysterious and lunar.

Yin-inclining choreographers might include Lev Ivanov, who created the white acts of Swan Lake; Antony Tudor, whose mutely anguished Lilac Garden and The Leaves Are Fading negotiate the territory of the female heart with such acuity; and the high priestess of alienation herself, Pina Bausch.
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2007 8:16 am 
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Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 6778
Location: Estonia
Quote:
Why do bumps have to be such a grind?
by JENY GILBERT for the Financial Times
published: April 8, 2007

As often happens too, I was flummoxed by Alston's description of it. "The Capriccio," he writes, "paints a little picture", scenes of Bach's brother Jakob leaving home, "the sadness... softened with humour and wit". I saw no allusions to leave-taking, still less humour or wit. Yet, essentially, the material comes from the same stock cupboard that supplied Alston's responses to Schubert and Britten: the convex leaps with umbrella-spoke arms, the polite connections, the soft edges.
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