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 Post subject: Boston Conservatory Dance Theater
PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2001 10:24 am 
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A preview:<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><B>Conservatory dancers put on grand `Airs'</B><P>Vicki Sanders, Boston Herald<P>A certain practiced beauty emerges when the student dancers at the Boston Conservatory's Dance Theater II are thrust into the choreographic arms of masters such as Paul Taylor and Lar Lubovitch. The dancers enter the embrace with such unbridled exuberance that it's possible to forgive the seam-showing mechanics of their dancing.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.bostonherald.com/entertainment/arts_culture/danc02242001.htm" TARGET=_blank><B>More</B></A>


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Conservatory Dance Theater
PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2001 8:36 pm 
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Theodore Bale writes about the Conservatory's summer program:<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><B>Conservatory keeps up beloved `Traditions'</B><P>Theodore Bale, Boston Herald<P>The dance department at the Boston Conservatory has always kept one foot planted firmly in the real world. During the past academic year, for example, dance majors at the school had the opportunity to perform in productions of works by Paul Taylor, Jose Limon, Anna Sokolow, Luis Fuente and Lar Lubovitch. It's a wonderful way for students to build their resumes before they graduate, and a great chance for Boston audiences to see classics from the modern repertory.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.bostonherald.com/entertainment/arts_culture/danc07062001.htm" TARGET=_blank><B>More</B></A>


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Conservatory Dance Theater
PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2001 11:49 am 
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A review:<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Students show their versatility<P>Theodore Bale, Boston Herald<P>For years it's been evident that students at The Boston Conservatory receive some of the finest training in the country. And last night's fall dance program, which featured premieres by Laszlo Berdo and Sean Curran, as well as a rousing 1984 work from dance legend Murray Louis, showed the students at an astonishing level of versatility, strength and artistic sophistication.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><a href=http://www.bostonherald.com/entertainment/arts_culture/cons11162001.htm target=_blank>More</a>


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Conservatory Dance Theater
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2001 5:38 am 
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From the Boston Globe:<P><B>A smart mix of modern and classical</B><P><BR>By Thea Singer, Globe Correspondent, 11/17/2001<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>A concert by the Boston Conservatory Dance Theater is a compendium of items, expertly selected to expose the public to those things that are worth resurrecting as well as the provocative among the new. The latest performance is no exception. The three dances on the program span 17 years and embrace choreography ranging from the classical to the post-postmodern. What a treat it is to see the work of a master pulled from the archives and brought to life alongside dances making their debut.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/321/living/A_smart_mix_of_modern_and_classical+.shtml" TARGET=_blank><B>MORE...</B></A> <BR>


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Conservatory Dance Theater
PostPosted: Sat Dec 08, 2001 1:35 pm 
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MARCIA B. SIEGEL - Boston Phoenix, 12.08.01:<BR> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><B>Three-way stretch<BR>Laszlo Berdo, Seán Curran, and Murray Louis</B><P>Two new dances and a revival made up Boston Conservatory Dance Theater’s fall concert last weekend. All three had 20th-century scores that might be called interpretations of vernacular or popular music, and each was set in a different idiom of dance modernism.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><B>more...</B>


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Conservatory Dance Theater
PostPosted: Sat Feb 22, 2003 10:43 am 
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In the Boston Globe, Thea Singer writes about the BCDT's latest performance.

Quote:
Dancers look lively leaping among styles

The Boston Conservatory Dance Theater is on a mission: to school not just its students but also the public in the classics from both the ballet and the modern traditions. It’s an admirable goal, achieved in part through the staging, by noted professionals, of pieces by modern legends such as Jose Limon and Murray Louis whose works would otherwise probably never see the light of day in these parts.
More...


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Conservatory Dance Theater
PostPosted: Wed Nov 19, 2003 6:07 am 
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From Thea Singer in the Boston Globe:

Quote:
Dances show versatility, historic perspective

The Boston Conservatory Dance Theater is obsessed with context. In its shows, it doesn't just present dances; it raises questions about where those dances belong in history and how each has led to or grown from others.

Friday night was no exception. The three works on the program could not have been more different. Laszlo Berdo's ''Opus 1,'' presented in a premiere, is a straight-ahead classical ballet, toe shoes and all; it springs directly from the music. Jose Limon's ''Missa Brevis'' (1958) is an example of modern dance with a capital M: Eschewing balletic prettiness, it's a communal cry in the early modern style, complete with architecturally poised masses and aching thrusts. Meaning drives its form. Diane Arvanites-Noya and Tommy Neblett's ''Knowing We Can Never Know,'' another premiere, takes Limon's narrative approach into the 21st century. It's a roiling, boiling pot of emotion shaped not so much by patterns as by movement motifs. The dancers sprint from style to style with impressive ease, embodying some of them rapaciously, others more tentatively.
More...


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Conservatory Dance Theater
PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2003 7:37 am 
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From Marcia Siegel in the Boston Phoenix:
Quote:
The rose and the scimitar
The Kirov’s Fokine, plus Boston Conservatory


....
BOSTON CONSERVATORY is the main professional school for dancers here besides Boston Ballet, and its concerts always feature great music performed live by the music students.
More... (Scroll past Kirov review to find this.)


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Conservatory Dance Theater
PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2004 1:41 pm 
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From the Boston Globe:

[url=http://www.boston.com/news/globe/living/articles/2004/02/15/passing_down_the_moves_of_a_modern_pioneer/]Passing down the moves of a modern pioneer
Yuriko teaches works of mentor Martha Graham
[/url]

Quote:
.... Now 84, [Yuriko's] traveling around the country reconstructing Graham dances for dance companies, universities, and schools, often donating her services. Her self-described Arigato Project -- "thank you" in Japanese -- is a way of sharing with the young dancers what she learned from her master teacher.


<small>[ 15 February 2004, 02:44 PM: Message edited by: BBalletFan ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Conservatory Dance Theater
PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2004 7:13 am 
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From Christine Temin in the Boston Globe: ‘Flight’ is grounded by its lack of substance
Quote:
Dancers want to fly as much as Icarus did: Hence all those ballets with bird protagonists. Modern dancers tend to be more grounded than their classical counterparts, but they, too, sometimes yearn to escape gravity.

Flying factors into each of the three works on this weekend’s program performed by the Boston Conservatory Dance Theater.
The three pieces are: Jose Limon’s 1966 “The Winged”, Luis Fuente’s “An Exterminating Circumdance”, and, “Severe Clear” choreographed by Amy Spencer and Richard Colton.


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Conservatory Dance Theater
PostPosted: Thu Nov 18, 2004 8:01 am 
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From Marcia Siegel in the Boston Phoenix: Wing work - Boston Conservatory Dance Theater
Quote:
Boston Conservatory Dance Theater’s concerts last weekend didn’t have their usual support from the conservatory’s fine student orchestra. Whether by choice or necessity, the absence of live music opened up some choreographic territory beyond what can be framed by a smallish ensemble of classical players. None of the recorded selections was well served by the theater’s low-fidelity sound system, though.


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Conservatory Dance Theater
PostPosted: Fri Nov 19, 2004 7:25 am 
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It's clear that neither critic nor reviewer caught the depiction of ground zero and conceptual tribute to 9/11 in "Severe Clear".

Perhaps "In Flight" more readily conjures images of birds and winged creatures vs aircraft and human chaotic response.

Or, maybe we societally have subliminially vanquished and buried the heavy aspects, finding them difficult and uncomfortable to examine and comprehend.


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Conservatory Dance Theater
PostPosted: Sat Feb 19, 2005 6:02 am 
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From Theodore Bale in the Boston Herald: Students invigorate modern legends’ work
Quote:
Boston Conservatory Dance Theater’s breathtaking new program, “Three Modern Masters,” is a welcome reminder that there was once a time when modern dance was about grandeur.

This is an extremely rare opportunity to see masterpieces by the late choreog-raphers Alwin Nikolais and Martha Graham, as well as the living legend Murray Louis.
and from Christine Temin in the Boston Globe: Troupe takes ‘Masters’ lessons to heart
Quote:
.... For dancers, the opportunities to practice the acknowledged masterpieces in the field are too few. Dance often goes unrecorded, so the people who carry important choreography in their muscles and minds are precious resources..... the performers conveyed not just steps but style. They showed Graham’s emotions, which spring from the gut; Nikolais’s geometric abstraction, which avoids emotion altogether; and Louis’s rambunctious acrobatics. The flavor of each work was distinct and nuanced.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2005 9:14 am 
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From Theodore Bale in the Boston Herald:
Quote:
Conservatory honors legendary Louis
Less than a week after his 79th birthday, Boston Conservatory Dance Theater pays Louis homage in Boston tonight through Sunday, and again next month in New York at Hunter College. The program, “A Tribute to Murray Louis,” features three highlights from his illustrious career.

More...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2005 8:52 am 
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From Debra Cash in the Boston Phoenix:
Quote:
Dancespeak
Boston Conservatory’s Murray Louis tribute

....
When Yasuko Tokunaga decided to create a tribute to American choreographer Murray Louis, she allowed the Boston Conservatory’s pre-professional students to focus their attentions more clearly than they can in mixed rep. It was more than time for a local organization to mount a Louis tribute: though he’s been ailing, he was on hand last Thursday night in a dapper moustache and graphic argyle sweater to accept a bouquet in appreciation of his half-century of dancing and dance making.

More....


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