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 Post subject: Re: Jose Limon Dance Company through 2002-03 Season
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2002 4:42 am 
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>. . . the original tape was damaged, the score is lost and the composer has died.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><BR>Well that's a good reason as any I've ever heard for using a new score, lol.


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 Post subject: Re: Jose Limon Dance Company through 2002-03 Season
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2002 10:33 am 
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I don't know, Marie. Maybe they should have tried harder... Image


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 Post subject: Re: Jose Limon Dance Company through 2002-03 Season
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2002 1:47 pm 
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Azlan...wow. "The Unsung" danced by all women. It was originally choreographed for all men, as you mentioned, each man representing a different famous Indian chief..Tecumseh, Sitting Bull, etc. Hmmmm...maybe we can rethink the matriarchal aspect of some tribes. I saw that piece in New York many years ago...twice actually. It is one of my favorite pieces...the cast was very outstanding. Stephen Pier (now teaches at Juilliard), Robert Swinston (has danced with Cunningham for many years), Bill Cratty and ....that's all I can remember. It's an intense piece, danced in silence. Very heroic and larger than life.


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 Post subject: Re: Jose Limon Dance Company through 2002-03 Season
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2002 4:46 pm 
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Yes, Trina, "The Unsung" was hypnotic even without music. The lack of music was made up by the sound of the feet on the floor. I can't imagine this piece with music.<p>[This message has been edited by Azlan (edited April 22, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: Jose Limon Dance Company through 2002-03 Season
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2002 7:23 pm 
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Limon Dance Company of San Jose, <BR>Olympic Arts Festival Program, <BR>April 20, 2002,<BR>Mexican Heritage Plaza Centro Cultural de San Jose<BR> <BR>By Toba Singer<P>The Olympic Arts Festival Program presented by the Limon Dance Company of San Jose made for a nice fit for a medium-sized company. The works represented a broad spectrum in modern choreography, featuring the work, "Psalm," by Limon, and a relatively recent work, "Crossroads," by veteran modern dance choreographer, Donald McKayle. <P>"In Winter," choreographed by Billy Seigenfeld, was set to a medley of jazz music, evocative of Manhattan in the fifties. With the rise in popularity of jazz vocalists such as Harry Connick in the '90s, the mood of that 1950s style has been revived. It is that autumn-in-New York transition into the early days of winter that we see in the swirling arms that describe a seasonal pitch of motion and energy that is so much present in East Coast cosmopolitan sense memory. The upper body accents in the use of extended arms and off-balance shoulder movements deliver the bustle that gets going at that time of year. As the dancers speed walk or hit a fall-and-recover kind of strut, they seem to deconstruct the gestures in jazz that abundant use has turned into cliché. Instead of the traditional "accent down" (or up) choreography, the dancers use their hands to throw outward, opening up the stage. The dancers almost become the musical instruments accompanying them; their movements mimic jazz musicians with their instruments in those vulnerable poses revealing how a surge of libido lights up a fiery riff. The costumes, blazers in various shades of brown, with street wear sheath or a-a-line skirts in blurry prints for the women in the first segment, detract from making this happen as completely as it could. The blazers restrict movement, and the muddy designs, intended perhaps to be anti-theatrical and anti-chic, end up hiding the dancers‚ otherwise clean lines. <P>The second segment opens with a piano intro and a trumpet solo, as the dancers creep surreptitiously onto the stage, draped in black capes, which they hold closed for the duration. The music is languid while a soloist on all fours seems to suck up the floor and pull the energy toward it, stretching head and legs upward in a "Sea Shadow" kind of expiatory ritual. The corps of dancers in their capes respond reactively to the solo, as winter attends the death agony of the more forgiving seasons preceding it. The corps capes predictably come off at the close of the piece as the heat exchange from the solo succeeds in removing the chill from the winter air. <P>"Etude" is a solo choreographed by Carla Maxwell, and danced by Jonathan Riedel to music by Schubert with lyrics in German. Sorry not to know what "Spinnrade" in the music's title means, but I suspect it is linked to the fluid spirals danced so evenly by Mr. Riedel. The otherwise beguiling choreography did not explore the musical intervals in this piece as fully as I would have liked, and therefore made it seem that Mr. Riedel was slightly off the music, even though he was not. That aside, the piece was haunting and conveyed a classical and layered, but sculpted sensibility. <P>"Cross Roads" to music by James Newton composed for the piece, was my companion's favorite of the program. Having taken class with Mr. McKayle way back in the early sixties at New Dance Group in New York, and having felt embarrassingly grateful whenever I did, I found myself oddly grateful once again. This time, instead of embarrassment, I felt sheer delight, as if having been invited along on location. Other critics have guessed that the pea-green-cum-chartreuse and cerise costumes indicate a color-war theme. I am not sure that all of the strife onstage occurred along color lines. What I am sure of is that the cockatiel-inspired costumes lifted the color of the choreography up and out, creating a kind of fourth dimension. Inside this piece is every manner of struggle and dialectic that is present in nature, where the axes cross, as they are lit to do onstage. Elements consolidate, fissure, become one again, in a dazzling continuum of redefinition. Whether the dancers mirror each other in a wide box step where heads are off center, or execute a fully-articulated pas de deux on the floor, every gesture explores a new configuration. We find that motion in the rain forest follows the meandering of the river, or the implied samba tempo of its natural inhabitants. Each dancer is his or her own Terpsichorean Swiss Army knife, with all the needed implements contained in a compact, but moving treasure trove. Robert Regala, and all the couples, give an extra push here --right over the top.<P>"Psalm," with its rapturous choreography by Limon, opens the company's lens to its fullest exposure. Piano, drum, piano, drum, curtain, is the sequence set for the pairs of dancers who break into searching, low triplets as canticle-style music, newly-composed by Jon Magnussen, begins. (Though the program notes suggest that the piece was inspired by "ancient Jewish tradition," the lyrics are in Latin.) An ensemble of dancers in slate-colored costumes, accented in blue and red, fill every diagonal. They move in centripetal off-balance chasses with arms raised to create a swirl of motion at the center of the stage. Fulcrum-like turns, with arms extended, break out as the music crescendos and diminuendos around the chant of "Alleluia." Mr. Regala appears, as gifted as his name implies, and crosses in front of the ensemble in large, loose lunges, reminiscent of Mary Hinkson. His back is so flexible and expressive that the simplest stretch is like a splayed tapestry. The floor seems to roll under him, as he pairs ecstasy with grief. The corps appears to wash away tears with low, "water-wheel" off-balance strides across the stage. Technically, this piece seems to challenge and show the dancers' fatigue more than the others. It looks under-rehearsed and some of the women dancers have difficulty balancing or holding positions more here than in the other pieces. Nonetheless, its power as a work of evangelical completeness, reveals that Mr. Limon's dance architecture remains a cornerstone of the American tradition.<P>

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 Post subject: Re: Jose Limon Dance Company through 2002-03 Season
PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2002 6:53 pm 
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Toba, thank you so much for this review!! I have seen the Limon Company perform many times when I lived in New York, and had some friends who were in the company. But I havent' seen the company for a long while now. They don't tour to the Pacific Northwest too much! But your review brought back many memories!! Thank you!


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 Post subject: Re: Jose Limon Dance Company through 2002-03 Season
PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2002 7:44 pm 
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I am so excited to find out that the Limon Company is coming to Meany Theater, Seattle, next winter, January, 2003. That's great!! I haven't seen them in years! Also, included in the season at Meany is Nacho Duato's company, National Dance Company of Senegal, Mark Morris (of course!!), and that's about all I can remember. I will try to update!!!


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 Post subject: Re: Jose Limon Dance Company through 2002-03 Season
PostPosted: Sat Oct 05, 2002 3:14 pm 
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Location: Montreal, QC, Canada
SARAH BRYAN MILLER - St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 10/05/2002:
Quote:
Preserving modern dance

The question of how to preserve a dance legacy is a difficult one. "Because we don't study choreography, we're influenced by what we see - so the dancing can make or break a performance," says (Carla) Maxwell. "Dance is like an oral tradition; we pass it on from artist to artist. Our effort has been, first, to define ourselves."
more...

<small>[ 10-05-2002, 17:17: Message edited by: Marie ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Jose Limon Dance Company through 2002-03 Season
PostPosted: Fri Nov 01, 2002 1:20 am 
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<img src="http://forum.criticaldance.com/features/images/limon&jazz.jpg" alt="" />

Quote:
Criticaldance.com
Limón and Jazz: The Limón Dance Company at the 2002 Cultural Olympiad
By Karen Webb

Modern dance pioneer José Limón once summed up his attitude toward his art this way. "The dance offers you a vision of your humanity: ennobled, winged, soaring." When the Limón Dance Company presented Limón and Jazz, the Cultural Olympiad's sole dance event in an Ogden venue, audiences got the opportunity to see just what he meant.
More...

<small>[ 05 January 2003, 06:34 PM: Message edited by: Azlan ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Jose Limon Dance Company through 2002-03 Season
PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2002 4:58 pm 
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This company will be in the Bay Area briefly next week. From the Examiner...

Quote:
Limón lives on
By Lauren Gallagher
Of The Examiner Staff

The Limón Dance Company carries a heavy heritage. The ensemble's founding father, José Limón, was one of the most significant modern choreographers of the 1950s and '60s, a disciple of seminal dancemaker Doris Humphrey.

But while most heritage modern dance companies fall by the wayside, and even the iconic Martha Graham Dance Company struggles to stage a long-awaited comeback next year, LimŖn's 55-year-old troupe lives on. It now straddles both time and geography, dividing itself between San Jose and New York City, Limón masterworks and contemporary commissions. The company visits San Francisco for the first time in 28 years with a one-night-only performance Monday at the Cowell Theater.
more...


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 Post subject: Re: Jose Limon Dance Company through 2002-03 Season
PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2002 5:26 pm 
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Location: El Granada, CA, USA
And From the San Jose Mercury News.

Quote:
LIMON DANCE COMPANY REVIVES FOUNDER'S RHYTHMIC MASTERPIECE
By Anita Amirrezvani
Mercury News

When the Limón Dance Company's ``The Unsung'' made its debut as a work-in-progress in New York in 1970, the audience's reaction at first was anguishing and then gratifying.

``There was absolute silence when we finished,'' remembers Gary Masters, now associate professor of dance at San Jose State University. ``And then thunderous applause.''
more...

<small>[ 05 January 2003, 06:33 PM: Message edited by: Azlan ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Jose Limon Dance Company through 2002-03 Season
PostPosted: Sat Nov 23, 2002 10:30 am 
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From Limon Dance Company Revives Masterpiece About Indian Chiefs by Anita Amirrezvani, San Jose Mercury News:

Quote:
When the Limón Dance Company's ``The Unsung'' made its debut as a work-in-progress in New York in 1970, the audience's reaction at first was anguishing and then gratifying.
more...


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 Post subject: Re: Jose Limon Dance Company through 2002-03 Season
PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2003 11:02 am 
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The Limon Company will be performing January 23-25 at Meany Hall in Seattle. A preview piece by Brangien Davis in the Seattle Times:

http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=limon17&date=20030117


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 Post subject: Re: Jose Limon Dance Company through 2002-03 Season
PostPosted: Fri Jan 24, 2003 12:01 pm 
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A recent preview piece for the January 23-25 performances at Meany Hall in Seattle, by Carole Beers in the King County Journal:

http://www.kingcountyjournal.com/sited/story/html/118976


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 Post subject: Re: Jose Limon Dance Company through 2002-03 Season
PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2003 11:55 am 
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Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Reviews of The Limon Company's performances at Meany Hall in Seattle, January 23-25.

Philippa Kiraly in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer:

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/classical/105722_limon25q.shtml

and Mary Murfin Bayley in the Seattle Times:

http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=limon25&date=20030125


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