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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet -- 2014-2015 Schedule
PostPosted: Tue Oct 14, 2014 11:24 am 
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In the New York Times, Siobhan Burke reviews the Wednesday, October 8, 2014 performance of "Classic NYCB," including Jerome Robbins' "Interplay," Balanchine's "Chaconne," Christopher Wheeldon's "After the Rain" pas de deux, and Justin Peck's "Everywhere We Go."

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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet -- 2014-2015 Schedule
PostPosted: Wed Oct 15, 2014 11:46 am 
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In the New York Times, Brian Seibert reviews the Friday, October 10, 2014 performance of Balanchine's "Square Dance," "The Steadfast Tin Soldier" and "Le Tombeau de Couperin," Christopher Wheeldon's "This Bitter Earth" and Jerome Robbins' "The Concert."

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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet -- 2014-2015 Schedule
PostPosted: Wed Oct 15, 2014 11:57 am 
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An Associated Press tribute to retiring principal dancer Wendy Whelan.

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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet -- 2014-2015 Schedule
PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 9:12 am 
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New York City Ballet
David H. Koch Theater
Lincoln Center
New York, New York

October 11, 2014 M & E

“Chaconne,” “Interplay,” “After the Rain (pas de deux),” “Everywhere We Go”
“Morgen,” “Clearing Dawn,” “Funerailles,” “Belles-Lettres,” “Pictures at an Exhibition”

-- by Jerry Hochman

For New York City Ballet, a four week season is relatively short. But this brief Fall season has already sparkled with a glorious evening dedicated to significant Balanchine/Tchaikovsky ballets, a similar evening devoted to Balanchine/Stravinsky, and a program of pieces by contemporary choreographers, including four world premieres. This past Saturday, I had the opportunity to see a more homogenized program at the matinee performance: two classics – George Balanchine’s “Chaconne” and Jerome Robbins’s “Interplay,” and two contemporary pieces – the “After the Rain Pas de Deux” by Christopher Wheeldon, and Justin Peck’s “Everywhere We Go;” and in the evening to see new casts in two of the contemporary ballets on the ‘contemporary choreographers’ program, as well as a second viewing of Alexei Ratmansky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition.”

The highlights of the day were the performances by Ashly Isaacs and Russell Janzen, both members of NYCB’s extraordinarily strong corps (though one expects that their status will be upgraded during the next round of promotions).

After several noteworthy outings a few seasons ago, Ms. Isaacs disappeared from view (presumably to nurse an injury), returning last spring essentially where she left off, with performances memorable not only for the quality of her execution, but also for the sense of drama that seems to come naturally to her. As Hippolyta in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” for example, she brought a human quality to her portrayal of the Amazon queen that made her character not only dominating, but appealing. In Saturday’s two performances, she continued her streak of quality performances.

In the afternoon, Ms. Isaacs assayed one of the primary roles in Mr. Peck’s 2013 hit, “Everywhere We Go.” Particularly in partnered segments with Amar Ramasar, Ms. Isaacs, who debuted in the role earlier in the week, brought a different quality, a combination of fragility and strength, to the role that, to my recollection, was originally danced by Tiler Peck. But her performance in Peter Martins’s “Morgen,” in which she debuted on Thursday, was even more spectacular, and more surprising. After the Fall season’s opening night gala, I praised Sterling Hyltin’s performance in this role. But as wonderful as Ms. Hyltin’s performance was, Ms. Isaacs equaled it – but in a way that made the role look a bit different. Ms. Isaacs does not have the same physical appearance as Ms. Hyltin, who is rail thin and dances light as a feather; Ms. Isaacs, though also dancer thin, has a soft--looking presence that meshes with a powerful appearance and style. The result doesn’t so much make her appear solid as unintentionally sensual. The difference is slight (for all her ethereality, Ms. Hyltin can look powerful and sensual also), but it’s there. For example, in one moment in the piece when she runs across the stage and leaps backward, landing on her spine atop her partner’s extended arm, the action appears to be particularly emblematic of passion, devotion and trust. It was a remarkable performance.

Mr. Janzen has excelled since he seemed to emerge from nowhere to partner Ashley Laracey as the Sugar Plum Fairy’s Cavalier last December, and then in his partnering of Teresa Reichlen in “Diamonds” two months later. Since then, although he has primarily partnered Ms. Reichlen (a stage partnership to be encouraged), he has excelled even in roles that are more dramatic and which have considerably more solo dancing opportunities (in “Davidsbundlertanze” last season).

On Saturday, Mr. Janzen displayed his capability and his versatility in different roles: in his debut opposite Sara Mearns as the lead pair in “Chaconne,” and in “Morgen” (a role in which he debuted earlier in the week). The former, to ballet music from Gluck’s opera, “Orpheus et Euridice,” is a ballet suite, similar in structure (though not at all in style) to “Tchaikovsky Suite No. 3” in that the parts don’t necessarily flow consistently throughout the piece, but this matters not at all. Mr. Janzen excelled in partnering Ms. Mearns (to my knowledge the first time they’ve been paired) in the lovely and gentle opening movement, through to the pas de deux and the ballet’s conclusion. In “Morgen,” he provided the same level of security to each of the three ballerinas he took turns partnering: Ms. Isaacs, Ms. Reichlen, and Rebecca Krohn.

If Mr. Janzen can be faulted at all, it’s that he still moves with a certain wooden quality (not unusual, perhaps, for someone I described on first viewing as a redwood tree of a dancer), but to me this reflects an appropriate primary concern for, and attention to, his ballerina – loosening up will come later, and he’s already displayed a promising dramatic ability.

Ms. Mearns, in her role debut as the lead ballerina in “Chaconne,” delivered a finely honed technical performance. More than that, however, she abandoned the doleful quality (or, in some ballets, feigned gaiety) that I find dominates many of her portrayals, and seemed to be enjoying herself. While she still lacks the appearance of warmth that would make her portrayals grab an audience’s heart rather than be appreciated for their technical quality, she has shown considerable improvement in this respect in performances I’ve seen in recent seasons. The “Chaconne” cast was completed by an effervescent Erica Pereira and Antonio Carmena, as well as the other featured soloists (Gwyneth Muller, Gretchen Smith, Claire Kretzschmar, Alina Dronova, Megan Johnson, Lydia Wellington, Daniel Applebaum, Allen Peiffer, and Andrew Scordato), and a solid and capable 19 dancer corps.

“Interplay,” created in 1945 (it had its NYCB premiere in 1952), is a ‘playground’ dance that remains delightful to watch even though Robbins went on to distill the theme in classics such as “West Side Story.” Lauren Lovette and Chase Finlay, one sensual and innocent, the other youthful and vigorous, led the exhilarating cast of Sara Adams, Kristen Segin, Joseph Gordon, Harrison Ball, Sebastian Villarini-Velez, and a particularly engaging Indiana Woodward.

The evening performance began with “Morgan,” which, in addition to Ms. Isaacs and Mr. Janzen, featured Ms. Krohn, Ms. Reichlen, Mr. Finlay, and Zachary Catazaro, each of whom debuted in their roles earlier in the week. All danced commendably, and, in addition to Ms. Isaacs and Mr. Janzen, Ms. Krohn and Mr. Finlay particularly excelled. Following a repeat performance of Troy Schumacher’s new ballet “Clearing Dawn,” Ms. Smith and Mr. Catazaro debuted in the roles previously danced by Ms. Peck and Mr. Fairchild in Liam Scarlett’s “Funerailles.” The duet looks somewhat different with the different cast. Mr. Catazaro is not quite as dramatic or expressive in the role as Mr. Fairchild was, but Ms. Smith is somewhat more defeated-looking than Ms. Peck, and somewhat more emotionally responsive (though the role doesn’t call for much in the way of emotion), and appeared to inhabit the role more fully. The change seems relatively minor, but the more equal emotional balance added interest to an already unusual and interesting duet, and one that I continue to like on repeat viewings – though it’s more difficult to appreciate than Mr. Peck’s “Belles-Lettres,” which followed it on the program and which remains an extraordinarily delightful piece of work.

Also looking different, but this time as a result of a second view rather than a cast change, was Mr. Ratmansky’s new ballet, “Pictures at an Exhibition,” which concluded the evening’s program. Whether this is a result of having a different vantage point, a second view, or changes that Mr. Ratmansky made to the choreography or the staging (I’ve heard talk of changes having been made), the piece looks tighter now, more cohesive, and certainly more coherent. But I now see that in certain of the costumes for the women, the ‘color blocks’ that I previously described are in fact circles of color, perhaps intended to mimic the Kandinsky shapes being projected on the back screen. Nevertheless, these ‘circles’ still look like blocks of gentle, flowing color when the dancers’ bodies move. (The costumes for the men, clearly, are not unitards, as they first appeared to be to me, but that carries little import). More significantly, the projected images on the upstage screen now look entirely like screenings of works by Wassily Kandinsky (or reasonable facsimiles thereof) – I saw less of the work of other ‘modern’ artists that I thought I saw on first view – perhaps I just turned away for a brief moment, or perhaps some images on the screen were cut.

But the fact that Kandinsky may be the ballet’s only European abstract expressionist reference point only supports my hypothesis that in “Pictures at an Exhibition,” Mr. Ratmansky utilizes and honors Kandinsky, a Russian-born artist who returned to Russia after the Revolution but who subsequently was directly or indirectly coerced into leaving because of official disapproval of his artwork, in the same way that the choreographer utilized and honored Dmitri Shostakovich in “The Bright Stream” and his “Shostakovich Trilogy” – and continues to covertly criticize Soviet Communist artistic orthodoxy in the process. Indeed, the tightness of the concluding segment, ‘The Great Gate of Kiev’, now bears (to my recollection) a similarity to certain moments in “Piano Concerto #1,” the last piece in the Trilogy, in which dancers at times mill about the stage apparently dreaming of, or anticipating, a change in the political climate. And I admire the piece even more now than I did at its premiere.

Providing corps dancers like Ms. Isaacs and Mr. Janzen with the opportunities to grow before an audience over time, and to excel, has been a hallmark of NYCB in recent seasons – in part, of course, this is because there are plenty of roles to go around, but also because the company, and Mr. Martins, seem intent on developing dancers from within, knowing that the company’s future is as critical as its past and present. Everyone, it seems, is given a chance to perform and to grow – among the nineteen dancer corps in “Chaconne,” for example, were seven apprentices. And when a company can absorb the loss, for a limited, albeit significant, period of time, of ‘star’ dancers (in a company that supposedly has no stars) of the caliber of Ms. Peck, Mr. Fairchild, and Megan Fairchild, who have been given the opportunity to pursue other interests; the recent retirement of seasoned principals such as Janie Taylor, Jenifer Ringer, and Jonathan Stafford; as well as the inevitable injuries that temporarily sideline certain key dancers, without blinking (or importing guest artists); it not only evidences NYCB’s extraordinary depth, from principals to corps, but is testament to the principle that growth from within is essential.

And with respect to retiring dancers, the penultimate dance on Wednesday afternoon’s program was the “After the Rain Pas de Deux,” performed by Wendy Whelan and Craig Hall. It was given an extraordinary rich, delicate and powerful performance by both dancers (Mr. Hall is a superb partner, and his partnering of Ms. Whelan here was particularly exceptional). In my review of the opening night gala, I mentioned that Ms. Whelan’s curtain calls at the conclusion of her performance that night were greeted with extended, thunderous applause – something that I anticipated would be the case in each of her performances this season. I was only half right. The thunderous applause is still there, but this time (and I’ve been told has been the case at all recent performances) the audience rose en masse to salute her.

On Saturday evening, at the conclusion of Ms. Whelan’s farewell performance, don’t be surprised if the anticipated volcanic audience response registers on the Richter scale. You’ll feel it even if you can’t be there.


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet -- 2014-2015 Schedule
PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 1:39 pm 
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Marina Harss previews Wendy Whelan's retirement in the New Yorker.

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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet -- 2014-2015 Schedule
PostPosted: Fri Oct 17, 2014 1:56 pm 
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In the New York Times, Alastair Macaulay reviews the Wednesday, October 15, 2014 performance of Jean-Pierre Frohlich's "Varied Trio (in four), Troy Schumacher's "Clearing Dawn," Liam Scarlett's "Funerailles," Peter Martins' "Todo Buenos Aires" and Justin Peck's "In Creases."

NY Times


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet -- 2014-2015 Schedule
PostPosted: Sun Oct 19, 2014 6:15 pm 
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Alastair Macaulay reports on Wendy Whelan's farewell performance for the New York Times.

NY Times


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet -- 2014-2015 Schedule
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2014 12:17 pm 
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Alastair Macaulay discusses some of the highlights of the 2014 Fall Season for the New York Times.

NY Times


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet -- 2014-2015 Schedule
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2014 12:25 pm 
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New York City Ballet
David H. Koch Theater
Lincoln Center
New York, New York

October 18, 2014

Wendy Whelan Farewell
“La Sonnambula”; “Dances at a Gathering” (excerpt); “Concerto DSCH” (excerpt); “After the
Rain Pas de Deux”; “By 2 With & From” (world premiere Wheeldon & Ratmansky)

-- by Jerry Hochman

Last night was Wendy Whelan's farewell performance with New York City Ballet, after thirty years.

That sentence alone should be sufficient to recognize and memorialize the evening and its significance. But the occasion was much more than just a farewell. For one, there was no sorrow, and no tears (at least none seen). Instead, it was a joyous celebration of a remarkable dancing career. But it also marked a turning point (yes, I use the phrase advisedly), in multiple respects, for her, for NYCB, and for NYCB audiences. It was an ending to cherish, and it marked new beginnings to embrace.

Unlike other recent 'farewells' I’ve seen, where the evening's focus is on the retiring dancer's performance in an iconic full length role, this was an evening devoted to Ms. Whelan, and to showcasing her performances in a variety of dances – some of Wendy Whelan’s Greatest Hits – that displayed her broad performing range: from Balanchine ("La Sonnambula") to Robbins (excerpt from "Dances at a Gathering") to Ratmansky (excerpt from "Concerto DSCH") to Wheeldon ("After the Rain Pas due Deux"). A delightful piece d’occasion choreographed for her by Mr. Wheeldon and Mr. Ratmansky concluded the evening.

But as beautifully as Ms. Whelan still performs them, the dances were secondary. It was all about her – as it should have been. And to the many memories I have of her over the years, the sight of Ms. Whelan jumping for joy during the series of post-performance curtain calls, and of seeing her impromptu ‘last waltz’ with former NYCB principal dancer Jacques D’Amboise, may be the fondest of them all.

It's not easy to earn the sobriquet 'soul of the company', but for much of her NYCB career, that's the way I, and others, have described her. I can't easily explain what that means - except to say that Wendy Whelan is, was, what it meant to be a NYCB ballerina. Over the years, the company has had many stars who, in one respect or another, have been flashier, or had a more devoted and vocal following. But no one, during her years with the company, embodied what post-Balanchine NYCB is more than Wendy Whelan.

To me, the ballerina who is most comparable (in terms of impact and company significance, if not style), is the Stuttgart Ballet’s Marcia Haydee, whom I have previously described as the soul of that company. During the time she danced with them, and beyond, one could not think of the Stuttgart without also thinking of Ms. Haydee. For this NYCB ballet generation, one cannot think of NYCB without thinking of Wendy Whelan.

It’s no secret that, until this farewell Fall, Ms. Whelan had performed little in recent season. (Until last month, I had not seen her dance with NYCB since the premiere of Mr. Wheeldon’s “This Bitter Earth” pas de deux at the ‘Valentino Gala’ on September 20, 2012.) But to the extent there were fewer performances of hers to see, for whatever reason, is no longer relevant, if it ever was. What is relevant is that she can still do what she has always been able to do – deliver dramatic dance expression simply, and exquisitely, by the force of her movement quality and stage persona alone. In the last major piece that I saw her dance, Jerome Robbins’s “In Memory of ...” at the ‘Robbins Award’ performance on September 30, 2011, I observed that Ms. Whelan delivered the poignancy, the dramatic range, and the tragedy inherent in the music and the choreography to perfection, and that her performance embodied her singular ability to stretch steps into dramatic expression, thereby adding immeasurably to the piece’s impact, without necessarily ‘acting’. And in two of the three pieces that comprised the mid-section of last night’s celebration, the excerpt from “Concerto DSCH” and the “After the Rain Pas de Deux” that’s exactly what Ms. Whelan demonstrated yet again.

But it’s her range that’s most remarkable to remember, and was most remarkable to have seen demonstrated again, vividly, last night. In “La Sonnambula,” she was a sleepwalking vessel possessed by a mysterious and volcanic emotional force within: her haunting expression exceeded in impact only by her still thrilling bourrees, which would have been the envy of ballerinas half her age. And yes, she could still uncannily cradle and carry Robert Fairchild in her arms without flinching, while the audience held its collective breath.

But her youthful vigor as the girl ‘in Apricot’ in the excerpt from “Dances at a Gathering” was particularly breathtaking. This excerpt, logically, should have been the toughest portrayal of the evening for her to pull off. In recent years, Ms. Whelan has grown older – a fact, not a criticism – and her experience has often appeared as a pensive, almost angry-looking, hard edge. One wouldn’t know it from this performance. She totally erased the relentlessly serious dramatic expressiveness for which she has been known recently, and replaced it with the attitude and demeanor of a … young girl. To see her prance and take chances and look youthful and cheerful and happy as a twenty-something ballerina was alone worth the price of admission. My one criticism of the evening was that Ms. Whelan’s valedictory was marked by the absence of most of NYCB’s emerging generation of young ballerinas – soloist Lauren King dancing a pas de deux in “La Sonnambula,” and principals Sara Mearns (the Coquette in the same piece) and Rebecca Krohn (in ‘Dances’) were the only exceptions. This seemed a calculated effort to avoid presenting anyone who might detract from Ms. Whelan’s being the focus of attention. If this was the explanation for their absence, however, in view of Ms. Whelan’s performance, it was unnecessary. She would have more than held her own.

The concluding Wheeldon/Ratmansky piece d’occasion, “By 2 With & From,” is a well-crafted tribute to Ms. Whelan. The title itself is, or should be, self-explanatory – but it also fits as a description of the relationship in the piece between Ms. Whelan and her two partners, Tyler Angle and Craig Hall, and perhaps of their offstage friendship and mutual respect as well. It was fun to watch and very sweet. And its final image, of Ms. Whelan lifted aloft, focused on the future, her future as a still active dancer, was pitch-perfect.

From my vantage point in the sold out house, I couldn’t see everyone who assembled onstage to honor Ms. Whelan when the performance portion of the evening ended. But it was a full stage of the dancers who had shared the evening’s program with her, abetted by current company dancers and alumni smiling and applauding, each of whom presented Ms. Whelan with a rose to add to the bouquets she had received at the performance’s end and had deposited center stage. There was Ms. Whelan saluting not only her colleagues on stage but also members of the orchestra in the pit – who stood and saluted her back. There were bouquets thrown from the standing and cheering capacity audience, and confetti. And there was a lot of love. And then, after some half dozen or more extended curtain calls, the curtain came down for the final time.

During the mid-section of the performance, while she was changing costume in the ‘pauses’ between the three pieces, filmed recordings of Ms. Whelan in various New York venues and in private interactions with other dancers were projected on a stage screen, coupled with cute-is-an-understatement filmed images of Ms. Whelan as a young dancer – a very young dancer. Accompanying the video snippets was a continuous monologue of wonderful and insightful comments and observations patched together seamlessly, which provided a glimpse into the ‘real’ Wendy Whelan. Among other things, it should be made required viewing for any young would-be ballerina who doesn’t think she can make it because she doesn’t consider herself ‘pretty’ enough. I found most enlightening Ms. Whelan’s comments about the passing of knowledge from one generation of NYCB dancers to another – for example, I recall her saying that she learned how to partner and be partnered by Heather (Watts); and she taught Mr. Angle and Mr. Hall; and they in turn teach their partners. Of course the process, the tradition, continues. It’s one of the things that makes seeing ballet over a long period of time so compelling – the knowledge that not just steps, but performance technique and insights are passed from performing generation to generation, and seen from audience generation to audience generation. At one point, Ms. Whelan also said that each generation has its own New York City Ballet. To a large extent, that torch has now been passed. Again. Marking not so much an end, as a new, and continuing, beginning.

edited several times same hour to correct some typos


Last edited by balletomaniac on Tue Oct 21, 2014 1:43 pm, edited 5 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet -- 2014-2015 Schedule
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2014 12:29 pm 
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Broadway World's item on Russell Janzen's promotion to Soloist.

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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet -- 2014-2015 Schedule
PostPosted: Wed Oct 22, 2014 4:38 am 
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balletomaniac wrote:
New York City Ballet
David H. Koch Theater
Lincoln Center
New York, New York

October 18, 2014

Wendy Whelan Farewell
“La Sonnambula”; “Dances at a Gathering” (excerpt); “Concerto DSCH” (excerpt); “After the
Rain Pas de Deux”; “By 2 With & From” (world premiere Wheeldon & Ratmansky)

-- by Jerry Hochman

Last night was Wendy Whelan's farewell performance with New York City Ballet, after thirty years.

That sentence alone should be sufficient to recognize and memorialize the evening and its significance. But the occasion was much more than just a farewell. For one, there was no sorrow, and no tears (at least none seen). Instead, it was a joyous celebration of a remarkable dancing career. But it also marked a turning point (yes, I use the phrase advisedly), in multiple respects, for her, for NYCB, and for NYCB audiences. It was an ending to cherish, and it marked new beginnings to embrace.



Thanks, Jerry, for letting us share your evening at the Wendy Whelan farewell.

Wendy Whelan has become, perhaps, The High Poet of Dance.

I only recall seeing her twice. One of those performances was a George Balanchine work, possibly Symphony in C. It was performed earlier in the day by Sara Mearns. Both artists made a fine impression. Wendy Whelan's presentation was dreamlike.

I watch After The Rain (choreographed by Christopher Wheeldon and danced with Craig Hall) over and over on the internet. It’s one of my several favorite duets. It’s also, perhaps, her finest poetic statement.

Related to this Marina Harss writes,

“But in a way, despite her success, Whelan was a late bloomer. She has said many times that it wasn’t until she started working with Christopher Wheeldon, in the early aughts, that she began to sense her own voice as a dancer. She and Wheeldon had danced together, and now she helped him find his way as a choreographer. The calligraphic lines of her body—the long, linear arms, the aristocratic Roman nose, the sinewy legs—became the basis for his style. Her diamantine edge softened into something more interesting: thoughtfulness, introspection, and a kind of self-knowledge.”

http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultur ... an-retires

Or as you have described it,

“….her singular ability to stretch steps into dramatic expression, thereby adding immeasurably to the piece’s impact, without necessarily ‘acting’.”

She is now 47? She seems much younger. I look forward to seeing her new directions while wishing that her Poetry and Delightful Youthfulness shine on as long as possible.


Added:

Here are several video glances of the career of Wendy Whelan.

After the Rain

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9IgXpa7siM

"The very final moments of Wendy's illustrious NYCB career."

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=10 ... =2&theater


For a look into the future. I particularly like the dance sequence starting at 1:03:40.

Works & Process at the Guggenheim - Wendy Whelan - Restless Creature

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcuylUiXA2s


(All videos have been posted by the performance sources)


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet -- 2014-2015 Schedule
PostPosted: Thu Oct 23, 2014 8:17 pm 
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In the New York Observer, Robert Gottlieb reviews Wendy Whelan's farewell performance as well as highlights of the Fall for Dance season.

NY Observer


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet -- 2014-2015 Schedule
PostPosted: Sat Oct 25, 2014 11:26 pm 
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Deborah Jowitt reviews the Wendy Whelan farewell performance for Arts Journal.

Arts Journal


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet -- 2014-2015 Schedule
PostPosted: Fri Jan 16, 2015 8:45 pm 
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In the New York Times, Roslyn Sulcas profiles five NYCB ballerinas -- Sara Mearns, Tiler Peck, Teresa Reichlen, Sterling Hyltin and Ashley Bouder -- as a preview of the 2015 Winter Season which begins on Tuesday, January 20.

NY Times


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet -- 2014-2015 Schedule
PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 7:29 pm 
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In the New York Times, Alastair Macaulay reviews the Tuesday, January 20, 2015 performance of Balanchine's "Serenade," "Agon" and "Symphony in C."

NY Times

Apollinaire Scherr reviews the same performance for the Financial Times.

Financial Times


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