public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Fri Oct 24, 2014 11:34 pm

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 72 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Wed Jul 07, 2010 1:53 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12415
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
In the New York Times, Claudia La Rocco reviews the Monday, July 5 performance of MacMillan's "Romeo and Juliet," with Julie Kent and Marcelo Gomes as the lead couple.

NY Times


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Sun Jul 11, 2010 5:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12415
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
In the Financial Times, Apollinaire Scherr reviews three casts of "Romeo and Juliet." Tuesday evening (Gillian Murphy and David Hallberg), Wednesday matinee (Hee Seo and Cory Stearns) and Wednesday evening (Herman Cornejo and Xiomara Reyes).

Financial Times


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Sun Jul 11, 2010 7:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2004 11:01 pm
Posts: 341
Location: New Jersey
American Ballet Theatre
Metropolitan Opera House
Lincoln Center
New York, New York

July 10M, 2010

"Romeo and Juliet"


I wish I had seen Alessandra Ferri's first MacMillan Juliet Or Diana Vishneva's. Or any of the Juliets of Lynn Seymour, on whom MacMillan created the role. And perhaps most, I wish I had seen Gelsey Kirkland's first complete performance of Juliet, though I would have felt privileged had I had the opportunity to see any of them.

But it is some consolation that I have seen Natalia Osipova's debut in the role, at yesterday's penultimate American Ballet Theatre performance of Sir Kenneth MacMillan's "Romeo and Juliet" this season at the Met.

Perhaps no relatively unknown ballerina arrived in New York with the kind of hype that greeted Ms. Osipova's guest appearances last year with ABT. After her performance of "Giselle" with ABT last year, I commented that 'the hype was right.' And after her Kitri and her debut as Aurora earlier this season, no one could seriously doubt that Ms. Osipova is a major star.

But her Juliet takes her performance quality to an even higher level.

Ms. Osipova's portrayal was not perfect - and since I appreciate the opportunity to watch a ballerina grow over time, this isn't a bad thing. Most seriously, Ms. Osipova made no attempt to get the 'edge-of-the-bed' scene in Act III right. Instead of facing the audience throughout the scene, forcing her to show - and the audience to see - what is happening inside her head as her thoughts move from despair to hope, Ms. Osipova began the scene head down, and kept it there until just before the 'light bulb' of recognition that Friar Laurence might be able to help is turned on. As a result, this manifestation of Juliet's thought process was hidden. This had to be a conscious decision - perhaps Ms. Osipova felt as if she hadn't gotten that scene 'right' yet, and didn't want to show something that she knew wasn't yet ready for prime tme. But whatever the reason, it was wrong. I'm sure it will be corrected over time, as will the 'wind-ups' to some of the transitional phrases in MacMillan's choreography. While most of the transitions from one choreographic phrase to another were surprisingly smooth for a first performance, there were noticeable times when she clearly stopped for a split second in order to ready herself for the next phrase.

Aside from these flaws, Ms. Osipova's Juliet was a triumph, not only by giving the role the depth that any successful character portrayal requires, but by already putting her own unique stamp on the role.

Ms. Osipova has what appears to be a tiny face and an elfin smile that combine to make her look like a pixie. Consequently, and not surprisingly, Ms. Osipova's Juliet was the youngest-looking Juliet I can remember. But hers was also the youngest-acting Juliet I can remember - and she did it not just by appearing to be her pixieish self, but by acting up a small storm. Paris was not only the first young man who paid attention to her, which is a frequently seen characterization, but, based on Ms. Osipova's portrayal, he may have been the first young man she'd ever been allowed to see. Ms. Osipova would look at Paris with curiosity, her head slightly cocked to the side, as if to say 'oh...so that's what a boy is like...' (which devolves, in Scene 3, after she encounters Romeo, into 'oh...that's a feeling I've never had before and it feels strange and wonderful'). My poor ability to translate Ms. Osipova's demeanor into words shouldn't diminish the significance of what she was able to display. Her Juliet was not just sweet and endearing - she also was young and innocent, and she was ready to soak up the life she was being exposed to like a sponge.

And, like all great Juliets, Ms. Osipova's characterization evolved over the course of the ballet from that initial small storm into an an emotional tempest. One of my pet peeves with Ms. Osipova to date has been her penchant for overacting, and particularly her reliance on unnecessary facial gestures as a substitute for displaying emotion in a more refined way. I expected her to overact as Juliet - it goes with the territory. But she didn't. At least until the conclusion of Act III, what I saw was a sublime dancer/actress doing what great dancer/actresses do - albeit with many more years of experience. At times I thought I was seeing Alessandra Ferri - with all the power and emotional depth that Ms. Ferri brought to this role. And at times I thought I was seeing the delicacy, lyricism and intensity that in my mind's eye is what Mis Kirkland would have looked like.

But Ms. Osipova was indisputably herself. The passion, the willfulness, the vulnerability, were all there, and every step; every gesture, every expression, was true - true to her character, and true to Ms. Osipova's stage persona. Perhaps the images that will linger most in my mind arise from Ms Osipova's unique (to me) execution of MacMillan's choreography during Juliet's dance with Paris before she agrees to submit to the marriage. It is always danced dolefully, with extraordinary sadness at the thought of what she is being compelled to do. But for Ms. Osipova, it wasn't weepy. In this mini-scene, her Juliet isn't sad, or reluctant, or exhausted by the emotional struggle. Her Juliet dances lifelessly, having to be carried and pulled by Paris, at times draped over him, with only the most limited ability to stand or move on her own. As Ms. Osipova performs it, it is an anticipatory dance of death - and it also very obviously is a parallel to the 'dance of death' in the ballet's final scene, where Juliet is being lifelessly pushed and pulled and tossed and carried by Romeo. The concept, and the execution, were brilliant. And if nothing else was sufficient to convince this viewer that Ms. Osipova's performance was more than just a really, really good debut, that did it.

And then there was the Scream that could be heard all the way back to Moscow. That's ok. She was entitled.

Curtain calls frequently seem to be as staged as the performances that precede them. But whether contrived or not, the curtain calls by Ms. Osipova and David Hallberg, her melancholy Romeo, were almost themselves worth price of admission. Ms. Osipova seemed genuinely grateful to Hallberg for helping her get through the perfromance. But she appeared overwhelmed by the well-deserved adoration that the audience was collectively showering on her. You could almost see the 'wow' in her eyes as she blew a kiss to the audience (which, from my vantage point, filled every seat and standing room position in the house). If Ms. Osipova plays her cards right, and I have no doubt that she will, this is the beginning of a very long love affair with New York audiences. And - fair warning - if Ms. Osipova returns next year (and I suspect that ABT management will do whatever it needs to do to make sure that that happens), get tickets as soon as casting is announced or be prepared to have to hang from the chandeliers.

And to those who felt that the limited opportunities to dance Juliet should have been given to deserving dancers already on the company roster rather than to a guest artist - and I was one of them - it's time to get over it. While she still has considerable maturing to do as an artist, Ms. Osipova clearly is a ballerina whose performances are events that are too important, and too precious, to miss.


Last edited by balletomaniac on Wed Jul 14, 2010 7:48 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Mon Jul 12, 2010 12:26 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12415
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Thank you for the review, balletomaniac.

Gia Kourlas in the New York Times appears to agree with you in this review of the Osipova/Hallberg "Romeo and Juliet" performance at the Saturday, July 10 matinee.

NY Times


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Mon Jul 12, 2010 3:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2004 11:01 pm
Posts: 341
Location: New Jersey
American Ballet Theatre
Metropolitan Opera House
New York, New York
July 5, 7M, 7E, 10E, 2010

“Romeo and Juliet”

While Shakespeare and Prokofiev have a little something to do with it, it is a tribute to Sir Kenneth MacMillan’s choreography for “Romeo and Juliet” that I cannot recall seeing any portrayal of MacMillan’s Juliet that was less than stellar. You do the steps competently, you show the emotion sufficiently, you get a standing ovation. Guaranteed.

Of course, it’s not that simple. Together with doing the steps and showing the emotion, there are variables that make each Juliet different, and that make some performances grab a viewer, or at least this viewer, more than others.

And so it was with the five performances of MacMillan’s “Romeo and Juliet” (including the July 10 matinee performance of Juliet by Natalia Osipova, which I discuss in a separate review) that I was privileged to see this past week, and that closed out ABT’s current season at the Met: Julie Kent’s Juliet on July 5, Hee Seo’s on the July 7 matinee, Xiomara Reyes’s on the July 7 evening performance, and Diana Vishneva’s Juliet on closing night. In totally different ways, each of the performances was magnificent. Ms. Kent displayed a passion that I had not seen in her dancing before. Ms. Reyes corrected every flaw that I had noticed when I saw her dance Juliet previously. Ms. Vishneva was as incomparable in this role as she is in every other performance she gives. And as for Ms. Seo, she simply demonstrated a level of competence and accomplishment that I would have found surprising in a ballerina who had been dancing the role for years. Perhaps because it was so unexpected, Ms. Seo’s performance, for this viewer, was the most emotionally devastating of all of them.

MacMillan’s “Romeo and Juliet” is not just about Juliet. There cannot be a successfully portrayed Juliet without a Romeo, or a successful production without the excellent work of other members of the cast. But Juliet is the physical and emotional soul of this production, as she should be, and the focus of any review must be on her portrayal. Consequently, I will address the contributions of other cast members less extensively, and necessarily less adequately, than their performances merit.

With respect to Ms. Kent, initially I have a confession. Actually two confessions. First: I have had considerable difficulty watching Julie Kent dance of late because I can’t get ‘into’ her performances, and rarely feel that she’s trying to get ‘into’ my emotional head. For me, she’s just too austere; too emotionally flat. She does the steps, does them well, but there’s no connection. Second: I was upset that she was given Juliet (and the first performance of the season, no less). I’m well aware of purportedly legendary Juliets danced by Ulanova and by Margot Fonteyn, among others, well past the point where they could pass for a teenage girl, but I have difficulty suspending my disbelief (otherwise, I guess, I’d have become an operaholic instead of a balletomaniac). And I’m equally aware of dancers who somehow manage to look – as well as act - the part no matter how much experience they’ve had (e.g., Alessandra Ferri). But for this season, considering the dearth of lead role opportunities given to soloists, I thought the opportunity to dance Juliet should have been given to another.

Well, credit where it’s due. I was wrong. At the July 5 performance, Julie Kent delivered. It was not a flawless performance, and I still would have preferred a Juliet who, to me, looked more like a Juliet. But from the balcony scene at the end of Act I on, and ably abetted by Marcello Gomes, Ms. Kent danced like a Juliet.

What made Ms. Kent’s performance was her passion - not just her passion for Romeo, which is both an essential and a given, but her passion for being passionate, for expanding MacMillan's already emotion-driven choreography to an even more feverish level. She danced with abandon, to the point where it appeared that she was pushing the choreography rather than having the choreography push her. Frankly, I didn’t think she’d do more than the steps. She did, and did so gloriously.

But her portrayal was also surprisingly limited. When she was not passionate, unfortunately, she was often blank. In her opening scenes in Act I, she was working too hard at being a teenage girl, and unless you watched the performance from a distance (i.e., without binoculars), it didn't work. When her nurse (ably portrayed, as usual, by Susan Jones) tells her she's getting to be too mature to play with dolls, Ms. Kent simply stares into space. No expression; no emotion. At the ball, before passion takes over, Ms. Kent failed to convey Juliet’s youth – her movement looked forced and artificial to me, and she seemed to have difficulty getting off the ground. Although she looked lighter than air (Ms Kent looks almost painfully thin), she didn’t move that way. And she gave a curious interpretation of MacMillan’s edge-of-the-bed scene. Her Juliet did clearly display her thought process, but what she seemed to be communicating was that she had thought of someone she could talk to about her problem, not someone who could solve her problem. So when Ms. Kent’s Juliet stood up, it seemed as if nothing had changed – there was no sense of relief.

However,once MacMillan’s passionate choreography kicked in, so did Ms. Kent. She danced as if she’d been struck by, and energized by, lightning, and I’m certain that her exaggerated passion could be felt to the top of the house. [In a way, it was the kinetic equivalent of Ethel Merman belting a tune into the cheap seats: As Ms. Merman didn’t need a microphone to amplify her voice, Ms. Kent’s passionate movement required no binoculars to register in every nook and cranny of the Met.] It was a gutsy, edgy performance.

I will not dwell long on Ms. Reyes’s Juliet, because it was a Juliet on the highest of levels in all respects, and there is simply little beyond that to say.

When I last saw Ms Reyes dance Juliet, she was still relatively new to the role and to ABT, and I observed that she had difficulty – not surprisingly – with the finer points of Juliet’s acting. In the years since then, Ms. Reyes has addressed these flaws of inexperience, and has overcome them. The moment of her recognition of pending maturity in Scene 2 of Act I was shown with appropriate apprehensiveness. Her thought process during the edge-of-the-bed scene was conveyed clearly. And her movement was infused with the passionate spirit that the production requires.

Ms. Reyes’s Romeo was Herman Cornejo. For this role, Mr. Cornejo transformed himself from a self-absorbed solo practitioner to an able and helpful partner – and he acted the part admirably. Ms. Reyes and Mr. Cornejo fit together, and appear to work together, very well. Also noteworthy in this performance were Luciana Paris’s Rosaline (who responded to Romeo’s attention with playful appreciation rather than the usual stoic toleration), and the harlots danced by Anne Milewski, Kristi Boone, and particularly Misty Copeland. Alexei Agoudine did double duty as Escalus and Friar Laurence, and acquitted himself well in each role.

As I’ve previously observed, there is no ballerina presently performing – at least none that I’ve seen – who conveys the extraordinary dramatic range, intensity, intelligence, competence, clarity, and charisma of Diana Vishneva. Every performance she gives is a performance of a lifetime – and New York balletgoers, who fill the Met to its edges to see her dance – know it.

Ms. Vishneva’s closing night Juliet was extraordinary – as it usually is. I noted some changes from her performance last year (her portrayals never seem static – if you have the opportunity to see her dance the same roles frequently enough, you see the tinkering she does from one performance to another to try to improve). I think the changes she made in her Juliet this time miss the mark (e.g., she overplayed her transfixed response to Romeo’s kiss to the point that some audience members giggled, and she exaggerated her arm movements to display emotion much more than she needed to, making her portrayal look more out-of-control than frenzied), but these changes did not diminish the impact of her performance in the least.

For example, Ms. Vishneva executed MacMillan’s balcony scene with such extraordinary amplification of the choreography and emotional depth that a written review can never be sufficiently adequate. But a description of the Met audience's response to it may provide a hint of the quality of Ms. Vishneva's performance (as well as that of her Romeo, Marcelo Gomes), and of the impact it had.

MacMillan's balcony scene provides as close a representation to the thrill of being in love, especially of being in love for the first time, that I can recall seeing anywhere. And this representation is so beautifully crafted that one would have to be made of stone not to be kinetically transported – and not only to the stage with the dancers, but to the recreated memory of the time when that particular viewer had experienced (or imagined) such overwhelming emotional force. It is not simply a voyeuristic or even vicarious experience; for a few moments, thanks to MacMillan's emotionally explosive choreography, it is a real adrenaline rush. While the scene unfolds, the audience is too involved to move, and the only sound heard is an occasional gasp of wonder at the intensity of the emotional display. But at its conclusion, it is not only the joy of having witnessed a great performance that prompts the audience’s ovation; it is each viewer's individual (and collective) emotional release. It happens every time. [Even on film – as I recall, the audience in the theater where I first watched “The Turning Point” broke into applause as the ‘balcony scene’ performed by Leslie Browne and Mikhail Baryshnikov ended.] But this volcanic release doesn’t usually begin until the scene is about to end - as Juliet and Romeo are straining to reach one another from her position on the balcony to his on the stage below. For Ms. Vishneva and Mr. Gomes, the audience's collective release could not be restrained. The thunderous ovation began while Ms. Vishneva and Mr. Gomes were still on the stage floor wrapped in each others’ arms, and it overwhelmed the orchestra to the point where it was impossible to hear any music as Ms. Vishneva raced back up the steps to her balcony. It was an extraordinary experience to witness from the audience, and must have been equally extraordinary for Ms. Vishneva and Mr. Gomes to hear from the stage. And it is an experience that this viewer joined in, and will not soon forget.

This performance’s Mercutio was Craig Salstein (who had also performed the role at the July 7 matinee performance). Mr. Salstein succeeded in doing what I thought no one could do – which was to make me believe that another dancer could portray Mercutio with as much flourish as Mr. Cornejo (who danced the role at Ms. Kent’s performance). Although he consistently seemed to be a heartbeat ahead of the music, Mr. Salstein’s portrayal was great fun to watch. And Freddie Franklin’s Friar Laurence was performed with his usual humanity and grace (although it would be a welcome change if Mr. Franklin actually opened Juliet’s letter to Romeo before pretending to read it).

From Hee Seo’s first appearance at the Met with ABT, it was readily apparent that she was a particularly capable and engaging dancer. Last season, in reviewing her “La Sylphide,” I described her performance as ‘deliciously appealing,’ but noted that nuance and subtlety would develop over time. I missed her debut as Juliet last year – but if her performance in the role at that time required any further development, it does not any longer. She gave a remarkable performance.

Ms. Seo’s Juliet was different. Of course the steps and emotional development were the same, and of course Juliet is supposed to be an unusually wiilful young girl. But Ms. Seo gave Juliet's character a visually-conveyed determination that to this viewer was not only unlike the usual portrayal, but better. In her opening scene, Ms. Seo’s Juliet wasn’t just surprised or apprehensive about her developing body – her Juliet relished the fact that she was maturing, and she appeared to recognize, without regret, that she shouldn't be playing with dolls anymore. Ms. Seo's Juliet knew that she had more exciting things to look forward to.

And this emphasis on Juliet's willfulness and determination continued throughout the performance. Ms. Seo’s Juliet was not a creature of fate – she created her fate. For example, her edge-of-the-bed scene in Act III was thrillingly executed. Although she bowed her head a bit while sitting on the bed (as opposed to looking straight ahead throughout the scene), she raised her head back and resumed looking forward with sufficient time remaining in the scene to allow the developing thought that Friar Laurence could get her out of her dilemma to be fully and clearly expressed in her eyes alone. And after her initial unwillingness to take the potion that Friar Laurence offers her, Ms. Seo’s Juliet, after prayer and thought, doesn’t just reluctantly agree to take the potion – she emphatically decides she is going to do it, and she demands that Friar Laurence give the vial back to her.

But Ms. Seo’s Juliet was not just an unusually strong-willed girl - she also lovely to watch. Her Juliet was passionately in love with Romeo, but it was a passion tempered by lyricism: she wasn’t swept up by an emotional tsunami; she was swept away by more gentle ocean waves. Hers was a delightfully romantic Juliet. And I admit that her performance grabbed my heart from the first minute she was on stage – in part because she executed it so well, in part because I did not expect her to be as good as she was, and in part because she was the most natural of Juliets.

Cory Stearns was Ms. Seo’s ardent and attentive Romeo. As I’ve observed previously, Mr. Stearns is not yet a finished product – at times he comes across like a puppy or a boy scout. But there are some roles for which he seems perfectly suited temperamentally, and Romeo is one of them. He and Ms. Seo work together, and play off each other emotionally, very well.

All of the Tybalts (Gennadi Saveliev, Sascha Radetsky, Patrick Ogle, and Isaac Stappas) executed their roles admirably. Mr. Radetsky and Mr. Ogle’s characterizations came across as more ‘demented’ Tybalts; Mr. Stappas was more evil, and consequently, to me, more interesting to watch. [Mr. Saveliev, who I’ve seen perform Tybalt on many occasions, gave his usual wonderfully nasty portrayal.] Alexandre Hammoudi’s Paris was promising – although he was almost too nice a guy. Stella Abrera’s turn as one of the harlots was exaggerated perfectly, while Kristi Boone's lower-volume Lady Capulet came as a welcome relief from other high-pitched portrayals. And Vitali Krauchenka’s Lord Capulet was a pleasant surprise, if only because his portrayal appeared as fully developed as Victor Barbee’s, who has owned the role for many years (and who also appears to rule the stage – at one point, at the July 5 performance, I caught him giving stage directions to a few of Juliet’s friends).

And a nod to the corps. In this production, the townspeople are not simply window dressing. If one looks away from the main action to see what else is happening on stage, one finds performers actively engaged in supporting roles that few audience members get to see, but that are performed with as much professional integrity as are the roles performed by the leads and featured soloists. For example, at the June 5 performance, I observed Renata Pavam as she caught and fought over and successfully held onto the bouquet tossed by the ‘Mandolin Dance bride.’ It was a wonderful little vignette, and one that each of ABT's corps dancers does as a matter of routine by being in character every moment he or she is on stage.

Finally, as these were ABT’s last performances in New York for some time, a concluding word must be said about the state of the company as a whole. This viewer has frequently complained about the lack of performing opportunities in principal roles for soloists and corps dancers. With rare exception, the lead roles are danced by principals or guest artists – and I believe that somehow this deficiency needs to be remedied if ABT is to be more than the ballet equivalent of the New York Yankees. [On the other hand, I’m also the first to complain about ABT not providing sufficient opportunity for New York audiences to see international stars such as Alina Cojocaru more frequently.] But that having been said, it is also true that I know of no company that is able to present eight different Juliets in one week of performances, each of whom gives a thrilling, luminous portrayal, fully meriting the ovations she receives. [Although I missed the Juliets danced by Gillian Murphy, Irina Dvorovenko, and Paloma Herrera this season, I’ve seen Ms. Murphy and Ms. Dvorovenko dance the role previously, and know the great performances they give. I’ll catch up with Ms. Herrera’s Juliet down the road, but I don’t doubt that her Juliet is as compelling as the others.] ABT is home to an astonishing agglomeration of dancer/actors and actresses, and being able to witness night after night of outstanding performances to sold out houses is both a thrill and a privilege.


Last edited by balletomaniac on Wed Jul 14, 2010 7:42 am, edited 10 times in total.

Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Mon Jul 12, 2010 6:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 27, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 3377
Location: Canada
Hee Seo is to be promoted to the rank of Soloist with American Ballet Theatre. The
promotion, which becomes effective August 2010, was announced today by Artistic Director
Kevin McKenzie.
Born in Seoul, South Korea, Hee Seo began her ballet training in her hometown at the
Sun-hwa Arts Middle School. She was awarded a three-year full scholarship to continue her
training at the Universal Ballet Academy in Washington, D. C. In 2003, Seo won a scholarship
to train at the John Cranko Ballet Academy in Stuttgart. She is the recipient of the 2003 Prix de
Lausanne Award and the 2003 Grand Prix at the Youth American Grand Prix in New York.
Seo joined the ABT Studio Company (now ABT II) in 2004. She was named an
apprentice with the main Company in May 2005 and promoted to the corps de ballet in March
2006. Her repertoire with the Company includes Gamzatti in La Bayadère, Zulma in Giselle,
Natalia in On the Dnieper, Olympia in Lady of the Camellias, Juliet in Romeo and Juliet, the
Fairy of Sincerity and Princess Florine in The Sleeping Beauty, the pas de trois, the Polish
Princess and a big swan in Swan Lake, the Sylph in La Sylphide, Ceres in Sylvia and roles in
Ballo della Regina, Birthday Offering, The Brahms-Haydn Variations, Dark Elegies, From Here
On Out, The Leaves Are Fading, Overgrown Path and Seven Sonatas.
-30-


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Mon Jul 12, 2010 6:16 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 27, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 3377
Location: Canada
Final performances for American Ballet Theatre’s New York Summer Intensive
Program are scheduled for Friday, July 30, 2010 at 12 P.M. and 4 P.M. at Frank Sinatra School
of the Arts. The performances mark the conclusion of ABT’s 15th annual New York Summer
Intensive, a six-week training program for dancers ages 12 to 22.
In honor of the 30th anniversary of La Bayadère, Summer Intensive students will
perform excerpts from the ballet, including the “Kingdom of the Shades” scene. The Summer
Intensive final performances will also feature excerpts from Don Quixote, The Sleeping Beauty
and Raymonda, as well as original choreography by Aszure Barton, Leslie Browne, Olga
Dvorovenko, Joe Istre, Jessica Lang, Brian Reeder and Kanji Segawa.
Participants in American Ballet Theatre’s Summer Intensives are chosen through a
cross-country audition tour sponsored by Freed of London, Ltd. This year, more than 3,400
students auditioned in 21 cities across the United States. ABT’s 2010 Summer Intensives will
reach over 1100 participants in New York City and through satellite programs in Michigan,
Alabama, Texas and California.
260 students are currently participating in the 2010 New York Summer Intensive.
The annual program at ABT’s New York City studios is a comprehensive course that begins with
daily ballet technique class and includes specialized classes in pointe work, partnering,
choreography, jazz, character dance, modern dance, musical theater, Pilates and yoga for young
dancers. To complement the dancers’ training, lectures are offered on injury prevention,
nutrition, and dance history.
Under the direction of Melissa Allen Bowman, the 2010 New York Summer Intensive
Program incorporates a faculty of ABT alumni, members of ABT’s Artistic Staff and renowned
teachers, including Kevin McKenzie, Franco De Vita, Wes Chapman, Kate Lydon, Ethan Brown,
Leslie Browne, Hilary Cartwright, Harriet Clark, Olga Dvorovenko, Brian Reeder, Lupe Serrano,
Eleanor D’Antuono, David Howard, Johanna Butow and Rosanna Seravalli.
Scünci is the Official Hair Accessory of the ABT Summer Intensive.
Frank Sinatra School of the Arts is located at 35-12 35th Avenue in Astoria,
New York. For detailed directions, please visit http://www.franksinatraschoolofthearts.org.
Tickets are $16 for adults, $11 for children and students and will go on sale to the public on
Friday, July 30 at 11 A.M. in the theatre lobby.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Tue Jul 13, 2010 12:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12415
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Jocelyn Noveck reviews the Saturday, July 10 matinee performance of "Romeo and Juliet" with Natalia Osipova and David Hallberg for the Canadian Press.

Canadian Press


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Wed Jul 14, 2010 2:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Apr 30, 2006 5:02 pm
Posts: 1495
Location: USA-Switzerland
Thanks for the great, epic(!) reviews, balletomaniac.

I'm glad that you got to see so many outstanding performances.

Maybe you've got 'good vibes' or something. My feeling is that any of these artists, at this level, are capable of giving a spectacular performance. You apparently saw a complete string of them and this is wonderful for you, the entire audience and the artists.

I would really have liked to have heard about Gillian Murphy. She has most amazed me with her ability to even surpass her remarkable technical prowess with some incredibly expressive performances, possibly the best I've ever seen, along with Veronika Part and an unbelievable 'out-there-somewhere' "Giselle" by Irina Dvorovenko.

I go to the ballet hoping for an almost transcending experience and it looks like you may have had this happen day after day. Wonderful !


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Wed Jul 14, 2010 4:55 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 27, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 3377
Location: Canada
AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE SOLOISTS
YURIKO KAJIYA AND JARED MATTHEWS
TO APPEAR ON “SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE”
THURSDAY, JULY 22 AT 9:00 PM EST/8:00 PM CST


American Ballet Theatre Soloists Yuriko Kajiya and Jared Matthews are scheduled to perform on Fox TV’s “So You Think You Can Dance” on Thursday, July 22.
In a special guest appearance, Kajiya and Matthews will perform the Grand Pas de Deux from Act III of Don Quixote. The program will be broadcast live from CBS Television Studios in Hollywood, California, at 9:00 PM (EST) / 8:00 PM (CST).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Wed Jul 14, 2010 7:23 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2004 11:01 pm
Posts: 341
Location: New Jersey
Hope they have more luck getting screen time than Tiler Peck did on DWTS.

Buddy - I wish I had seen the the other three perfs also, but I discovered I had limits. I'm getting too old for two double-headers in a week. :) But having seen Gillian Murphy's Juliet last year, and Irina Dvorovenko's a few years ago, I agree with you.

Now I need a vacation.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 2010 12:38 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 12415
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Tobi Tobias reviews the last two weeks of the ABT season in ArtsJournal.

ArtsJournal


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 72 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group