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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Thu May 27, 2010 2:04 pm 
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In the New York Post, Leigh Witchel reviews the Tuesday, May 25 performance of "Lady of the Camellias."

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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 10:24 am 
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American Ballet Theatre
Metropolitan Opera House
Lincoln Center
New York, New York

May 26, 2010 (evening)
Lady of the Camellias

There are many reasons to enjoy John Neumeier’s “Lady of the Camellias,” and, based on the audience response at the May 26 performance, American Ballet theatre has a new hit production. But although “Lady of the Camellias” is a ballet love story, it doesn’t have the kind of explosive choreography that balletgoers are accustomed to seeing in ballet love stories. Rather, the strength of “Lady of the Camellias” is in its simplicity (although it presents a complex interweaving of time and space), its poetry, and its intimacy – and in its requirement that its audiences think as well as feel.

But what makes “Lady of the Camellias” as good a work of theater as it is, and as audience-pleasing as it is, is the opportunity it provides for its two lead characters, and particularly for its ballerina, to dominate the stage from beginning to end, and in the process to act up a storm without relying on extraneous thunder and lightning for support. And at the May 26th performance, Irina Dvorovenko did just that.

Irina Dvorovenko is one of ABT’s least celebrated, but most accomplished dancers. She may not get the hype of certain others, but she deserves to. I have never found her to give a performance that was less than stellar. But, for Ms. Dvorovenko, “Lady of the Camellias” was more than just another stellar performance; it was a tour de force, and a personal triumph. Ms. Dvorovenko dances in a sort of understated manner – without pyrotechnics, but with such effortless grace that you don’t realize you’re watching a great performance until the piece is nearly over and you realize she’s captured your heart. But she previously had not (at least to me) displayed a particularly powerful, dominating personality on stage. She did in this production, but it was a power tempered by subtlety and a dominance clothed in delicacy, shades of character personality that perfectly matched the choreography.

Since 1973, John Neumeier has been the Director and Chief Choreographer of the Hamburg Ballet and its ‘Ballettintendant’ (a position that includes general manager, artistic director, chief choreographer and director of the school) since 1996. He choreographed “Lady of the Camellias” for the Stuttgart Ballet in 1978, and restaged it for the Hamburg Ballet in 1981. At both premieres, Marguerite was danced by Marcia Haydee, the Stuttgart’s ‘prima’ and a dancer of irresistible heart and soul, to whom Neumeier dedicated the ballet.

The story is familiar. It is based on the 1848 novel “La Dame aux Camellias” by Alexandre Dumas, fils, a source that has been mined many times before, including by Verdi in his 1853 opera “La Traviata,” in numerous film iterations of “Camille,” and in a 1963 one-act ballet by Sir Frederick Ashton, “Marguerite and Armand,” choreographed specifically for Margot Fonteyn and Rudolf Nureyev. Essentially, it is a combination love story/morality tale, with the focus on the former, but the latter being the undercurrent that propels the action.

The famous Parisian courtesan Marguerite Gautier (inspired by Dumas’s lover, Marie Duplessis) has died, and in a series of flashbacks, her lover Armand – the one of her lovers whom she loved back – recalls episodes from their relationship. These flashbacks themselves contain vision sequences and scenes within scenes, primarily relating Marguerite and Armand to the ‘fictional’ lovers Manon Lescaut, also a courtesan, and Manon’s lover Des Grieux, with Marguerite and Armand identifying with Manon and Des Grieux, and sensing that they are following the same path, with the same likely tragic outcomes. In the end (which is actually the beginning, the way the story is structured), Marguerite, despite (or perhaps because of) the control over men that her beauty, sophistication and free-spiritedness allow, dies alone.

Neumeier’s conceit is to interweave the Marguerite and Amand/Manon and Des Grieux stories through the interweaving of a ballet based on Manon into the ‘real-time’ story of Marguerite – a ballet within the ballet, in which the fourth wall breaks down completely, and the ‘real’ characters interact with the fictional ones. The technique (a show within a show) has been done many times before, but the effect here is a bit different – here the two sets of characters become parallel characters in the same work,

As Neumeier has conceived it, the ballet is more about love than about passion. This is not to say that there isn’t passion on stage – there is – but the focus is the love between Marguerite and Armand, which Neumeier depicts more with tenderness than with pyrotechnics: While having similar emotional intensity, it has a lower decibel level than, for example, Sir Kenneth MacMillan’s “Manon” This sensibility is particularly appropriate to the Chopin selections which Neumeier chose as the foundation for his choreography. Just as the Chopin music (most of which is only played by piano) is light and airy and refined, but also inherently passionate, so Neumeier’s “Lady of the Camellias” is lighter and more refined than other similarly themed romantic ballets. Indeed, it impressed me as being a “chamber ballet’ of sorts. Even though it occupies a full stage, it is essentially a series of consecutive dances for two, three, or four, occasionally interrupted by dances for larger ensembles. As a result, it looks and feels ‘smaller,’ and creates a remarkable ambiance of intimacy between the performers on stage and the audience. Indeed, just as the fourth wall between the Manon performance and the Marguerite/Armand audience breaks down physically due to the interaction between the two sets of lovers, the fourth wall between the Marguerite/Armand performance and the audience breaks down as well – not just because of an individual dancer’s performance, but because Neumeier has choreographed it that way (the action frequently crosses the proscenium to the edge of the stage, almost into the lap of the audience). And although the ballet proceeds linearly through the course of Marguerite and Armand’s relationship, the layering of visions and flashbacks provides a complex framework upon which the simple purity of the theme is presented. And as a result, the ballet breathes.

As for the choreography itself, I have previously found Neumeier’s work to often look forced and repetitive. I had the same observation occasionally in this piece, and at times found myself dwelling as much on the joys of Jerome Robbins’s choreography to Chopin as on the movement in front of me. But these episodes are minor and the more I see this work, the more I suspect that that I’ll ignore the temptation to think about other dances. In its most important part – the evolution and reflection in movement of the relationship between Marguerite and Armand – the choreography soars. By way of example, in the first act, the dancers’ port de bras appear to be visualizations of songs from the heart – the hands move forward from the chest and spread outward and upward as if to embrace the air. A little like Bournonville port de bras (but without the accompanying Bournonville emphatic buoyancy). The result is a sensation of openness and warmth that invites the audience in.

Aside from Ms. Dvorovenko, the cast at this performance was first rate. Armand has as much time on stage, and is as demanding in its way, as Marguerite. Cory Stearns, Ms. Dvorovenko’s Armand, has impressed me from the first time I saw him dance as having the personality of a boy scout, with an inherent innocence that may not permit him to assay characters requiring either noble bearing or sensual aggressiveness. And his characterization here scared me at first – as if it might morph into an episode of Cougar Town (albeit a bit more sophisticated). He looked so young, so inexperienced; as if he were more Marguerite’s puppy dog than potential suitor/conquest. But Mr. Stearns has a heart, which he wears on his sleeve – and in that respect he is perfectly suited for the role of Armand. And although his range still seems a bit limited, he was able to mature from a young boy to a young man as the evening progressed. But there is nothing limited about Mr. Stearns’s abilities as a partner: as always, his partnering here of Ms. Dvorovenko was never less than superb.

As Armand’s Father, Vitali Krauchenka was a pleasant surprise. Although the character doesn’t have much, physically, to do, it is central to the piece, as it is his displeasure with the notion of his son cavorting with a prostitute that moves the story along. But his portrayal included a quiet dignity and sensitivity that I did not expect, and he turned what could have been a cardboard character into a man who cared deeply about his son, but could also feel the pain of others. Luciana Paris and Melanie Hamrick played courtesan friends/rivals of Marguerite with frivolity and zest, and Gennadi Savelliev as Gaston Rieux, Marguerite and Armand’s mutual friend who first introduces the love-struck boy to the most desirable courtesan in Paris, delivered a performance of refined frivolity. And as Nanina, Marguerite’s maid, Christine Shevchenko, converted what could have been a wooden role into one that was compassionate and human.

"Lady of the Camellias" will be given additional performances next week. In my mind's eye, I can see each of the lead ballerinas giving memorable performances. If the sensation of drinking champagne while brushing away tears is appealing, see it.


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 2:05 pm 
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Thank you so much for the first hand account. I am glad to hear from someone for whom the production works as intended.


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 2:50 pm 
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Apollinaire Scherr reviews "Lady of the Camellias" in the Financial Times.

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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 3:49 pm 
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Robert Johnson writes admiringly of "Lady of the Camellias" in the New Jersey Star-Ledger.

NJ Star-Ledger


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 7:23 pm 
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Thanks, Francis.

Were the other reviews negative? I haven't read any of them yet - or reviews of anything else this season. Maybe I'll catch up sometime over the weekend.


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Sat May 29, 2010 11:21 am 
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I think Robert Johnson in the New Jersey Star-Ledger hits the mark when he says that there is nothing else like it in the ABT repertoire. (His review is positive.) I think it's fair to observe that several of the other press reviews trend negative.


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Wed Jun 02, 2010 1:00 am 
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Claudia La Rocco reviews the Friday, May 28 performance of "Don Quixote" in the New York Times.

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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Wed Jun 02, 2010 1:45 pm 
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Deborah Jowitt reviews "Lady of the Camellias" in the Village Voice.

Village Voice

Robert Greskovic reviews "Lady of the Camellias" in the Wall Street Journal.

Wall Street Journal


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Thu Jun 03, 2010 2:04 pm 
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In the New York Times, Gia Kourlas interviews Alicia Alonzo prior to the June 3, 2010 gala performance in her honor.

NY Times


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Fri Jun 04, 2010 1:38 pm 
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Susan Reiter reports on the June 3 performance of "Don Quixote" performed in honor of Alicia Alonzo in the Los Angeles Times.

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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Fri Jun 04, 2010 11:04 pm 
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American Ballet Theatre - update

"Lady of the Camellias" Redux

I know I'm jumping ahead -- I haven't done the Don Q's yet (including last night's tribute to Alicia Alonzo). But the Don Qs for the season are done. There are still a few more performances of "Lady of the Camellias." If anyone happens to see this, and is interested in seeing one of those performance-of-a-lifetime that Diana Vishneva seems to give every time she walks on stage, get tickets to this Monday's performance.

My second viewing of "Lady of the Camellias" only reinforced my earlier positive reaction to it; it looked even better to me the second time around. But a good part of that reaction was the cast. As good as anyone else may be in the role, Diana Vishneva is a world apart. There simply is no other dancer currently performing that I'm aware of who can both act and dance as extraordinarily as she can. Marcelo Gomes, in this writer's opinion, is without peer as a dancer, actor, and partner. And, as Marguerite and Armand, the two of them together are even better than they are individually. They pay attention to each other, play off each other, and make each other look even better than they already are. It was a performance that was a privilege to see. And that is an understatement. And with a scintillating Veronica Part as Manon, the evening was one for the ages.

If I have an opportunity, I'll expand on this. But for now, according to the most recent performance schedule, this same cast is scheduled to perform "Lady of the Camellias" again on Monday night. I can't believe that Ms. Vishneve can string together two brilliant performances of a piece where's she's almost constantly on stage in as emotionally and physically taxing a role as this with only two days rest; but, having seen Ms. Vishneva as often as I have, I can't believe that she wouldn't. She's that good, and that consistent. So, if you happen to be flying between, say, San Diego and San Francisco, or Washington State and Washington D.C., or any points in between, take a slight detour and see Monday night's performance. It's worth it.


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 2:58 pm 
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In the New York Times, Alastair Macaulay reviews Natalia Osipova's performance in "Don Quixote."

NY Times


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2010 4:58 pm 
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American Ballet Theatre
Metropolitan Opera House
Lincoln Center,
New York, New York

June 1, 2(e), 3 (Alicia Alonso Tribute)
Don Quixote


I saw Alicia Alonso dance an excerpt from “Giselle” with American Ballet Theatre some 20 years ago. By that time, she was already long past her prime. But, from the still brilliantly-executed entrechats-quatre from Act II of “Giselle,” which I since learned were her signature, I could see how great a ballerina she once was, and how legendary a star she still was then. Some call her the best Giselle ever – for me, it is sufficient to know that others think so.

On the occasion of her 90th birthday (or, more accurately, her 90th birthday year), ABT paid tribute to Ms. Alonso by presenting a gala performance of “Don Quixote” featuring three different sets of dancers portraying Kitri and Basilio in each of the three acts of the ballet. Preceded by a video of Ms. Alonso discussing her performing history, which included excerpts from Ms. Alonso’s performances from childhood through her many professional triumphs, the evening was a glittering tribute, celebrated before a house that was packed to the gills.

The three sets of dancers were, in order, Paloma Herrera and Marcelo Gomes, Xiomara Reyes and Herman Cornejo, and Natalia Osipova and Jose Manuel Carreno. All danced admirably, but none (with the possible exceptions of Mr. Gomes and Ms. Osipova), as well as they do when they have an opportunity to dance their roles from beginning to end. I will comment more on these keyhole performances later. But as a gala, it was appropriately festive and different.

Both of the two ‘full’ performances of Don Q that I saw this week were, for the most part, brilliantly danced, albeit with significant differences in delivery. But, except for Natalia Osipova, who overwhelms whatever piece she’s in and every other performer in it, the primary focus is the disappointing production.

“Don Quixote” was staged for ABT for the first time by Mikhail Baryshnikov. It premiered in 1978, the springtime of what I have previously described as American ballet’s ‘Golden Age.’ The hype surrounding it was extraordinary: News articles trumpeted the arrival of this new major production (as well as the physical toll it was taking on its ballerinas). Time magazine had a picture of Gelsey Kirkland, the production’s first Kitri, frozen in mid-‘Plisetskaya Leap’ on its cover [its cover!] with the headline: “U.S. Ballet Soars.”

And the production was every bit as good as the hype. There was so much going on – I recall thinking that it was a sort of three-ring-circus of a production – that on initial viewing it was difficult to maintain focus. It was funny and thrilling and its action was non-stop, and it completely dispelled the notion that ballet was elitist, or that one couldn’t laugh and gasp and get completely swept away all at the same time at one ballet performance. The choreography was turned down a notch in subsequent seasons, which caused a certain loss in exuberance, to my viewing, but this production was still exciting to watch, with few, if any, stops in the action.

After Baryshnikov and ABT parted ways, the Baryshnikov production was no longer performed. For a time, ABT used a production staged by the Bolshoi’s Vladimir Vasilev. I don’t recall the lead dancers I saw, but, as a whole, the production was like watching paint dry. The staging by Kevin McKenzie and Susan Jones that succeeded it in 1995 was an improvement, but it still moved too slowly. And although there appears to have been some tinkering with it since I last saw it in 2005, what changes have been made don’t help. [For example, the Dryad Queen is now danced by the same dancer as Mercedes, as was the case in Baryshnikov’s version (my 2005 review for BDM noted separate dancers for those two roles); and there seems to have been a completely forgettable dance for Mercedes and Espada and their hangers-on inserted at the beginning of Act III (but perhaps I just ignored it in 2005).] And it all comes to a grinding halt in Act III: What is supposed to be a wedding celebration is dead air punctuated by the Don Q pas de deux. You could hear the audience squirming while they waited for the next dancer to begin the next bravura display.

All this having been said, and as much as it suffers in comparison with the Baryshnikov version, on its own it’s adequate. More importantly, like other versions of Don Q, it serves as a showcase for some extraordinary performances.

In the course of preparing this review, I looked back at previous observations of “Don Quixote” performances that I’d reduced to writing, and found that I’d seen Ms. Osipova before in Don Q – though not as Kitri. In a BDM review of the Boshoi’s July 8, 2005 performance of Don Q at the Met, I made the following observation: “But little Natalia Osipova and not so little Nelli Kobakhidze, both members of the corps, displayed precocious (and prodigious) talent in their respective variations during the Act III Grand Pas. Osipova in particular promised to be the baby ballerina starlet from the moment she appeared on stage, and she delivered on the promise. Of course, it’s too early to tell whether she can do more than what she showed in this variation, but her self-confidence and obvious ability (including leaps that came close to orbiting) herald a bright future.” [Now if I can only learn to be as prescient with other aspects of my life.]

Ms. Osipova’s bright future is now.

Natalia Osipova is now a magnificent, and significant, ballerina. And I’m convinced that she must be part gazelle. Last year, seeing her initial performance with ABT in “Giselle” (and having forgotten that I’d seen here four years earlier), I observed that she ‘floats like a petal borne by the breeze.’ But in “Don Q,” she doesn’t float. She flies. She not only appears to leap higher and split wider and spin faster than anyone else – she also gobbles the stage like a streamlined ms. pacman in toe shoes. It is simply astonishing to see someone who physically appears light as a feather move through space with the force and speed of a jet aircraft, but she does. And it’s all done effortlessly – no need for any windup; no need for any booster rocket; no need for any support.

And therein lies the problem I have with Ms. Osipova’s performance. She also has no need for a partner. It’s all about her, and what she can do by herself – awesome as ‘what Ms. Osipova can do by herself’ is. And, as with her “Giselle” last season, to this viewer she’s working too hard to be as great an actress as she is a dancer. Ms. Osipova was the complete Spanish spitfire – nothing less, but also not much more. It was as if the personality had been glued on, like the artificial curl that was shellacked onto her forehead. There isn’t anything wrong with this interpretation – indeed, it seems to be bred into Bolshoi productions. [In that same review I mentioned earlier, I had a similar difficulty with Svetlana Zakharova’s Kitri, in which I observed that her characterization seemed “pasted on.”] So Osipova’s characterization may well be perfectly-executed Bolshoi training. But regardless if its validity as a characterization, and whether it is a product of individual preference or Bolshoi style, it comes across, at least to this viewer, as if something vital isn’t there. That something is a quality that makes you want to love Kitri, as well as party with her.

Which brings me to Gillian Murphy’s performance on June 2. While not as dazzling as Ms. Osipova, her characterization was more ‘real.’ High-spirited without being domineering or dominating, Ms. Murphy’s Kitri was easier to like. And she interacted with her Basilio, Ethan Stiefel, as if they were a pair, rather than two individuals who happened to be dancing as partners. While it may be tempting to chalk this up to non-performance factors, it is a quality I’ve observed in the best of the Kitris that I’ve seen – regardless of whether there is a relationship other than what is displayed on stage.

Not surprisingly, Mr. Stiefel was thoroughly engaged as well, and he can still surprise the audience with his athleticism (in the middle of his tours a la seconde in the coda of the Act III pas de deux, for example, he jumped into the air with his supporting leg). But Ms. Osipova’s Basilio, Jose Manuel Carreno, was along for the ride. By that I don’t mean that he delivered a less than bravura performance – when he danced on his own, he was superb. But he received little to play off from Ms. Osipova, and consequently the emotional connection between his Basilio and Ms. Osipova’s Kitri was relatively nonexistent. Even in the Act II ‘suicide scene,’ other than when the choreography demanded thematic contact, they both seemed to be doing their own thing.

Daniil Simkin, who danced the Gypsy Boy on June 1 (as well as at the June 3 gala), is as gifted a performer, and as proficient at doing his own thing, as Ms. Osipova. He’s also an extraordinary athlete. Whatever he does, his performances leave the audience gasping in disbelief. Although he didn’t change the choreography, Mr. Siimkin’s Gypsy Boy on June 1 (as well as at the June 3 gala) took what was there to an extraordinary level – and the tricks (balletomaniac slang for ‘I-can’t-believe-I-just-saw him-do that) just kept on coming. For example, he appears to have created a ‘Siimkin Leap’ (he jumps up and stretches his head and legs backward until both his feet rise above the level of his head at the height of the jump), which he promptly trumped with a barrel-like turn in which his torso remained practically parallel to the floor while he whipped his body around, while in the air, with scissor kicks. Whether he will eventually become as competent a partner as he is a solo dancer remains to be seen. [My wife envisioned him partnering Ms. Osipova some day – but I doubt that any one stage would be sufficient to contain both of them dancing lead roles at the same time.]

At both performances, Amour was danced by Yuriko Kajiya (who also danced one of the Flower Girls at the gala on Thursday), and she delivered superb performances each time. Ms. Kajiya was as endearing and accomplished an Amour as I’ve seen. As Espada, Gennadi Saveliev gave his usual strong performance. But Tuesday’s Espada, Jared Matthews (who repeated the role during Thursday’s gala) was an unfortunate choice. Mr. Matthews was unable to convey the swagger, or pseudo-swagger, that is essential to the role, and was not only eclipsed by each of his Mercedes partners, he was also overshadowed by some of his own ‘toreador companions.’

The dancers portraying Mercedes/the Dryad Queen at the June 1 and 2 performances, Kristi Boone and Stella Abrera, were both excellent. Each danced a commanding and spirited Mercedes. And as the Flower Girls, Renata Pavam and Isabella Boylston on Tuesday, Sarah Lane (who also danced a significantly improved Amour for the gala performance) and Simone Messmer on Wednesday, and Ms. Kajiya and Misty Copeland on Thursday, all performed with clarity and vivacity. But the three Gamaches, while not exactly Moe, Larry or Curly, were danced as clumsy idiots rather than hopelessly inept fops – it would have been better the other way around.

As I indicated earlier, the lead dancers for Thursday’s gala tribute danced only one act, and their characterizations were limited and incomplete.

One would have expected Ms. Herrera, the night’s initial Kitri, to have pulled out all stops since she had no need to conserve her strength. But her performance, though certainly more than adequate, came across as somewhat detached. But her Act I partner, Mr. Gomes, is thoroughly engaged in whatever he does, as he was on Thursday. Mr. Gomes throws away more ‘lines’ than other dancers create in an entire performance. Ms. Reyes and Mr. Cornejo were both fine in Act II, but out-of-context it is difficult to extrapolate what their full performances would have shown. Ms. Osipova danced the Act III pas de deux as if it been a stand-alone excerpt within a larger program – which essentially is what it was – with her usual intensity, though I would have preferred the pas de cheval of the ‘fan dance’ to the relatively unimpressive turns that she substituted, as she had done on Tuesday. [This also may also be standard Bolshoi, since in the above-referenced 2005 Bolshoi performance Zakharova didn’t do the ‘fan dance’ either.] Mr. Carreno, looking somewhat fatigued compared to his performance on Tuesday, nevertheless energetically executed his solo variations

The most exciting performance of the evening, however, came from Ms. Part as Mercedes/the Dryad Queen. In the absence of continuous lead dancers, Ms. Part dominated the stage whenever she appeared, portraying Mercedes with such power and dramatic force (while maintaining essential movement fluidity) that whenever the choreography demanded expansive movement, she seemed to thrust herself off the floor.

Doubtless, had she been able to see, Ms. Alonso would have thoroughly enjoyed the evening’s performances – in particular her fellow Cubans, Ms. Reyes and Mr. Carreno, and Ms. Part’s dramatic Mercedes. But I suspect, as absorbed in dance as she still is, that she was able to see each of the performances in her mind even if she couldn’t see them in front of her. And, as Mr. Carreno and Kevin McKenzie led her on stage following the full cast bows, the tribute concluded with Ms. Alonso receiving yet another emotion-filled standing ovation.


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre - 2010 Met Season
PostPosted: Tue Jun 08, 2010 3:03 pm 
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ROBERTO BOLLE TO WITHDRAW FROM PERFORMANCES WITH

AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE DUE TO INJURY


Due to injury, Principal Dancer Roberto Bolle will not perform previously scheduled performances of Swan Lake on Monday, June 21 and Romeo and Juliet on Thursday, July 8.

Marcelo Gomes will replace Bolle in Swan Lake dancing opposite Veronika Part as Odette/Odile on Monday, June 21. The performance of Romeo and Juliet on Thursday, July 8 will be danced by Paloma Herrera and Marcelo Gomes. Irina Dvorovenko and Cory Stearns will dance the title roles on Friday, July 9.


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