public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Sun Dec 21, 2014 2:09 pm

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2009 10:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 28, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 255
With all due respect, I have to disagree with Catherine on a number of points. First, it is presumptuous, at least, to suggest everyone who enjoyed SFB Swan Lake is an ignorant rube. Whatever criticisms we had, and most of us had some, on balance there was a lot to enjoy and I don't think I and others are dummies because we think so. Or should we just get DVDs of Kirov Swan Lake and watch that over and over but never see anyone else?

I also disagree with the main point that classics stand alone and unchanged. First, it's not factually true; before the printing press when books were hand copied, not only were there transcription errors, it was the norm for copiers to add and embellish - not considered dishonest back then. In fact, that's why we have the King James bible. The king got annoyed with so many versions and ordered the chief scholars and poets to put together a single version. How close it was to the original Hebrew and Aramaic is anyone's guess.

Leaving aside that ancient history, I would submit a book changes every time a person reads it. When I read Wuthering Heights, written after the invention of the printing press and in my native language, based on descriptions I visualized the scenery, the appearance and dress of the characers, their voices, their motives, etc. And every reader does the same. That is why to this day scholars debate, for example, what Shakesepeare's true message was in Merchant of Venice, fiercely, even though they all are reading the same play.

Reading is a private communion between writer and reader. But a performance, music, dance or theater, is public. And what we see is a director's interpretation of a work of art, filtered through the performers. It's a public version of what happens when we read a book. And making a film of a classic (some are crap but some, like the Russian War and Peace and the 1968 Romeo and Juliet are very good) is doing the same. The story doesn't change, but scenery, costumes, voices, emphasis all reflect a director's view.

I for one would have been disappointed had Tina LeBlanc and Lorena Feijoo danced Odette/Odile exactly alike. They are two different women, different physical attributes, from two countries. I would expect to see those differences. For every performance to be exactly alike, and exactly like Kirov/Bolshoi, would be boring indeed.

BTW, I do agree on the feather caps. But perhaps the mixture of costumes and scenery could have been making a point, that Swan Lake is essentially a dream, outside time and place?

On another point, it seems all of us saw either LeBlanc or Feijoo - anyone see the other casts? I'd be interested to hear some thoughts, especially on Sarah Van Patten, whom Rachel Howard, rather surprisingly, considered the best of the six.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2009 7:19 am 
fluteboo wrote:
I agree about the Rothbart costume. A really stupid decision not to change his dress for the black swan scene. I forgot to mention that Anthony Spaulding danced that role on Sunday, and it was good to see more dancing for the role. However, the choreography consisted primarily of the same leaps across the stage. Spaulding did offer a fabulous menace (and fabulous balloon).

As for the Act I costumes, contrary to Howard's review, I actually enjoyed the empire line dresses, how they flowed with the movements and provided a sense of continuity. Many of the men's coats had additional fabric to add an attractive swirling effect as well, so there seemed to be a consistent theme in that choice.

The lighting didn't seem problematic on Sunday afternoon. The rock in Act II seemed real, not plastic. Perhaps there had been some tweaking after opening night.

On the other hand, I found the large staircase set for Act III too pushed forward, so it appeared the dancers did not have enough room in the national folk dances to move easily during complicated passes or jumps. I noticed how each piece followed a czadas format, a slow movement followed by a fast one. Crandc is correct concerning the lack of a strong differentiation among these. On the other hand, I can't recall a Swan where the choreography distinguished Czadas from Russian folk dances, which are very different. It's usually the costumes that set the tone, "red and black and a fan are Spanish," etc: often caricatured and lacking authenticity. This production followed the usual model.

And yes, the Boitano arm was the one where he does the lutz with his arm held straight up in the air, a move that makes the rotations more difficult. Feijoo would do that about every third foutee, and also do a triple turn just to add to the thrill. Sorry for the lack of clarity--hadn't finished my coffee when I wrote that.

Overall, the problems in the production were minor and readily fixed.

Please please report on other pairings. I wish I could see each one. Comparisons may be unfair, in that the leads vary in style and temperament. I was unsure about Feijoo doing this role, and surprised to see I could appreciate her unique presentation. Really, apart from Sallie Wilson thrust unfairly into Odette-Odile in an ABT production in the early 1960s, I can't single out the many swans I've been fortunate to view. Is that why we return? (No one could match Sallie in ABT McMillans and similar ballets, but she just trembled as Swan Queen. I think it was her only performance.) So let's not have an Oscar contest. :wink:


coats had additional fabric to add an attractive swirling effect as well, so there seemed to be a consistent theme

_________________
rhinestone motif | clothing label


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2009 10:12 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 8:21 am
Posts: 72
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
neljeffz wrote:
fluteboo wrote:
..........Anthony Spaulding danced that role on Sunday, and it was good to see more dancing for the role. However, the choreography consisted primarily of the same leaps across the stage. Spaulding did offer a fabulous menace (and fabulous balloon).
...............And yes, the Boitano arm was the one where he does the lutz with his arm held straight up in the air, a move that makes the rotations more difficult. Feijoo would do that about every third foutee, and also do a triple turn just to add to the thrill. Sorry for the lack of clarity--hadn't finished my coffee when I wrote that.
:wink:


coats had additional fabric to add an attractive swirling effect as well, so there seemed to be a consistent theme

_________________
rhinestone motif | clothing label


I am curious about this discussion. Especially of the "menace' and the "balloon", both of which the quoted author found fabulous. I assume that neljeffz agreed, that's why he quoted fluteboo. But what are we talking about?--- ballet steps, 'themes' of costumes, or ice-skating arm moves?


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group