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 Post subject: Re: Ashton Centenary Celebration (Lincoln Center Festival 20
PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2004 3:31 am 
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From the New York Times,

Quote:
The Royal Ballet Returns, Looking Very International
New York Times - Jul 14 9:41 PM
The Royal Ballet opened the second week of the Lincoln Center Festival's superb tribute to Frederick Ashton on Tuesday with an ingeniously mixed bill.
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Not Quite Ashton's Fairy Land? If the Shoe Fits . . . .

By ANNA KISSELGOFF
The New York Times
July 20, 2004

There was a time when the Ashton "Cinderella" was the most glorious version of Prokofiev's ballet score. Nowadays the Royal dances it unevenly, with a gap in technique between the soloists and the principals.
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<small>[ 02 August 2004, 04:37 PM: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Ashton Centenary Celebration (Lincoln Center Festival 20
PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2004 3:55 am 
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Quote:
Cinderella Is Perfect Role for Cojocaru

ASSOCIATED PRESS
July 19, 2004

Cojocaru, who just turned 23, has had a meteoric rise, becoming a principal dancer just two years after joining the Royal Ballet in 1999. In that short time, she's developed a reputation as ''the next big thing'' in ballet.
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 Post subject: Re: Ashton Centenary Celebration (Lincoln Center Festival 20
PostPosted: Sun Jul 25, 2004 9:50 pm 
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Quote:
The Tender Touch

By DEBORAH JOWITT
The Village Voice
July 13, 2004

"And they were all sweet and kind and English," Gertrude Stein observed in 1937 of the characters Frederick Ashton concocted for A Wedding Bouquet — a ballet accompanied by spoken phrases drawn from her work.
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 Post subject: Re: Ashton Centenary Celebration (Lincoln Center Festival 20
PostPosted: Thu Jul 29, 2004 3:44 am 
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Quote:
Perennial Beauties and Fresh Tracks

By DEBORAH JOWITT
The Village Voice
July 26, 2004

Frederick Ashton's 1948 Cinderella makes no pretense of heavy drama; it's a fragrant fairy tale with beautiful choreography that says "happily ever after" from the moment it begins.
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 Post subject: Re: Ashton Centenary Celebration (Lincoln Center Festival 20
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2004 5:41 am 
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A Rare Orgy of Ashton Lets Us Share the Love
by Robert Gottlieb for The NY Observer

The recent two-week Frederick Ashton celebration at the Met, in honor of his 100th birthday, has been thrilling, moving, illuminating, yet in some ways disappointing. We in America have been on a thin diet of Ashton for many years (even his own company, the Royal Ballet, has been on strict rations). Granted that dancing Ashton requires a certain specific training, there’s still no good reason why companies around the world, so desperate for distinguished repertory, should shy away from the work of the man who is almost universally regarded as the second (with Balanchine) of the 20th century’s two greatest choreographers.

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 Post subject: Re: Ashton Centenary Celebration (Lincoln Center Festival 20
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2004 5:43 am 
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Britishisms
At Lincoln Center’s Ashton Festival, a second-ranked company steals the show. By Laura Shapiro for The New York Metro.

This summer’s Lincoln Center Festival kicked off with a glorious mini-festival honoring the centenary of Frederick Ashton, the choreographer who gave British ballet, well, its Britishness. An exact contemporary of Balanchine’s, Ashton kept faith with classical tradition just the way Balanchine did: by steeping himself in it even while he was transposing it to a new key. The artists’ most characteristic works are very different—Balanchine’s angular, slashing, high-speed choreography is worlds away from Ashton’s refinement, dignity, and love of portraiture—but together these two visionaries spent the twentieth century hoisting ballet from the past to the future.

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 Post subject: Re: Ashton Centenary Celebration (Lincoln Center Festival 20
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2004 5:48 am 
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Catching up on Tobi Tobias reviewing the Ashton Celebration. A labour of love:

ASHTON CELEBRATION #6
By Tobi Tobias for Arts Journal

The Royal Ballet concluded the Lincoln Center Festival’s Ashton Celebration—an event that demands an encore—by offering irresistible entertainment: three performances of the choreographer’s 1948 Cinderella, set to Prokofiev’s evocative score. The first of them, featuring Alina Cojocaru in the title role, was one of the most intense (and innocent) experiences I’ve had in a lifetime of ballet-going. This ballet is like a perfect children’s book: simple in its means; fluid in imagination; rich in delights that appeal to the eye and echo in the heart; charged with incontrovertible morality.

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ASHTON CELEBRATION #5
By Tobi Tobias for Arts Journal

The centerpiece of the Royal Ballet’s mixed repertory program for the Ashton Celebration was a quartet of pas de deux presented back to back on a bare stage. The content varied just a little from one evening to the next and the casting varied a lot, so that a goodly number of the company’s principals had an opportunity to win New York’s hearts and minds.

Programming clusters of brief dances—pièces d’occasion that have survived their original occasion and excerpts plucked from more ample contexts—is a time-honored way of attracting the general public to the ballet and pleasing fans who are more fascinated by star performers than they are by choreography.

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ASHTON CELEBRATION #4
By Tobi Tobias for Arts Journal

Q: What do Anna Pavlova, Isadora Duncan, Marius Petipa, and Euclid have in common? A: Serving Frederick Ashton as his muse. True, the geometrician of ancient Greece was not as frequent an inspiration to the man who essentially invented English ballet style as were the dance icons in this group. Nevertheless, he reigned over the abstract Scènes de ballet, choreographed in 1947, with which the Royal Ballet has just opened its week-long run at the Metropolitan Opera House.

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ASHTON CELEBRATION #3
By Tobi Tobias for Arts Journal

The first week of the Lincoln Center Festival’s Ashton Celebration brought the Joffrey Ballet of Chicago back to New York after a 10-year absence. The company, which used to be resident here, was very welcome. In the old days, even when you weren’t feeling much admiration for it, you often still felt affection for the engaging personalities of its dancers and the troupe’s overall feisty spirit. To be sure, purists in the audience back then would complain about the Joffrey’s imperfect classical technique and the many pop numbers in its repertory (a majority of them by the company’s present artistic director, Gerald Arpino), but they were the first to be grateful for the late Robert Joffrey’s reaching out to choreographers outside the classical domain, such as Twyla Tharp and Laura Dean....

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ASHTON CELEBRATION #2
By Tobi Tobias for Arts Journal

The second night of the Ashton Celebration featured two dances, both Birmingham Royal Ballet productions, in which the choreographer operated in his free-flowing “barefoot” vein, presumably with Isadora Duncan as his muse. The legendary primogenitor of modern dance was surely past her prime when the 17-year-old Ashton witnessed a handful of her performances in London, but she nevertheless made a tremendous and lasting impression on him—through her musicality, her sense of plastique, her voluptuous weighted quality, her resonance in stillness, and the sheer charismatic force of her conviction.

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<small>[ 02 August 2004, 07:49 AM: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


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