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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2007 12:57 pm 
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More about youth in New York Magazine - but this was obviously more recent because the only dancer mention is Robbie Fairchild (nice photo too). A bit of an odd article because NYCB's always been a company where young dancers have been cast in big roles - back to the days of Suzanne Farrell. It's not just in the last few years and it hasn't always worked out...

Quote:
A Very Young Dancer
Is City Ballet’s youth movement a danger or a delight?

By Rebecca Milzoff

When Robert Fairchild dances next Tuesday in New York City Ballet’s new Romeo & Juliet, audience members will notice several things about his Romeo. He’s poised, understatedly lyrical. He’s an incredibly sure partner, but with a light touch: Even alongside far more seasoned performers (like his sister Megan, a principal he guides through intricate lifts in Intermezzo), he exudes calm. He also looks uncannily age-appropriate for the part, because he’s only 19. The casting may seem unusual—barely two years out of the School of American Ballet, the Salt Lake City native is leading a full production—but in fact it is part of a gathering trend. In the past couple of years, Peter Martins has been actively promoting young soloists and standout corps de ballet members, frequently giving them billing next to the company’s more established stars.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2007 1:00 pm 
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Damian Woetzel is interviewed about Christopher Wheeldon and Woetzel's new job at the Vail Dance Festival

http://www.summitdaily.com/article/20070423/AE/70423002


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2007 4:41 pm 
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That is a curious article, Kate. Thanks for posting it. Odd how the student dancers merit no mention now, and it has become all about Fairchild's ascension.

at the same time, though -- "rude good health" -- what a delicious phrase from the article's writer!


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2007 1:47 am 
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A new season and a new NY Times head dance critic:

Quote:
A New Season Begins With a Celebration of a Master

By ALASTAIR MACAULAY
Published: April 26, 2007

Monday will be the 24th anniversary of the death of George Balanchine. For many dancegoers, the ending of a career so bountiful seemed the worst calamity to have befallen the art form since the death of Diaghilev in 1929. But far more Balanchine ballets are performed today than during his lifetime, by companies from San Francisco to St. Petersburg. Meanwhile, New York City Ballet preserves the main corpus of his choreography, while the School of American Ballet guards the flame of his academic teaching.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2007 8:09 am 
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LOVE Macauleys's writing. You can really see, hear and feel what he's describing. His love of the art is palpable and I like how he presents his opinions.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2007 2:58 pm 
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No more R& J debuts, so the SAB students seem to be out of the picture...


NEW YORK CITY BALLET
PRINCIPAL CASTING MAY 8 - 13, 2007 3rd WEEK
*Debut, **Guest, ++NYCB Apprentice, †SAB Faculty Member, ††SAB Guest Faculty Member
TUES., May 8, 2007 at 7:30 pm [BRISKIN]**

Romeo + Juliet:
Juliet:
Tybalt:
Lady Capulet:
Lord Capulet:
Juliet's Nurse:
Paris: HYLTIN
DE LUZ
KISTLER†
SOTO†**
PAZCOGUIN
J. STAFFORD†† Romeo:
Mercutio:
Benvolio:
Friar Laurence:
Prince of Verona: R. FAIRCHILD
ULBRICHT
CARMENA
la COUR
EVANS††
WED., May 9, 2007 at 7:30 pm [KAPLOW]

Romeo + Juliet:
Juliet:
Tybalt:
Lady Capulet:
Lord Capulet:
Juliet's Nurse:
Paris: MORGAN
T. ANGLE
KISTLER†
SOTO†**
MULLER
TWORZYANSKI Romeo:
Mercutio:
Benvolio:
Friar Laurence:
Prince of Verona: ORZA
HENDRICKSON
DANCHIG-WARING
la COUR
EVANS††
THUR., May 10, 2007 at 8 pm [BRISKIN]**

Romeo + Juliet:
Juliet:
Tybalt:
Lady Capulet:
Lord Capulet:
Juliet's Nurse:
Paris: T. PECK
RAMASAR
KISTLER†
SOTO†**
ABERGEL
DANCHIG-WARING Romeo:
Mercutio:
Benvolio:
Friar Laurence:
Prince of Verona: SUOZZI
VEYETTE
LAURENT
la COUR
EVANS††
FRI., May 11, 2007 at 8 pm [KAPLOW]

Romeo + Juliet:
Juliet:
Tybalt:
Lady Capulet:
Lord Capulet:
Juliet's Nurse:
Paris: HYLTIN
DE LUZ
KISTLER†
SOTO†**
MULLER
J. STAFFORD†† Romeo:
Mercutio:
Benvolio:
Friar Laurence:
Prince of Verona: R. FAIRCHILD
ULBRICHT
CARMENA
la COUR
EVANS††
SAT., May 12, 2007 at 2 pm [BRISKIN]**
Romeo + Juliet:
Juliet:
Tybalt:
Lady Capulet:
Lord Capulet:
Juliet's Nurse:
Paris: PEREIRA++
HALL
KISTLER†
SOTO†**
ABERGEL
J. STAFFORD†† Romeo:
Mercutio:
Benvolio:
Friar Laurence:
Prince of Verona: PEIFFER
ULBRICHT
CARMENA
la COUR
EVANS††
SAT., May 12, 2007 at 8 pm [BRISKIN]**

Romeo + Juliet:
Juliet:
Tybalt:
Lady Capulet:
Lord Capulet:
Juliet's Nurse:
Paris: T. PECK
RAMASAR
KISTLER†
SOTO†**
HANKES
DANCHIG-WARING Romeo:
Mercutio:
Benvolio:
Friar Laurence:
Prince of Verona: SUOZZI
VEYETTE
LAURENT
la COUR
EVANS††
SUN., May 13, 2007 at 3 pm [KAPLOW]
Romeo + Juliet:
Juliet:
Tybalt:
Lady Capulet:
Lord Capulet:
Juliet's Nurse:
Paris: HYLTIN
DE LUZ
KISTLER†
SOTO†**
PAZCOGUIN
J. STAFFORD†† Romeo:
Mercutio:
Benvolio:
Friar Laurence:
Prince of Verona: R. FAIRCHILD
ULBRICHT
CARMENA
HUBBE†
EVANS††
Current as of...April 26, 5 pm


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2007 1:54 am 
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Macaulay is so refreshing!! Why couldn't we have had him when Kisselgoff retired instead of a painful few years with Rockwell.

These reviews are insightful, honest and unbiased, and he's able to point out what doesn't work without being all doom and gloom. And gasp... he's even not afraid to be un-positive about Darci Kistler, who has been left untouched by recent reviewers for reasons that are pretty obvious. Feathers are gonna be ruffled :o)

Quote:
Lively Currents From Balanchine’s River of Ballets
By ALASTAIR MACAULAY
Published: April 27, 2007

Balanchine is a lost man, Lincoln Kirstein said around the end of 1939, only he said it in French: “Balanchine — c’est un homme perdu.”

George Balanchine, the genius choreographer whom Kirstein had brought to America, was then immersing himself so fully in the musicals of Broadway and Hollywood that there seemed to be no extricating him. Something happened in the next year or two to bring Balanchine around, though; about 1941, he was saying to the critic Edwin Denby, “We must save ballet.” When Denby replied, “But the dance is eternal,” Balanchine answered, “I don’t mean the dance. I mean ballet.”


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2007 2:55 am 
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/29/arts/ ... 9sulc.html

The 'whole' story of "Romeo and Juliet" comes out in a NY Times 'making of' article. It sounds like the reasons for Ms. Bachman not dancing are mostly injury - repeated knee problems - further complicated by issues with partnering. In addition, one student IS dancing, only she's now an apprentice - Erica Pereira. According to the article the company members didn't come into the picture for sure until last month or just before, so it does sound like Martins was holding out as long as possible.

Not a bad article, if only to get the 'schmooze' on what has happened. I strongly suspect it was written in response to all the comments about the students not appearing and, though it may well not tell the whole story, I think it gives a cognizant and reasonable account for why only Ms. Pereira is the only (former) student still dancing.

Kate


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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 7:24 pm 
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I've been reviewing the posts about Martins's casting of R&J. Although Martins may have created a problem that could have been avoided, I think the larger issue, which some have alluded to, is Martins's overall concept of placing young, unproven dancers in the major R&J roles.
However it works out (obvously I'm not at tonight's opening, but I do expect to attend other performances), I think that in this instance it makes good sense. I dont' recall seeing the other Juliets who've been cast, but just imagining Tyler Peck doing Juliet makes me giddy. That doesn't mean that I think more established dancers can't do the role; obvously they can, and do it well. But the notion of a young, feisty, perhaps somewhat impulsive dancer portraying a young, feisty, impulsive character, rather than a more mature dancer acting the part, is, to me, welcome. More importantly (at least to me), it provides the opportunity to watch a dancer grow into the role. I wish that McKenzie would give his talented ABT soloists and corps dancers, and NewYork audiences, the same opportunity.


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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 2:38 am 
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Considering the near automatic dislike of Martins' choreography on other forums, the very positive reviews of opening night would seem a very good sign! I'll be interested to read the NY Times review...

Kate


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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 4:29 pm 
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A nice article on Erica Pereira, one of the Juliets, with a really lovely photo gallery and a video.

http://www.newsday.com/entertainment/ny ... ent-bigpix

Kate


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PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 10:22 pm 
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Just got back from tonight’s performance of R&J. Since I also hope to attend tomorrow’s performance (and others), I’ll save a full review until after that. But I wanted to get a quick nickel’s worth of a review out now, in case anyone out there is interested, and before I get polluted by any reviews of last night’s opening (none of which I’ve yet seen).

Sir Kenneth doesn’t have anything to worry about. His version is still the gold standard of Romeo and Juliet. But Martins’s conception, though uneven, is at times superb, and seeing the same scenes with the same music choreographed through different eyes can be a revelation. The piece doesn’t always work. The opening scene in particular was a mistake that I thought Martins would never be able to overcome, and the second scene was only slightly better. But it grew after that. Martins’s ballroom scene was a totally new interpretation (at least to me), which made both choreographic and thematic sense. And once I was able to ignore the set (which was your basic minimalist utilitarian low-budget moving wall that looks like Scandinavian modern design superimposed on a Renaissance-style façade) and appreciate that Martins was doing a NYCB version (or at least his version of a NYCB version) of R&J, rather than his version of Macmillan, it started to work. I don’t think this R&J will be the kind of crowd-pleaser that other NYCB full lengths are, and as long as ABT does Macmillan, the crowds will go to that, but for those accustomed to NYCB, it’s a treat.

But the evening belonged to Tiler Peck. The rest of the cast was good, and I’ll go into a bit more detail later, but it was her night, and she fulfilled, if not exceeded, my already high expectations based on what I’ve previously observed her do. Her first scene, with the nurse, was forgettable. Maybe it was nerves, but I think more likely it was a combination of uninspired choreography and the overdone makeup, which made her look like a girl from the wrong side of the tracks rather than the child of nobility. But her dancing, and her powder-keg stage presence took over after that, and her performance became a triumph. Her characterization was everything it was supposed to be – a headstrong, spirited, determined young girl. Whether this was a product of acting or Ms. Peck’s stage persona (which is the same as the role) doesn’t really matter; she was an authentic Juliet. But more than that, her dancing was superb. She squeezed more into her extensions than I thought her body could handle, but never looked hyperextended. She was both lyrical when the choreography called for it, and a lightning fast when the choreography called for that. In short, she was in total command. It was a debut to remember, particularly with the knowledge that her Juliet will get even better as time goes on.

And it makes one wonder what other gems may be mined from the NYCB corps (and the corps of other major ballet companies).


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PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 2:28 am 
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From the NY Times - with I might add, one factual mistake and a bit of selective amnesia on Mr. Macaulay's part about other productions when it comes to Romeo & Juliet in the ballroom scene. I've never seen a production where the lovers ability to meet and dance in the ballroom without detection has any realistic sense - a small mask is hardly going to hide the identity of sworn enemies. It's just one of the moments you just to have to believe in, go with and forget that there's no way someone wouldn't have seen them.

I had misgiving about Martins going with Per Kirkeby again - he should have learned his lesson from "Swan Lake". Personally, I've become a fan of Kirkeby's art, having seen his paintings in Denmark and the reaction to the "Swan Lake" sets from Danish audiences. Kirkeby is well known and respected in Denmark, and his sets seem a perfect fit in the more modern Operaen. But he doesn't go down well in NY (what this says about the artistic tastes of New Yorkers and Danes, I won't speculate), and especially since this was not a ballet originally created for the RDB - as his "Swan Lake" was - Martins really should have gone for a designer that would have appealed to NY audiences. I predicted this costume fiasco when I first heard about the production and Martins really has no excuse for making the same mistake twice.

Then again Macaulay should hardly complain, given that the Brits are among the best in creating fashion disasters. The Royal Ballet, in particular, is given to horrid colors and ghastly wigs.

Quote:
Those Star-Crossed Lovers With Sun-Splashed Colors

By ALASTAIR MACAULAY
Published: May 3, 2007

In the ballroom scene of Peter Martins’s new “Romeo and Juliet” for New York City Ballet, each pair of Capulet guests enters by posing dramatically, as if to say, “Do you like the way we’re dressed?” At the gala premiere on Tuesday (attended by Bill Clinton, who took the seat forever associated with Lincoln Kirstein and was greeted with a standing ovation), this certainly rang a bell.


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PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2007 10:37 pm 
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New York City Ballet
Romeo & Juliet
May 2 , May 3, and May 6, 2007
Lincoln Center; New York State Theater


Of all the ballet productions of Romeo and Juliet that I’ve had the pleasure of seeing, Sir Kenneth Macmillan’s version remains the gold standard. But Peter Martins’s new production for New York City Ballet is different in conception from Macmillan’s or any of the other classic productions. And though it is maddeningly uneven, Martins’s version is, at times, both innovative and refreshing, and seeing the same scenes with the same wonderful Prokofiev score choreographed through different eyes can be a revelation.

Martins’s very deliberate casting choices compels some initial comment. Much has already been made of the fact that Martins has cast the lead roles with dancers either barely out of the corps, still in it, or not even there yet. Even with his inside knowledge that these ‘kids’ could really pull it off, he was taking an artistic and economic risk by casting relative unknowns in a new version of a familiar and beloved work of art (no matter who seems to choreograph it), and one which has seen as many stars perform it, and perform it brilliantly, as there are stars in the springtime sky.. And audience concerns about this casting were apparent from the moment theses performances began – the deafening silence that greets the unknown leads when they first appear, for example. Moreover, even though Martins’s conception is more distilled than others, the choreography is demanding. This was no time to test novices.

But Martins’s kids pulled it off beautifully. Their collective dancing was superlative; and at times better than that. And although the acting may not have been on the same level as that demonstrated by an ABT principle, less acting was required since these dancers were the characters – they didn’t need to act much to make us believe them.

But Martins’s casting wasn’t just a gamble that paid off. The choice to cast leads with very young, fresh dancers was an essential and inevitable consequence of his apparent intention to create a very young, fresh ballet, making the contrasting ultimate tragedy all the more jarring.

Would that Martins’s unqualified casting success had carried over into the work itself. Instead, this “Romeo and Juliet” can be at times woeful and at other times riveting, at times baffling and at other times brilliant. Not surprisingly for a NYCB audience, this production is a stripped-down version of what ballet audiences usually see, with considerably less “theatre” and considerably more “ballet”. There are no superfluous (for ballet purposes) characters; no Rosalind, no harlots, no Lord and Lady Montague, no symbolic death figure to visualize impending doom, and no attempt to populate the town of Verona with a supporting cast that looks like they might have populated the town of Verona. There are no superfluous sets and props, no superfluous non-dancers planted around the stage, and not even superfluous lettering in the title of the piece (rather than wasting space with the word “and” or the unnecessary meandering of an ampersand, this piece is simply titled “Romeo + Juliet”). That’s fine: Free the story from its theatrical constraints and make it more a ballet of the story of Juliet and her Romeo than ‘Romeo and Juliet, the Ballet’.

But there’s a limit to how much Martins could eliminate as surplusage and still be true to the essential theatricality of the story and to the lush Prokofiev score. He couldn’t do a production that was totally lean and mean, even if that’s what he preferred. So what he provides is a production that is more streamlined and more crisply ‘balletic’ than the often bloated versions produced by other companies, but with the drama largely intact and some lovely and intelligent choreography (including, thankfully, for the balcony, bed, and bier) that begs to be inserted into a more opulent, and more authentic, presentation. It’s more than R&J-Lite, but less than a complete, fulfilling production requires. It is Martins-in-the-middle. And the angst-riddled minimalist set and unimaginative and inappropriate costuming don’t help.

The piece opens without the usual Prokofiev overture. Instead, Martins hits the audience with a clean and simple prologue consisting of the ominous cacophonous shriek of sound that in other productions precedes Act III, and a dreary tomb-like vision. Fine so far – a precursor of the tragedy to follow makes sense.

A change in lighting, and the same tomb-like structure becomes a weathered stone façade in front of which Romeo, Mercutio and Benvolio appear. The Mercutio and Benvolio we’re introduced to are the characters the audience is accustomed to seeing: boisterous, energetic, and somewhat irreverent. But Romeo is not that kind of guy. He’s not interested in horseplay. And since there’s no Rosalind, he doesn’t’ appear interested in women either. Instead, while his friends prance, Romeo stares mournfully, or wistfully, or perhaps hopefully into space, as if he were looking for or tracking some moving object. Why? Is he looking at the clouds in the sky? A sign? A swan? The audience doesn’t know why, but it knows early on that this Romeo is different. And in the crowd/fight scene that follows, Romeo is only tangentially interested. Alas, it is obvious that this Romeo is no Romeo.

This characterization of Romeo as dreamer/poet continues through the first Act, until Romeo takes up sword against Tybalt to avenge Mercutio’s death. What happens then is no simple victory in a sword-fight – it looks like an execution. The contrast to the earlier Romeo is both breathtaking and jarring, and completely in keeping with Martins’s overall conception of innocence overcome by violence. But if that was Martins’s intent in initially creating a relative powder-puff as a Romeo, it’s a long way to go to make that kind of dramatic point.

The scene that follows, which introduces the remaining characters, is essentially similar to other versions, but misses the mark when it attempts to be different. The point of this comic vignette of a scene should be to demonstrate that Juliet is beginning the physical and emotional development that will transform her from being a hyperactive pre-pubescent teenager who plays with dolls (or in this case, with her nurse), to being a hyperactive pubescent teenager beginning to mature both physically and emotionally. This version muddies the message: Indeed, it’s not clear whether Juliet recognizes that she’s beginning to develop physically, or happily observes that she hasn’t yet begun to develop at all. The scene is cute to watch, but it makes no thematic sense.

Fortunately, after this disappointing beginning, the piece grows. Martins wisely eliminates the scene outside the Capulet manse showing the guests arriving to the Capulet soiree. Instead, he opens the third scene inside the ‘ballroom’, where the Capulets, including Juliet, greet the guests as they arrive. And instead of the dramatic spectacle in the Macmillan version of seeing the gathered guests begin the court dance en masse, in Martins’s version Lord and Lady Capulet begin dancing by themselves, are then joined by the other members of the family, and only thereafter by the remaining guests. It looks right. Indeed, nothing is more emblematic of Martins’s streamlined concept at its best than the simple pleasure of watching this scene evolve (even if one really needs to suspend disbelief when Romeo and friends crash the party and none of the other guests take notice). Seeing Mercutio’s bravura, stop-the-show solo played as appreciative entertainment for the guests rather than a tolerated annoyance is worth the price of admission.

Although it would take too long to list them all here, there are many more examples of Martins’s conception when it works. Usually the Capulets are the bad guys. Here, it is the Montague clan that trespasses on a Capulet gathering in the scene that leads to Mercutio and Tybalt’s deaths. Usually Tybalt is a drunken bully; here Tybalt is a petulant bully, with a hint of intelligence. Usually Paris is portrayed as an ardent and handsome suitor who doesn’t deserve his fate; here Paris is a creep. Usually Lord Capulet is merely lord of the manor; here Lord Capulet (as portrayed with intelligence and sensitivity by Jock Soto) has a sense of honor, a sense of decency, and an awareness of his loss of control that adds a new dimension to the tragedy on the stage. And even though the corps dancing bears little relationship to townspeople kicking up their heels, or their fellow townspeople, in downtown Verona, the fact that the corps is really dancing parts of a ballet, rather than being either in-character with limited range of movement or perimeter decoration, is a welcome point of view (even though, in result, this very NYCBish corps work has nothing to do with the story, and could just as easily be transplanted into some other, perhaps plotless, ballet). And perhaps the most intelligent and successful reimagining of all is Martins’s decision in the ‘Mandolin Dance’ to jettison the ‘wedding dancers’ found in other productions and replace them with street urchins performing for tips in what passes for the center of town. The young student-dancers who pull this off at each performance (they deserve to be identified: Spartak Hoxha, Jonathan Alexander, Austin Bachman, Joe Gordon, and Ghaleb Kayali) charm the audience out of their seats.

The pros and cons of Martins’s conception notwithstanding, it is Martins’s kids who steal the thunder and provide the indelible memories.

At Wednesday’s performance, Romeo was danced by Sean Suozzi as the nice boy next door. Ardent and touching, Suozzi looked like the dreamer he was portraying, moved with grace, and partnered effortlessly. Amar Ramasar’s Tybalt required a bit more pizzazz, but his performance fitted Martins’s conception well.

But the evening belonged to Tiler Peck. Recently promoted to soloist, Ms. Peck fulfilled, if not exceeded, my already high expectations based on what I’d previously observed her do. Her powder-keg stage presence and high-intensity execution quickly quashed any notion that this young, diminutive, and relatively inexperienced dancer would be unable to carry a full-length performance. On the contrary, her performance was a triumph. Her characterization was everything it was supposed to be – a headstrong, spirited, determined young girl. Whether this was a product of acting or Ms. Peck’s stage persona (which is the same as the role) doesn’t really matter; she was an authentic Juliet. But more than that, her dancing was superb. She squeezed more into her extensions than I thought her body could handle, but never looked hyperextended. She was both lyrical when the choreography called for it, and lightning fast when the choreography called for that. In short, she was in total command. It was a debut to remember, particularly with the knowledge that her Juliet will get even better as time goes on.

Thursday’s Juliet, Kathryn Morgan, does not have the electric personality that Ms. Peck has. But this young corps dancer, whom I had not previously seen (her picture was not even on the NYCB web site when casting was announced), presented a Juliet who was as much a sweetheart as a spitfire. Hers was a kinder, gentler Juliet. Ms. Morgan’s simple warmth, combined with her surprisingly accomplished technique, once again proved the wisdom of Mr. Martins’s casting choices.

Ms. Morgan’s Romeo was Seth Orza. More of a classic “hunk” than Mr. Suozzi, Orza looked a bit less comfortable with being a dreamer. But his dancing was dynamic and his partnering was attentive and accomplished. Tyler Angle, was a wonderfully nasty Tybalt. Diabolical, powerful, and slick as a snake.

But perhaps the most surprising and most rewarding performance came this afternoon. Erica Pereira, an 18 year old apprentice, simply stole the audience’s heart. Though her technique is not as evolved as Ms. Peck’s or Ms. Morgan’s (which is to be expected), and though her acting is not quite on the same level (her face goes blank while she’s transitioning from one theatrical punctuation to another), she nevertheless pulled off a remarkable performance. She did everything that the choreography threw at her, and did nearly all of it beautifully. Her strength now is her lyricism – her movement quality is beautiful to watch, particularly since she is blessed with a classic long-legged dancer’s body that naturally makes every movement sensual. On her, even the disappointing costumes looked good. And when she wasn’t thinking about what she was going to do next, her acting was surprisingly accomplished. Indeed, she pulled off the best “tomb and scream scene” of the three. She’s not a wunderkind, but she’s a delightful young dancer. What a pleasure it will be to watch her grow.

Her Romeo, Allen Peiffer (like Suozzi and Orza, a member of the corps), was a perfect match for Ms. Pereira. Not only did he look and dance the part as if he’d been doing it for years, he seemed well aware that his Juliet might require more attention than would a more experienced dancer, and he provided sure support throughout the performance. And Craig Hall’s Tybalt was appropriately, and consistently, mean.

Mercutio and Benvolio were portrayed on Wednesday by Andrew Veyette and Austin Laurent, on Thursday by Adam Hendrickson and Adrian Danchig-Waring, and today by Daniel Ulbricht and Antonio Carmena. All performed admirably and with boundless energy and technical ability. Although singling out one of them is unfair since each of them was superb, Mr. Ulbricht’s dazzling technique merits special notice.

Martins’s Nurse is more of a randy aunt (perhaps the opposite of the characteristic maiden aunt) than the usual overstuffed nursemaid cum babysitter. Amanda Hankes on Wednesday, Gwyneth Muller on Thursday, and Dena Abergel today performed the role with bawdy enthusiasm.. Paris (Adrian Danchig-Waring on Wednesday, Christian Tworzyanski on Thursday, and Jonathan Stafford today) was no one you’d want your daughter to marry (with the possible exception of Mr. Stafford, who was nowhere near as creepy as his predecessors in the role). And at both performances, Albert Evans was majestic, commanding and decisive as the Prince of Verona, but the characterization was more “chief of police” than prince of Verona. Nilas Martins (Wednesday and Thursday) and Ask la Cour (today) each portrayed a youthful, and somewhat naïve, Friar Laurence.

Finally, as Lord and Lady Capulet at each of the performances, Mr. Soto and Darci Kistler provided mature anchors for the otherwise youthful performances. And at each of the curtain-calls, Ms. Kistler, yesterday’s baby ballerina, seemed to look down at that night’s Juliet to congratulate her, perhaps remembering, with a hint of wistfulness, what it felt like to hear your first ovation from an appreciative and enthusiastic audience, and what it felt like to be so good so young.


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PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2007 8:27 am 
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Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2004 11:01 pm
Posts: 328
Location: New Jersey
Now I can feel comfortable finally reading what Macauley had to say. Kate, if you have access to any other reviews, I'd appreciate the opportunity to see them.


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