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 Post subject: American Ballet Theater: 2002-03
PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2002 6:28 pm 
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Location: Canada
Hi!<BR>The ABT website has finally been updated and so now we have an idea of what the company will look like for the next year. <P>If the website is accurate, aside from the names already mentioned (Sean Stewart, Yan Chen, Rosalie O'Connor), Clinton Luckett, Erin Ackert, Giray Atalay, Jerry Douglas, and Yu Xin also departed after last season. Jennifer Quent and Christin Sevrini are not listed on the main roster page, but are listed in the separate corps page. After all the talk about NYCB, this is a far larger exodus!<BR>Kate


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theater: 2002-03
PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2002 7:36 pm 
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Thanks for the update, ksneds. For those who haven't been to the ABT website, you're in for a treat:<P> <A HREF="http://www.abt.org/" TARGET=_blank>http://www.abt.org/</A> <P>


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theater: 2002-03
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2002 6:47 am 
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Location: Montreal, QC, Canada
MEGAN CROWTHER - The Derrick, August 5, 2002:<BR> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><B>Teen with Clarion ties to join American Ballet Theater in New York</B><P>Sarah Lane, a Rochester, N.Y., teen-ager with Clarion ties, danced to a silver medal in the USA International Ballet Competition this summer in Jackson, Miss.<P>Lane, who has wanted to be a professional ballet dancer for as long as she can remember, will join the American Ballet Theater in New York City in September. She has signed a contract to become part of the organization's Studio Company.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><B>more...</B><BR><p>[This message has been edited by Marie (edited August 05, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theater: 2002-03
PostPosted: Fri Aug 30, 2002 7:32 pm 
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In the Cleveland Plain Dealer:

Quote:
Giselle' comes to Cleveland more


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theater: 2002-03
PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2002 6:50 pm 
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In the NY Times:

Quote:
Kevin McKenzie, the artistic director of American Ballet Theater, said the idea for the company's coming "Tribute to George Harrison" grew out of a conversation with Wallace Chappell, a company administrator, the day Harrison died last November.

"I went to Wallace, who I knew to be an old rocker," Mr. McKenzie recalled. " `Feel a little old, do we?' I said to him. Then he asked, `Has anyone ever done ballet to Beatles music?”
Click for More


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theater: 2002-03
PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2002 7:54 am 
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Location: San Diego, California, USA
From the Boston Globe:

'Corsaire' literally waits for its ship to come in - with costumes and sets

By Louise Kennedy, Globe Staff, 10/10/2002

Quote:
Because the sets and costumes for ''Le Corsaire'' are on a container ship off Seattle, FleetBoston Celebrity Series audiences next month will see ''Giselle'' instead.



The ''Corsaire'' costumes had been in Japan, along with the American Ballet Theatre dancers who were wearing them on tour. The container left Kobe on the Hapag-Lloyd container ship Paris Express Oct. 1, due in Seattle tomorrow. But the 10-day lockout at 29 Pacific ports, in which President Bush intervened on Tuesday, has left a backlog of goods on the docks and waiting ships that could take as long as 21/2 months to clear, according to the Associated Press.
MORE...


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theater: 2002-03
PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2002 1:15 pm 
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In the Cleveland Plain Dealer:

Quote:
Dancers to rotate roles in American Ballet's 'Giselle'

American Ballet Theatre will bring a dazzling array of international stars to Cleveland for six performances of "Giselle," the quintessential romantic story ballet, Oct. 30 through Nov. 3 at the State Theatre in Playhouse Square. more


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theater: 2002-03
PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2002 1:18 pm 
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In the Boston Herald:

Quote:
`Corsaire' hostage at sea, `Giselle' to the rescue more


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theater: 2002-03
PostPosted: Sat Oct 19, 2002 5:22 pm 
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Hi!
I attended the matinee performance today, Saturday October 19, and wanted to post some comments. I'll write a full review sometime in the next few days (as well as reviews of more performances). Apologies if my writing is not completely coherent-I returned yesterday from a trip to India and have yet to return to NY time!

I was interested to see the ABT roster in the program. Jennifer Quent and Christin Severini have left the company, and though Buck Collins is not listed in the program, he is now listed on the website (the programs were probably printed prior to his signing a contract with ABT).

The first ballet was "The Garden of Villandry", a pas de trois choregraphed by Martha Clarke, Robert Barnett and Felix Blaska to music by Franz Schubert. Jane Greenwood's costumes have a Victorian era feel, with the woman (Sandra Brown)in a floor length, long-sleeved white/black dress and heeled shoes, the younger man (Carlos Molina) in a suit and the older man (Ethan Brown) in more formal long tail-coat like jacket. The ballet provides a brief glimpse into the relationships between three people. The exact relationships are unclear, but a brief kiss between the lady and Ethan Brown's older man hints at more than just mere aquaintance. The dancing was fluid and expressive, and obviously much time and thought was put into reviving this ballet. It was nice to see the actual ages of the dancers match their characters. Ethan Brown has matured into a fabulous character dancer, and this was reflected in the depth of his character. Molina's youth was reflected in his portrayal of the young man.

For reasons still not clear to me, Irina Dvorovenko & Maxim Belotserkovsky danced the pas de deux from the 2nd act of Swan Lake instead of Grand Pas Classique. The insert in the program indicated that Gennadi Saviliev would dance with Dvorovenko, but Belotserkovsky danced instead. This pas de deux seems a bit out of place without the set and corps, but it was perfect for Dvorovenko & Belotserkovsky. Dvorovenko has only been back on stage for a few months after a major injury (suffered at the beginning of the 2002 Met Season) and looked a bit tentative, especially during some of the supported turns en pointe. However, her husband partnered her with great care, and there were no obvious wobbles or glitches. Belotserkovsky has one of the best lines in ballet, and looks truely noble-a perfect match for Dvorovenko's elegance. I look foward to seeing them dance this season!

Marcelo Gomes and Paloma Herrera danced a solid "Sylvia Pas De Deux" to music by Delibes (if I'm not mistaken, the male solo in the pas de deux is part of Balanchine's staging of Coppelia). Gomes and Herrera are well matched in height and body-type, but his dancing seemed to have a lot more flow and smoothness. Herrera's fouttes were dead centered and powerful, and her balances long and solid, but she was just a bit lacking in smoothness-i.e. less flow between the moves and more angularity of the arm positions.
Gomes is more earthbound than dancers like Corella and Acosta, but his technique just keeps improving. His beats were precise, his jumps high and his manner regal. Gomes has also continued to devleop as a partner, and handled the difficult partnering in the pas de deux with aplomb.
However, I have to agree with the poster on BalletTalk who commented on Gomes' peculiar preparation postion for tour le en airs. His torso faces the audience, but his feet in fifth are twisted so that his turnout is towards the wings. It's as if he is prerotating his body before jumping. The strange position becomes more obvious in the series of tours during the coda, so perhaps is occurs when Gomes is trying to compensate for a less than 360 degree rotation in the air. Other than looking a bit odd, this peculirity did not affect the impact of his dancing. I do wonder however, if it could become a problem if the twisting puts added stress on his joints or ligaments/tendons.
Their performance was also notable for the daringness of the swan dives, with her head nearly grazing the floor before he lifted her back up into the final pose.

After intermission was Balanchine's "Symphony in C". I definately think that SinC looks better from above, and regretted not finding a seat up in the mezzanine. The ballet also looks crowded on the small stage at City Center. The conductor, David LaMarche, set a tempo appropriate to ABT though he did speed up to keep up with Corella in the 3rd movement. David Hallberg and Gillian Murphy were stellar in the first movement. In the last year, Hallberg has emerged as one of ABT's best young male dancers-and a rare tall dancer in a relatively short (male dancer-wise) company. His dancing, though lacking in refinement (which will surely come with age and increased maturity), is full of energy and complimented by a smile that indicates his joy in dancing. It is much more pleasant to watch a dancer who clear enjoys being on stage, rather than a dancer who is just going through the motions. Hallberg sailed through the jumps, though looking a tad rushed, and seemed to be a competent partner for Murphy. He's pretty to watch with his long limbs, and I look foward to seeing him develop as a dancer in the coming years. Also in the first movement, I think Carlos Lopez danced in place of Gennadi Saviliev.
Carreno and Ananiashvili danced a solid, if not totally inspiring 2nd Movement. Ananiashvili is able to hold the balances seemingly forever, but sometimes, like Herrera, she can lack in fluidity of motion. Carreno was, as usual, an excellent partner. As an aside, Carreno appeared to be wearing a ring on his right hand ring finger. I believe that wearing any personal jewelry is a big ballet no-no (a hazard to costumes and to one's partner) so it surprised me to see the ring being worn.
Considering that he is scheduled to dance at every performance during the City Center season, it is amazing how much energy Angel Corella exudes. In this performance, he was dancing Symphony in C at a NYYB tempo, with Xiomara Reyes and the corps struggling to keep up! It was hard to tell weather Reyes was just a half step behind or whether Corella was throwing in extra pirouette rotations, but in the side by side piroutte sequences, Reyes looked as if she was seeing Corella spinning really fast and trying to throw in a extra rotation. Only she ended up finishing a second later (I don't think the pirouettes are supposed to be done sequentially). Eventually they got the timing right, and the result was stunning. In the past few years Corella has reined in his tendency to go over the edge in his bravura moves, and while today his pirouettes and tours were all dead centered and ended without any wobbles, I thought he was pushing the limit a bit. Some of Balanchine's choreography can be "edited" but 'Symphony in C" is a masterpiece that should be danced as intended. But it's hard to be upset with Corella's incredible talent and the utter joy he obviously gets from dancing.
Also notable in the third movement was John Michael Schert, recently promoted to the corps, who had a long limbed elegance in his dancing.
Sascha Radetsky, also recently returned after a very long break due to injury, danced a fine Fourth Movement with fellow Kirov Academy alum, Michelle Wiles. Radetsky is one of the senior corps men, and looks to be in excellent shape. His dancing was accented by his beautifully pointed feet and height in his jumps.

All in all, a nice performance of Symphony in C. It was interesting to see the two corps men, the future stars of ABT and the two principal men, who are the current stars of ABT.

Kate

<small>[ 10-19-2002, 19:32: Message edited by: ksneds ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theater: 2002-03
PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2002 1:54 pm 
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Thanks, ksneds, and here's an article in the NY Times about the gala:

Quote:
Celebrating That Great Pas de Deux, Love

Anna Kisselgoff, NY Times

Boy meets girl is ballet's eternal theme, or so American Ballet Theater suggested on Tuesday night in a high-energy gala that opened its two-week season at City Center. There was an exceptional performance led by Angel Corella, Ethan Stiefel and José Manuel Carreño in Jerome Robbins's "Fancy Free," more than brilliantly staged by Jean-Pierre Frohlich from the New York City Ballet.
<a href=http://www.nytimes.com/2002/10/17/arts/dance/17ABT.html?ex=1035830149&ei=1&en=3f53576811b7b01c target=_blank>More</a>


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theater: 2002-03
PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2002 10:11 am 
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Posts: 3375
Location: Canada
The NYTimes review of the "A Tribute to George Harrison":

Hope and Lyric Rock From the Gentle Beatle

By Anna Kisselgoff

Quote:
American Ballet Theater's latest instant hit, "Within You Without You: A Tribute to George Harrison," is the tribute set to music by a rock idol that its title proclaims.

To call it just a rock ballet is to limit the scope that its four choreographers offer to Ballet Theater's versatile dancers, who delivered a sensational performance at the work's premiere on Friday at City Center.
NYTimes review of "Within You Without You: A Tribute to George Harrison"


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theater: 2002-03
PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2002 11:23 am 
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Location: Montreal, QC, Canada
Martin Knelman - Toronto Star, Oct. 21, 2002:
Quote:
Kudelka takes New York

As it turned out, Kudelka had no cause for opening night jitters. Sin And Tonic — a rueful, high-energy piece about love and pain and the whole damn thing — is a strikingly original work expertly performed by the best of all possible dancers, especially Craig Salstein and Carlos Lopez in the title roles.
To read more go to the Entertainment section of the Toronto Star


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theater: 2002-03
PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2002 12:25 pm 
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ABT- Sunday October 20 Matinee and Evening performances

The matinee opened with a performance of Clark, Barnett and Blaska's "The Garden of Villandry", this time danced by a younger cast including Melissa Thomas, Dartanion Reed and Julio Bragado-Young. Though this cast did not have quite the seamless flow seen the previous day (with S. Brown, E. Brown and C. Molina), it was still a wonderful performance. Dartanion Reed's young man was shy, but clearly interested in Thomas's energetic young lady. Julio Bragado-Young, though just a few years older than Reed, brought an unexpected maturity to the character of the older gentleman. Bragado-Young has quietly developed into a very nice character dancer, and had obviously put a great deal of thought into the details of his performance-for instance the gentle wiping of his eyeglasses with a handkerchief. A move that can seem very banal, was infused with a gentle tenderness. It certainly made the performance come alive.

Next, Gillian Murphy and David Hallberg (substituting again for Jose Manuel Carreno) brought down the house in "Grand Pas Classique", a bravura pas de deux by Victor Gsovsky to music by D.F. Auber. Murphy imbues her dancing with a delightful, fresh sparkle, and has a wonderful crispness to her attack. She was quick, but did not blur her movements. The solo allowed her to show off her fantastic pirouettes-singles, doubles, and triples (possibly a quad too) and demonstrated the quickness of her feet.
David Hallberg has obviously caught McKenzie's eye and quite rightfully so. A tall, (very)blond dancer, Hallberg has gloriously long limbs and a youthfully elegant appearance. Though just 20 years old, he also has the talent to make great use of his balleticly perfect proportions. Hallberg is reminiscent of a young Stiefel with his high, airy ballon and had little trouble with the difficult tour le en airs, pirouettes and tour jetes that are liberally sprinkled in Gsovsky's choreography. His partnering was excellent, though he looked very focused-age and more mileage as a partner will help him to relax and express more when partnering. Hallberg is also still a little wild and unfinished (think Angel Corella in his early ABT seasons), and I'm sure that he as he gains more experience and maturity, his dancing will have more polish!

After a intermission, the performance continued with Kudelka's new ballet, "Sin and Tonic", to music by Edgar Meyer. In this matinee, Joaquin de Luz was the Cupid who brought together the young lovers, Paloma Herrera and Carlos Molina. Craig Salstein and Carlos Lopez, as the title characters, Sin and Tonic, brought spice into Cupid's recipe of love. Jamar Goodman, Jared Matthews, Alejandro Piris-Nino, Gennadi Saveliev and Eric Toto were the the black attired The Wall.

Scott Zelenski's lighting and Denis Lavoie's costumes brought a dramatic touch to this loosely woven story of love and the not so happily ever after.
As the youthful lovers, Herrera, in a simple dress, and Molina in suit and fedora, shyly flirted until DeLuz's delightful energtic Cupic brought them together. However, Sin and Tonic, a delighfully mischevious duo, made sure that there was no happily ever in this story. The lovers return to the stage twice, each time obviously increasingly intoxicated with love and liquor. Eventually the drunken cavorting ends in what appeared to be an assualt of sorts-too much liquor making the young man too bold in his actions with his beloved. The increasigly somber mood was introduced with the appearance of The Wall, five men dressed in black, who slowly proceed hand in hand, very slowly stepping and posing in demi-pointe.
When the lovers reappear, they are clearly arguing, the woman upset, the man appearing to be regretful of his actions. The Wall continues to advance, and contort into circles with the dancers rarely breaking the hand in hand chain.

The ending left me perplexed. The ballet concludes with Cupid supported by The Wall,and the lovers together, but it was unclear whether they were truely at peace with the situation. Did Cupid fail? Did Sin and Tonic prevail? I also thought the choice of ending music was poor-there was no clear ending in the music, nor did the music or action wrap up the story and theme. It just left me wondering what I had missed.

Whatever the choreographic weaknesses, the dancing was excellent. De Luz was energetic, with high tours and twists and precise positions.
Herrera's dancing was perfect for her character-sexy, but believable as the young lover with innocence shattered. However, for me, it Molina who really stood out in this ballet. He was delighfully mysterious and mischevous in the suit and fedora, but youthful enough to make the scenes of drunken, immature love believable. Molina has a wondefully expressive face and a slender, slinkily elegant body which he knows how to use in creating a character. You could really see the progression of his character from shy young lover, to drunken, immature young man, to shaken, sober man realising his drunken mistake. Molina looked much more comfortable in this ballet than later in the day in Symphony in C. Herrera is well matched with him, and I hope Molina gets more opportunities in non-traditional roles.

The matinee ended with Angel Corella, Carlos Lopez and Marcelo Gomes cavorting in "Fancy Free". The three dancers were clearly enjoying every minute of this delighful Robbins ballet about three sailors on shore leave. It was very interesting to this ballet, which is so classically American, performed by three non-American dancers (at NYCB it's almost always been performed by Americans-Chris Wheeldon and Ben Millipied the recent exceptions). Yet, Corella, Lopez and Gomes put their heart and soul into the characters, savoring every detail and comic moment, and are quite believable.
This is a difficult ballet to perform because it is dated, and oh so politically incorrect ( :o ) ). The dancers and the audience must leave their late 20th century/21st century preconceptions behind and just enjoy the humor and dancing. There's a fine line in Fancy Free between being campy, and for lack of a better word, swishy. At times I felt that Marcelo Gomes' Rhumba, though wonderfully danced-at times it's like he has not a bone in his body just complete sineousity, was a bit too "grind and bump" (I think that's the right phrase). I'm not sure how to define the line, but perhaps it's best explained in comparing Gomes to Damien Woetzel who has long peformed the Rhumba role at NYCB. It's as if Woetzel's character is doing an American imitation of a Rhumba, while Gomes' character is actually doing the Rhumba (a case of knowing your character too well!). I think it would also be better (and ABT and NYCB) is the costume pants were a tad less skin tight. I will have to pay more attention to the other ABT cast in Fancy Free and also see NYCB peform it in the winter season. Keep your eye out for future commentaries on Fancy Free!

In the evening, the order of ballets was reversed from the program, so the evening started out with "Symphony in C". Again, I feel that the ballet suffers due to the small size of the City Center stage and the slightly slower tempo. Also, I felt that unlike at NYCB, the men really stand out in the ABT performance and I'm not sure that was what Balanchine intended. It's a matter of taste, but I prefer the men to be less flashy, and let the ballerinas be the center of focus.

Maxim Belotserkovsky and Irina Dvorovenko were elegant in the first movement-he doesn't seem to be a natural jumper, but has very centered, fast pirouettes. In the 2nd Movement, Carlos Molina appeared overwhelmed by Veronika Part. They are well-matched in height, she just a inch or so taller when on pointe, but Part is larger than the typical American ballerina (which is still not big at all) and Molina is very slender and sinewy. He was clearly concentrating heavily on the partnering, and this took a little away from the overall appearance of the dancing. Part's balances were excellent, though some of the supporting poses looked a bit strained. Gillian Murphy and Ethan Stiefel were off in the in the 3rd movement-initially he was tacking on more rotations, then in the end she did a double to his single! However, the both are a pleasure to watch and he gets so much elevation in his jumps! He did a simpler series of tour with leg in second, leaving out the piroettes that Corella added in before each tour. Still though, a beautiful interpretation. However, I feel that the dancers need to agree on the steps in rehearsals because the competitive feel of the dancing takes away from the pureness and simplicity of Balanchine's choreography. Better to leave out a rotation and keep the synchronization. Ricardo Torres and Anna Liceia did a good job in the 4th Movement. The finale loses some luster because the dancers seemed compressed in an effort to get the full cast on the small stage.

Nina Ananiashvili and Marcelo Gomes then danced the "Sylvia Pas de Deux". She again chose to wear her own tutu, which did not match with Gomes' tunic. I preferred the color of her tutu, but I think it's more important that the costumes match. He continues to seriously cheat off the floor in his tour le en airs, but as long as it doesn't make him prone to injury, I can live with it. Gomes' technique has improved greatly over the last couple of years, and with it his confidence onstage. His solo was well danced, except for the increasing cheats in his jump rotations, and he was a solid partner for Ananiashvili, who was as amazing as ever in her seemigly endless balances.

Follwing Ananiashvili and Gomes, Paloma Herrera and Jose Manuel Carreno brought down the house with their performance in the "Diana & Acteon Pas de Deux". This pas de deux, staged by Rudolf Nureyev to music by Cesare Pugni, is classic Nureyev, both in the choreography and in the briefness of the male costume (Nureyev was the first in Russia to not wear shorts (bloomers) over the tights in classical ballets, and was never known to be shy about his body!). I hadn't been overwhelmed by Carreno's performances this past year, but this was Carreno at his absolute best. He simply flew across the stage into the Nureyev trademark double tours (assembles??), soared in the grand jetes and did a circle and a half of the flying arabians. Herrera was up to the challenge and matched Carreno's bravura with a fabulous series of fouttes, ending in a supported multiple-multiple turn.
The evening ended with a new (I think this was the first performance with this particular cast) cast in "Within You Without You: A Tribute to George Harrison", with choreography by David Parsons, Ann Reinking, Natalie Weir and Stanton Welch to same of Harrison's famous songs. I will need to see this ballet again before writing a full review, but here are some general comments. Stanton Welch's choreography to "Something" was just perfect for Angel Corella. Corella, in Catherine Zuber's costume of red top and brown jeans was let free to exhilarate in the energy of the music. This is Corella at his hyoerkinetic best-allowed to show of his talent, free to do some improvisation, free to feel the music and smiling from ear to ear. The 2nd and 3rd parts of the ballet, did not make such a strong impact on me, though Gomes, Murphy and De Luz were interesting in Weir;s sexual charged choreography to "I Dig Love". A very differnt Gomes from the rhumbing sailor in "Fancy Free". In "My Sweet Lord", the finally, David Parsons lets the cast fully explore the music as the criss cross the stage, leaping, turning, twisting, spinning and just dancing! Interesting to see the men jumping together-here the shorter men definately are the higer jumpers!

Cheers!
Kate
Who will report in from the CTFD benefit later tonight!

<small>[ 10-25-2002, 18:54: Message edited by: ksneds ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theater: 2002-03
PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2002 3:14 pm 
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I was lucky enough to accompany Kate to the evening performance last night - my first time to see ABT! I found the performance excellent - a programme that managed to be both diverse and cohesive, with some excellent individual performances.

I was also a newcomer to Symphony in C, which I found extremely elegant. I have to say I found the company looking a little lacklustre until the Third Movement, when Ethan Stiefel brought a real joie de vivre to the piece. I agree with Kate that it looks a little disconcerting when the male partner is doing double rotations, and the female only single (not least when they are landing nearly a beat apart) - but I felt the energy that Stiefel brought to the piece was well worth it. He and Murphy were also a well matched pair - unlike, as Kate mentions, some of the other couples, who looked a little unbalanced. Irina Dvorovenko and Maxim Belotserkovsky also danced well together with some beautiful co-ordination, although I found her dancing somewhat mannered. The final scene, whilst crowded on the City Center stage, was danced with an alacrity that suited the choreography well.

The Sylvia Pas de Deux was danced with aplomb by Nina Ananiashvili - some lovely balances en arabesque. Marcelo Gomes' leaps and turns were well executed. But Herrera and Carreno quite out did them in the spectacular Diana & Acteon pas de deux. Carreno seemed to rejoice in the Nureyev choreography, with a combination of exquisite timing, and dashing bravura. Herrera also gave the audience a spirited and technically brilliant performance, whipping off fouettes with a combination of ease, grace and speed. It was breathtaking - and for someone not old enough to have seen Nureyev perform, brought with it a whisper of the extraordinary electric presence his performance brought to the stage.

I enjoyed the final piece, a tribute to George Harrison, and found it interesting that a piece with such diverse music and four choreographers could appear so coherent. I thought it offered a really interesting take on contemporary ballet, with some freshness of ideas and some of the best dancing of the evening. It was, quite literally, ballet with its hair down - and dancers and audience alike seemed to enjoy it.

<small>[ 10-22-2002, 11:21: Message edited by: MariaR ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theater: 2002-03
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2002 10:19 pm 
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Posts: 3375
Location: Canada
Hi!
Very brief notes from tonight...(10/22)

Robert Hill's new ballet made interesting use of the dancers. There was a nice solo for Angel Corella that allowed him to show off his incredible spinning abilities in a more free-spirited manner than in more classical ballets. However, Corella must have lost track of where he was onstage because he ran into the front most wing as he was leaving the stage. He didn't appeared to be injured, and I'm not sure whether his body hit the wing or just his arm. Gonna be a nice bruise though! There were some gorgeous in synch sequences for Corella and Herman Cornejo-with very similar body types and impressive turning abilities, they looked beautiful soaring in the air together.

Slightly different cast in the Harrison Tribute, but I liked this cast as much as the other, but for different reasons. DeLuz is much more restrained in the role Corella originated, but DeLuz's focused intensity serves the role just as well as Corella's exuberance. Carreno and Kent (? had a more mature feel in the pdd than did Abrera and Stappas did. Abrera and Stappas had youthful eroticism, Carreno and Kent a more mature passion.

Fancy Free was fun with Carreno, Stiefel and De Luz. I think Lopez was better with the mime on Sunday than Stiefel was today, but they both were wonderful overall. Carreno was perfect in the Rhumba-just enough camp! I think it might help Stiefel to adjust his make-up a bit. From the orchestra, what stood out were his red lips and seemingly shadow-surrounded eyes. Perhaps he could lighten up the area around his eyes and add color to his cheeks. He's got a great face, it's a shame to hide it with ineffective makeup.

More detail to come some time this week!
Kate


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