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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet Spring Season 2003
PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2003 9:25 pm 
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Brief commentary on the Wednesday Evening performance...

Wow!

Damian Woetzel and Wendy Whelan in the Rondo alla Zingarese section of "Brahms-Schoenberg Quartet" were just sensational. Both dancers used every note of music to perfection, with Whelan bringing a nice edge to her role and Woetzel spectacular as usual. This seems to be a great partnership.
Alexandra Ansanelli made another great debut, this time in the third section. While I very much like Peter Boal, I do think Millepied was stronger in the male solo- a little crisper and higher on the jumps.

Janie Taylor took over Yvonne Borree's role in "Thou Swell", and made it sizzle. Taylor brought a refreshing new zing and spice and delightful, sultry edginess to the role, Jennifer Ringer and James Fayette were wonderful in their solos, as were the other other two couple: Kister & Soto and Kowroski & Askegard.

"West Side Story" is just unbelievably amazing. It's a stunning blend of dancing, singing and acting, and Robbins' choreography is wonderful.
But, it's the dancers who make it so spectacular- each and every dancer on stage looked enthusiastic and gave an all out performance. And it's not too often that you get to see ballet dancers sing, and even rarer that you find a bunch that are this competent as singers.

With his dark haired good looks, expressive face and passionate, soaring dancing, Benjamin Millepied was a wonderful Tony. He reminds me a bit, at least appearance wise, of the actor who played Tony in the movie version. In this version, Maria doesn't have a whole lot to do, but Deanna McBrearty made the best of the role, and was well matched with Millepied.

Damien Woetzel, as Riff, sang very well and danced like only he can dance. It's just so impressive to seem him in "Cool", singing, dancing and then singing again without almost no hint of the exertion from the dancing in his voice.

Opposite Woetzel, Jock Soto was a powerful Bernardo, the two creating stunning tension in several scenes. It's not too often that dancers can keep the whole theater dead silent for many seconds, let alone when they are completely still on stage.

The other sensation of the ballet was Jenifer Ringer's fiesty Anita. Ringer sang and danced up a storm in "America". Amanda Edge was also good as Rosalia.

Aesha Ash and Antionio Carmeno deserve a special bravo for their excpetional salsa dancing in the "Dance at the Gym". Even from the back of the crowd they stood out.

Finally, Kudos to the whole cast for an impassioned performance, both with top notch dancing and solid singing in the finale. Even from up close in the orchestra section, the voices blended so nicely that it was hard to pick out individual voices

Kate


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet Spring Season 2003
PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2003 7:07 am 
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You make me wish I had extended my stay in NYC, KSneds! Here's a review in the NY Times:

Quote:
Riding a Carousel, and Other Diversions

JACK ANDERSON
NY Times

Works for large and small combinations of dancers and musicians were featured at the New York City Ballet's performance last Thursday night at the New York State Theater. <a href=http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/19/arts/dance/19PIAN.html target=_blank>more</a>


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet Spring Season 2003
PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2003 7:51 am 
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The information has been confirmed by the company, so I will post it:

NYCB apprentices Christian Tworzyanski and Sterling Hyltin have both received their corps contracts. Congratulations to both! Apparently more apprentices may receive contracts in the new future.

Kate


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet Spring Season 2003
PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2003 8:06 am 
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One more comment on last night...

Thinking back, it seems quite appropriate that Benjamin Millepied is dancing the role of "Tony" in "West Side Story".

Millepied was one of the dancers chosen by Robbins to be in the original cast of "Two and Three Part Inventions" when it was premiered at the 1994 SAB Workshop. He was not in the original cast of "West Side Story"-he was still an apprentice at the time, but obviously was a dancer that caught Robbins' eye.

Other original cast members who are still dancing in the ballet:

Deanna McBrearty, Amanda Edge, Jock Soto, Arch Higgins, Pascale van Kipnis, Elizabeth Walker, Jennifer Tinsley, Dena Abergel


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet Spring Season 2003
PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 7:27 am 
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Quote:
Serving Philip Glass, in Classical Style

ANNA KISSELGOFF
NY Times

Jerome Robbins's ballets have been brilliantly rehearsed this spring at New York City Ballet and the audience has responded with thunderous ovations. <a href=http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/20/arts/dance/20GLAS.html target=_blank>more</a>


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet Spring Season 2003
PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2003 8:31 pm 
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I'm briefly in New York for the Dance Critics' Association meeting and doing Elizabeth Zimmer's Kamikaze Writing Workshop. As part of the workshop we attended Friday night's performance of NYCB, and I thought I'd go ahead and share with you my brief review of the show. (As a side note, for those used my long-windedness, our assignment was to keep our reviews to no more than 300 words):

Quote:
New York City Ballet
June 20, 2003
New York State Theatre, Lincoln Center
"Ballade" "Thou Swell" "Western Symphony"
by Mary Ellen Hunt


Midway through Peter Martins’s "Thou Swell," which the New York City Ballet performed on their rep program last Friday night at the New York State Theatre, you realize that, unfortunately, you are only midway through.

Created last fall for the opening gala and set to sixteen songs by Richard Rodgers (arranged by Glen Kelly with the effect of an awards show medley), Martins’s loosely linked sketches of four couples romancing at a swanky nightclub fills the eye, but meanders dramatically and choreographically.

Although the dancers execute the steps precisely, attacking even difficult lifts without hesitation, the phrases come in fits and starts, often lapsing into posed coyness, vamping, or plain old high kicks, rather than developing into full-blown statements. Nevertheless, Martins cleverly provides swishing long dresses designed by Julius Lumsden and elaborate sets and mirrors created by Robin Wagner, all of which distract the viewer from the thinness of his choreography.

Indeed, there’s a lot onstage -- almost too much -- what with the classy set, two jazz singers (Debbie Gravitte and Jonathan Dokuchitz), sixteen dancers and a jazz combo, complete with upright bass, drums and baby grand.

In "This Can’t Be Love" Janie Taylor and Nilas Martins managed to cover the abbreviated space with abandon, as did Darci Kistler and Jock Soto in a beautifully phrased "Bewitched, Bothered, and Bewildered." Even so, the dancers brought themselves up short in a step or narrowly missed hitting the set more than once, leaving the impression that there was so much stuff onstage, there was no room left for the dancing.

To judge from the applause, though, "Thou Swell" is already crowd-pleaser.

Also on the program was George Balanchine’s "Ballade," led by Wendy Whelan and Robert Tewsley, as well as a crisply rendered "Western Symphony," which featured particularly witty performances by Alexandra Ansanelli and Albert Evans in the Adagio movement.


<small>[ 21 June 2003, 10:32 PM: Message edited by: mehunt ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet Spring Season 2003
PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2003 10:24 pm 
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Quote:
Midway through Peter Martins’s "Thou Swell," ... you realize that, unfortunately, you are only midway through.
LOL! That's what I felt about Balanchine's Robert Schumann's "Davidsbundlertanze" as well last week... However, I think most of the crowd agreed with me that time.


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet Spring Season 2003
PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2003 9:25 am 
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Hi!
Adrian Danchig-Waring has also received his corps contract. There are now 90 dancers in the NYCB.

Kate


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet Spring Season 2003
PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2003 7:17 am 
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Quote:
With the Verve of Revelers, or Singing West Side Gangs

JENNIFER DUNNING
NY Times

A newcomer to the New York City Ballet might have been hard put to decipher a company profile from performances on Friday night and Saturday afternoon at the New York State Theater. <a href=http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/23/arts/dance/23WEST.html target=_blank>more</a>


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet Spring Season 2003
PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2003 1:38 pm 
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New York City Ballet
New York State Theater
Friday, June 20, 2003

On Friday night, the New York City Ballet continued a run of excellent Spring Season performances with a program that spanned the breadth of the company’s large repertory. Included were Peter Martins’ Thou Swell, one of the newest additions to the repertory, Balanchine’s classic Ballade and his salute to the American West, Western Symphony. Each ballet was given a wonderful performance by corps and solo dancers alike.

Wendy Whelan and Robert Tewsley led a polished corps through Balanchine’s flowing choreography in Ballade. Exquisitely supple and fluid, Whelan drew out every nuance in the dreamy choreography, matching the detail of the steps beautifully to the details in Faure’s music. Each position was held for just the right period of time, so that individual steps melded into a flowing performance without being blurred or rushed. Whelan’s performance was complemented by Robert Tewsley’s equally elegant dancing and deeply attentive partnering. It was a delight to see Tewsley on stage, as he has been waylaid by injuries for much of his tenure at the New York City Ballet. His performance revealed a wonderfully flexible back and nicely finished quality in his dancing, though his landings remain rather heavy. Swirling in Ben Benson’s pink and lavender dresses, the corps was appropriately delicate.

Thou Swell, an energetic combination of ballroom dancing and ballet set to Richard Rodgers show tunes, was a dramatic change of pace. With an offstage orchestra, and an onstage trio, two live singers, Debbie Gravitte and Jonathan Dokuchitz, and sixteen dancers , the ballet is a whirlwind of dance and musical action. Dancing to “Isn’t it Romantic”, Darci Kistler and Jock Soto were elegant and moving, demonstrating the fluid partnership that has developed over two decades of experience together. With their long legs kicking high, Charles Askegard and Maria Kowroski added a cool air of sophistication to their duos while still appearing to enjoy every moment onstage. Jenifer Ringer and James Fayette, were more youthful, with a spunkiness and verve in their high-spirited dancing. However, it was Janie Taylor who gave the most sensational performance, sizzling in her duets with a seemingly reinvigorated Nilas Martins. A devilish smile on her face, she swooped and soared, reveling in the energetic, zesty choreography. The waitresses and waiters were delightfully precise in their brief sections. Robin Wagner’s set, with a mirrored ceiling and tiled floor, and Jules Lumsden’s stylish dresses and tuxes gave a realistic 1930s feel to the ballet. Paul Gemignani conducted the off stage orchestra.

Continuing the high spirited feeling was an outstanding performance of Balanchine’s Western Symphony. With John Boyt’s faux western town stretched out behind them, Jennie Somogyi and Nilas Martins were a good natured couple, Martins refreshing as the aw shucks cowboy trying to impress the girl. Somogyi exuded a brash confidence, blazing though the choreography without forgetting the details of the characterization. In the Adagio, Alexandra Ansanelli and Albert Evans were a match made in ballet comedy heaven. Dressed in Karinska’s black, sequined cowboy outfit, Evans was sentimentally comic as the flashy but gentle cowboy. As the object of his affections, Ansanelli was utterly delightful and droll, making the most out of each step in Balanchine’s tongue in cheek choreography. She soared confidently though the “tunnel” of corps ladies into Evans arms in the challenging “leaps of faith”. Maria Kowroski and Charles Askegard brought the ballet to an end with a Rondo full of dizzyingly fast spins and high kicks. Askegard’s long legs seemed to get in his way on the bent kneed spins, but otherwise his pirouettes were excellent, matching Kowroski in speed and tightness. The corps, stellar in all three movements, combined with all the soloists (and the “phantom” lead couple from the defunct third movement) for a fantastic solo, the curtain dropping on a series of impressive, synchronized fouettes.

All three ballets were lit by Mark Stanley, with Richard Moredock and Maurice Kaplow conducting Ballade and Western Symphony, respectively.


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet Spring Season 2003
PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2003 5:48 am 
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In the Boston Phoenix, Jeffrey Gantz writes about NYCB (after commenting on ABT Don Q):

Quote:
Don Q preview
Quixote at ABT, plus Who Cares? and Robert Schumann’s ‘Davidsbündlertänze’ at NYCB

....
AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE wasn’t performing on Sunday, but regardless it would have been hard to pass up the two Balanchine masterpieces, Who Cares? and Robert Schumann’s " Davidsbündlertänze, " at New York City Ballet. It was a strange bill: less appetizer than scrumptious dessert, Who Cares? nonetheless led off, and though you wouldn’t think that anything but another Balanchine work could follow Robert Schumann’s " Davidsbündlertänze, " NYCB finished off the afternoon with Jerome Robbins’s 1983 Glass Pieces. No problem for Anna Kisselgoff, who wrote in last Friday’s Times that the work is " cool Robbins: he keeps his emotional images under tight control as if to complement the rigorous structures of Philip Glass’s minimalist music. " But for me it’s Twyla Tharp whose extravagances complement Glass’s music; Robbins just makes it seem redundant. From the corps in practice clothes criss-crossing the stage in front of a yellow grid to the rote duet in front of a rote moving-corps shadow backdrop to the Iron John gathering of men, nothing on stage seemed as interesting as what was coming from the orchestra pit.
More....


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet Spring Season 2003
PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2003 7:15 am 
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Quote:
A Romantic's Wry Musings on Love's Sweet Song

JENNIFER DUNNING
NY Times

Given the early curtain time on Tuesday night for the New York City Ballet at the New York State Theater, it might have been possible to rush across Lincoln Center Plaza as soon as George Balanchine's full-evening "Midsummer Night's Dream" ended and catch American Ballet Theater dancing Sir Frederick Ashton's one-act "Dream" at the Metropolitan Opera House. <a href=http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/26/arts/dance/26DREA.html target=_blank>more</a>


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet Spring Season 2003
PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2003 7:19 am 
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Quote:
Anne Belle, Whose Films Captured Lives of Ballet Dancers, Dies at 68

JENNIFER DUNNING
NY Times

Anne Belle, a documentary filmmaker who specialized in portraits of New York City Ballet dancers, died last Wednesday at her daughter's home in Los Angeles. <a href=http://forum.criticaldance.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=4;t=002049 target=_blank>more</a>


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet Spring Season 2003
PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2003 8:33 pm 
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Greetings!
Apparently NYCB had a press conference today, and announced the major details of the 2003-04 season.

Two dancers will be joining NYCB....

Joaquin De Luz will be joining in September 2003 as a soloist. This is a long time coming, and I was wondering when it would be announced.

Sofiane Sylve will be joining in fall 2003 as a principal.

Here is the press release for the 2003-04 season:

For Immediate Release - May 25, 2003

NEW YORK CITY BALLET ANNOUNCES GRAND CELEBRATION OF CO-FOUNDER GEORGE BALANCHINE TO MARK HIS CENTENNIAL YEAR

Nearly 200 Performances Will Explore Heritage and Celebrate Vision
of One of the 20th Centuryís Most Influential Choreographers

The Centennial Celebration to Include Performances of 54 Works Choreographed by Balanchine, 42 of Which Were Created
for New York City Ballet

World Premiere Ballets Commissioned for the Celebration from Boris Eifman, Peter Martins, Susan Stroman, and Christopher Wheeldon

Special Guests to Include Valery Gergiev and
the Georgian State Dance Company

New York City Ballet will celebrate the 100th Anniversary of its co-founder George Balanchine, who was born in St. Petersburg, Russia, on January 22, 1904, with an extraordinary celebration of his life and work at the New York State Theater from November 23, 2003, through June 27, 2004.

In addition, New York City Ballet will bring Balanchine 100: The Centennial Celebration to audiences in St. Petersburg, Russia (July 30 – August 5, 2003); Copenhagen, Denmark (September 2–7, 2003); Washington, DC (March 1–8, 2004); and Saratoga Springs, New York (July 6–24, 2004). Plus, during September and October of 2004, NYCB is planning to continue the Centennial Celebration with engagements in Tokyo, and in Los Angeles and Orange County, California.

The most extensive celebration of its kind, Balanchine 100: The Centennial Celebration at New York City Ballet has been conceived by NYCB Ballet Master in Chief Peter Martins as an exhibition-style approach to Balanchineís life and work that will span his classical heritage and influences, his early years, and finally, his vision of a new ballet repertory, which he built at New York City Ballet from 1948 until his death in 1983.

During the course of the winter and spring seasons, the Centennial Celebration will feature 81 different ballets (18 in the winter and 64 in the spring), with only Apollo being performed in both the winter season, and again in the spring, when it will be part of a special one-night-only performance of the Stravinsky/Balanchine Greek trilogy: Apollo, Orpheus, and Agon. Of the 81 ballets being performed during the Centennial Celebration, 54 were choreographed by Balanchine.

In addition, the Centennial Celebration will pay tribute to Balanchineís legacy as a director and his commitment to building a new ballet repertory, not only with his own ballets, but through the work of numerous other choreographers whom he invited to create ballets for New York City Ballet. To this day, NYCB continues to honor Balanchineís legacy of new choreography, and for the Centennial Celebration, world premiere ballets will be created by Boris Eifman, Peter Martins, Susan Stroman, and Christopher Wheeldon.

Following the summer performances in St. Petersburg and Copenhagen, Balanchine 100: The Centennial Celebration will begin in New York City on Tuesday, November 25, 2003, with New York City Ballet performing an all-Balanchine program for its annual Opening Night Benefit at the New York State Theater. The celebration will continue with NYCBís annual holiday presentation of George Balanchineís The Nutcracker™, which runs from November 28 through January 4.

From January 6 through February 29, 2004, New York City Balletís winter repertory season will explore Balanchineís classical heritage and his journey from St. Petersburg, Russia, which he left in 1924. For the next nine years he worked throughout Europe in such cities as Berlin, London, Paris, Copenhagen, and Monte Carlo, before arriving in New York in 1933, where, with Lincoln Kirstein, he created the School of American Ballet and later, the New York City Ballet.

During his early years in New York, Balanchine also worked on Broadway, and in a tribute to his pioneering work in musical comedy, the winter season will also feature a world premiere by Broadway director and choreographer Susan Stroman.

The 2004 spring repertory season, April 27 through June 27, will celebrate the company Balanchine built, the New York City Ballet, and his creation of a new ballet repertory. For this nine-week spring season, in honor of Balanchineís celebratory music festivals, Peter Martins has programmed a four-week European Music Festival, a two-week American Music Festival, and a three-week Russian Music Festival.

The spring season will also feature world premiere ballets by Christopher Wheeldon (European Festival), Peter Martins (American Festival), and Boris Eifman (Russian Festival).

On two performances during the final week of the spring season, New York City Ballet will be joined by the Georgian State Dance Company, which is based in Balanchineís ancestral home in Tblisi, Georgia, and was one of his favorite performing groups. In addition, on Sunday, June 27 at 7 p.m., the Georgian State Dance Company will give a full-evening performance to close the spring season.

Widely regarded as one of balletís foremost choreographers and one of the great artists of the 20th Century, Balanchine had an immense influence on the world of dance, as well as a profound impact on the cultural history of New York City.

After arriving in America in 1933, Balanchine, with NYCB co-founder Lincoln Kirstein, first opened the School of American Ballet. Several short-lived ballet companies followed, culminating in the establishment of the New York City Ballet in 1948. From that time until his death in 1983, Balanchine led NYCB to international acclaim, while creating a new ballet repertory that is unparalleled in the history of dance. An authoritative catalogue of Balanchineís creative output lists 425 works created from 1920 to 1982, many of which are recognized as masterpieces of the 20th Century and are performed today by ballet companies around the world.

OPENING NIGHT AND THE NUTCRACKER

New York City Ballet will launch its New York performances of Balanchine 100: The Centennial Celebration with a one-time-only all-Balanchine program for the Companyís annual Opening Night Benefit on Tuesday, November 25, 2003. Program to be announced at a later date.

The Centennial Celebration will continue with New York City Balletís annual holiday presentation of George Balanchineís The Nutcracker™, from Friday, November 28, through Sunday, January 4.

George Balanchineís The Nutcracker™ is a beloved New York tradition that has been performed each year in New York City since its premiere on February 2, 1954. At that time the ballet was relatively unknown in the West, and the success of Balanchineís production for New York City Ballet paved the way for The Nutcracker to become one of the most popular ballets in America. As a boy Balanchine danced several roles in the Maryinsky Theaterís production of The Nutcracker and at the age of 15, he made his debut as the Nutcracker Prince. A favorite ballet from his childhood, The Nutcracker was chosen by Balanchine as his first full-evening production for New York City Ballet.

2004 WINTER SEASON ñ HERITAGE

The Centennial Celebration will continue with New York City Balletís 2004 winter repertory season, from January 6 through February 29. During this eight-week season, New York City Ballet will perform 17 ballets that explore Balanchineís classical heritage and early influences, as well as several of his own early works. The winter season will also include the Centennial Celebrationís first new ballet, a world premiere by Broadway director and choreographer Susan Stroman in a tribute to Balanchineís legendary contributions to the Broadway stage.

HERITAGE ñ Influences: Petipa, Ivanov, Fokine, Bournonville

Balanchineís first appearance on any stage was in St. Petersburg as a bug in a theatrical production of Shakespeareís A Midsummer Nightís Dream. As a tribute to that debut, New York City Ballet will begin its exploration of Balanchineís heritage with the choreographerís own production of A Midsummer Nightís Dream. Choreographed in 1962, A Midsummer Nightís Dream was the first original, full-length story ballet created in America.

Balanchine once said, ìEverything I taught I learned as a child in St. Petersburg at the Maryinsky School,î and to honor his classical heritage, in addition to George Balanchineís The Nutcracker™, the winter season will include CoppÈlia and Harlequinade, as well as Peter Martinsí stagings of Swan Lake and The Sleeping Beauty, all of which feature choreography after Marius Petipa, who served as ballet master of the Imperial Ballet Company at St. Petersburgís Maryinsky Theater from 1886 until 1903. In addition, Martinsí production of Swan Lake, also features choreography after Lev Ivanov, the Russian choreographer and ballet master best known for his work on Tschaikovskyís Swan Lake.

The season will also include students from the School of American Ballet performing Michel Fokineís Chopiniana. Choreographed in 1908, Chopiniana was the first plotless work that Balanchine encountered as a boy in St. Petersburg.

In 1924 Balanchine left St. Petersburg, eventually arriving in Paris, where he soon became ballet master for Serge Diaghilevís legendary Ballets Russes. It was for the Ballets Russes that Balanchine created two of his early masterpieces, Apollo (1928) and Prodigal Son (1929), both of which will be performed during the 2004 winter season.

Following Diaghilevís death in 1929, which marked the end of the Ballets Russes, Balanchine continue to travel and work throughout Europe. From August 1930 to January 1931 he served as guest ballet master for the Royal Danish Ballet and became acquainted with the work of August Bournonville, the prolific choreographer and noted teacher who served as the ballet master of the Royal Danish Ballet from 1830 to 1877. In a celebration of Balanchineís time in Denmark, the winter season will include Bournonvilleís Flower Festival in Genzano, as well as two works by Balanchine that were inspired by the Danish master, Donizetti Variations and Scotch Symphony.

HERITAGE ñ Early Works

On October 18, 1933, Balanchine arrived in America at the invitation of Lincoln Kirstein, whose great passion for the contemporary arts included the dream of establishing an American ballet company that would rival those of Europe, and who was convinced that Balanchine was the person who could make that dream a reality. Although Kirstein was intent on creating a ballet company right from the start, it was Balanchine who famously said, ìBut first a school,î and so, with the opening of the School of American Ballet on January 1, 1934, the two men took the first step toward creating a new American ballet company comprised of dancers trained by Balanchine.

In the spring of 1934, using students from the School of American Ballet, Balanchine choreographed Serenade, the first work he created in America, and one of his best-known ballets. Set to Tschaikovskyís Serenade for Strings and featuring 26 dancers, Serenade continues to be a staple of the NYCB repertory.

The School of American Ballet continues to train the vast majority of dancers who make up the New York City Ballet, and throughout the Centennial Celebration students from SAB will perform in a total of 12 different ballets, including most of the winter season full-length repertory.

On January 22, 2004, to mark the actual centennial of Balanchineís birth, New York City Ballet will perform a one-time-only program consisting of three of Balanchineís most important early works: Apollo, Serenade, and Prodigal Son.

Other early works created in America that will be performed during the winter season include Concerto Barocco, choreographed in 1941, and included on New York City Balletís first performance, which took place on October 11, 1948, at New Yorkís City Center Theater.

The winter season exploration of Balanchineís heritage will also include Tschaikosvsky Piano Concerto No. 2, which Balanchine choreographed in 1941 for American Ballet Caravan. Created as a tribute to St. Petersburg, Petipa, and Tschaikovsky, the ballet was originally titled Ballet Imperial and featured classical tutus and a backdrop painted to resemble a scenic view of the Imperial Russian capital. In 1973 Balanchine restaged the ballet without the elaborate production elements, and renamed it Tschaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 2. By any name, it is one of Balanchineís great masterpieces, and a pure dance expression of his classical heritage.

HERITAGE ñ Jewels

The winter season will also include Balanchineís Jewels, which he created in 1967 at New York City Balletís new home, the New York State Theater at Lincoln Center, which was built for Balanchine and NYCB. The first plotless, full-evening ballet ever created, Jewels consists of three acts ñ Emeralds, Rubies, and Diamonds ™ which pay tribute to the three countries that played such important roles in Balanchineís creative life: France (Emeralds), America (Rubies), and Russia (Diamonds).

New York City Ballet has not performed Jewels since 1999, and for Balanchine 100: The Centennial Celebration, the ballet will be presented as a major revival, featuring new set designs by Peter Harvey, who was Balanchineís original designer for Jewels.

HERITAGE ñ Broadway ñ Susan Stroman World Premiere

Another element of Balanchineís early years in America was his work on Broadway and in Hollywood. From 1936 to 1951 Balanchine created the choreography for more than 15 Broadway shows, working with such Broadway legends as Rodgers and Hart, Florenz Ziegfeld, George Abbott, and Josephine Baker. In addition, Balanchine also created the choreography for several Hollywood films including The Goldwyn Follies (1938) and I Was an Adventuress (1940).

For Broadway musical comedy, Balanchine created the first dances that functioned as essential elements of the story, and were not just plot-stopping interludes. He was also the first choreographer on Broadway, at his insistence, to be credited with ìchoreography byî rather than ìdances by.î

The first musical comedy to feature Balanchine choreography was Rodgers and Hartís On Your Toes, which premiered on April 11, 1936, starred Tamara Geva and Ray Bolger, and was set in the backstage world of ballet. A highlight of that production was the Slaughter on Tenth Avenue ballet sequence, which Balanchine added to the repertory of New York City Ballet in 1968, and which will be performed as part of the winter season.

In a tribute to Balanchineís pioneering work on Broadway, the first world premiere of the Centennial Celebration will be by five-time Tony Award winner Susan Stroman (The Producers, Contact, Crazy for You, Showboat). The evening-length ballet will feature music by Irving Berlin and Walter Donaldson, and will receive its world premiere on Friday, January 23.

2004 SPRING SEASON ñ VISION

For the 2004 spring season, New York City Ballet will continue Balanchine 100: The Centennial Celebration with a nine-week celebration of Balanchineís vision and his creation of an unparalleled new ballet repertory. The spring season will include 64 works, of which 42 are by Balanchine.

Also trained as a musician, Balanchine once said, ìI cannot move, I cannot even want to move, unless I hear the music first.î For New York City Ballet, Balanchine commissioned music from such celebrated composers as Stravinsky and Hindemith. He also produced several now-legendary festivals celebrating the music of Stravinsky, Ravel, and Tschaikovsky. In honor of those musical celebrations, the spring season has been designed as a nine-week music festival, featuring the music of 40 different composers.

The season will begin with a four-week European Festival (April 27 ñ May 23); followed by a two-week American Festival (May 25 ñ June 6); and finally, a three-week Russian Festival (June 8 ñ June 27).

VISION ñ European Festival ñ Christopher Wheeldon World Premiere

The spring season will open with a European Festival, featuring the music of 23 composers, and 20 works by Balanchine, including such favorites as Symphony in C (Bizet), Liebesleider Walzer (Brahms), Divertimento No. 15 (Mozart), La Valse (Ravel), and Union Jack (traditional British).

During the European Festival, the Company will present a one-time-only Balanchine Tribute program, for its annual Spring Gala on Wednesday, May 5, 2004. Guest artists and repertory for this special program will be announced at a later date.

The festival will also include Balanchineís The Four Temperaments, which features a score by Paul Hindemith, the first of a number of scores that were commissioned by Balanchine. Created in 1946, the ballet originally featured elaborate costume designs by Kurt Seligman. In 1951 Balanchine omitted the costumes in favor of black and white rehearsal clothes. This costuming became the signature look of NYCB, and the European Festival will also include the black and white Episodes (Webern).

In addition the European Festival will feature special tribute evenings to the music of France (April 27), Germany (May 1), Austria (May 6), Great Britain (May 15), and Italy (May 18).

The European Festival will also feature the first world premiere of the spring season, by New York City Balletís Resident Choreographer Christopher Wheeldon, and set to a commissioned score by the Scottish composer James MacMillan, who will conduct the NYCB Orchestra for the balletís world premiere. This will be the tenth ballet that Wheeldon has choreographed for New York City Ballet, and it will also mark the first time ever that Wheeldon has worked with a composer on a commissioned score. The Wheeldon premiere will take place on Saturday, May 8, at 8 p.m.

VISION ñ American Festival ñ Peter Martins World Premiere

Balanchine once said, ìI always wanted to be American,î and the second festival of the spring season will feature a two-week look at American music and the ballets inspired by that music.

The American Festival will begin on Tuesday, May 25, with an all-Balanchine program consisting of Who Cares? (Gershwin), Western Symphony (Kay), and Stars and Stripes (Sousa).

Also represented will be Jerome Robbins, whose ballets will be featured throughout the spring season. Well known for his work on Broadway, where he created such landmark shows as Gypsy, West Side Story, and Fiddler on the Roof, Robbins was also one of the 20th Centuryís greatest ballet choreographers, and New York City Ballet was his creative home for much of his career. Balanchine invited Robbins to join New York City Ballet as associate artistic director in 1949, and from that time until his death in 1998, he contributed nearly 50 works to the NYCB repertory.

The 12 Robbinsí works that will be featured during the spring season are: Afternoon of a Faun, The Four Seasons, and Dances at a Gathering (European Festival); Fancy Free, Glass Pieces, Iím Old Fashioned, Interplay, and West Side Story Suite (American Festival); and Andantino, The Cage, Circus Polka, and Opus 19/The Dreamer (Russian Festival).

The American Festival will also include Peter Martinsí Barber Violin Concerto and Calcium Light Night, which was the first ballet choreographed by Martins, and in 1978 became his first ballet to enter the NYCB repertory, at Balanchineís invitation. Martins, a champion of contemporary American music, will also create a new ballet for the American Festival, which will have its world premiere on Wednesday, June 2.

VISION ñ Russian Festival ñ Boris Eifman World Premiere

The final three weeks of Balanchine 100: The Centennial Celebration will consist of a tribute to the music of Russia, Balanchineís homeland. Although Balanchine once said, ìI am more American than Russian,î he still turned to the music of Russian composers, especially Stravinsky and Tschaikovsky, more than any others for inspiration.

Highlights of the Russian Festival will include many of the seminal Stravinsky/Balanchine masterpieces including Symphony in Three Movements, Duo Concertant, and Firebird. A one-time-only program on Thursday, June 10, will feature the Stravinsky/Balanchine Greek trilogy of Apollo, Orpheus, and Agon.

For the opening night of the Russian Festival on Tuesday, June 8, Valery Gergiev, Artistic and General Director of the Maryinsky Theater, will conduct the New York City Ballet Orchestra.

Other highlights of the Russian Festival will include Martinsí Zakouski, and a revival of Concerto for Two Solo Pianos, which Balanchine commissioned from Martins in 1982.

The festival will also include a world premiere ballet by the St. Petersburg-based choreographer Boris Eifman. This will mark the first time that Eifman has created a work for an American company, and the ballet will premiere on Friday, June 18.

In addition, the Georgian State Dance Company, from Balanchineís ancestral home in Tiblsi, Georgia, will join New York City Ballet for two repertory performances: Friday, June 25, and Saturday, June 26, at 8 p.m. One of Balanchineís favorite performing groups, the Georgian State Dance Company will also give a full-evening performance at 7 p.m. on Sunday, June 27, to close the spring season.

PRESENTATIONS ñ EXHIBIT ñ SPECIAL EVENTS

In addition to the performances at the New York State Theater, Balanchine 100: The Centennial Celebration will feature a wide array of special presentations, including pre-performance Ballet Insights and Family Insights discussions, as well as Centennial Celebration seminars on select Monday evenings throughout both seasons. Topics will include various aspects of Balanchineís creative life; dates and speakers for these presentations will be announced at a later date.

New York City Ballet will also produce a special Balanchine 100 Centennial Exhibition, which will be on display at the New York State Theater during the winter (January 6 through February 29) and spring (April 27 through June 27) seasons. Curated by Edward Bigelow, who worked with Balanchine throughout much of his career in America, the theater-wide exhibit will explore Balanchineís life and work through photographs, costumes, artifacts, and other ephemera. A limited-edition catalogue will accompany the exhibition.

During the course of Balanchine 100: The Centennial Celebration, New York City Ballet will also produce a series of one-time-only special events, which will include: Opening Night Benefit (Tuesday, November 25, 2003); The Nutcracker Family Benefit (Saturday, December 31, 2003); Annual Luncheon (Tuesday, February 3, 2004); Spring Gala (Wednesday, May 5, 2004); and Dance with the Dancers (Monday, June 14, 2004).

TOURING

In addition to performances at Lincoln Center, New York City Ballet will bring the Centennial Celebration to several continents over the next year and a half. For the first of these engagements, NYCB will return to Balanchineís birthplace for a one-week engagement in St. Petersburgís Maryinsky Theater from July 30 through August 5, 2003. The engagement, which is part of St. Petersburgís tri-centennial celebration, will close the 2003 White Nights Festival, and will feature such seminal Balanchine works as Serenade, Symphony in Three Movements, Symphony in C, and Concerto Barocco. This will mark only the third time in NYCB history that the Company has performed in Russia; the previous visits were in 1962 and 1972.

From September 2 through 7, 2003, the company will perform at the Tivoli Concert Hall in Copenhagen, Denmark. For these performances the Company will perform 14 ballets, including 6 by Balanchine. During the early 1930s, Balanchine lived and worked in Copenhagen as a guest ballet master for the Royal Danish Ballet.

Following the 2004 winter season at Lincoln Center, New York City Ballet will travel to Washington, DC, for a week of performances at the Kennedy Center, from March 1 through 8, 2004. This engagement, which will feature an all-Balanchine repertory, will mark the first time that the Company has performed in the nationís capital since 1987.

Following the 2004 spring season, New York City Ballet will bring the Centennial Celebration to its summer home in Saratoga Springs, New York, for three weeks of performances at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center, July 6 through 24, 2004.

The company will then embark on a tour of Japan and California, from September 24 through October 10, 2004, which will include week-long engagements at Tokyoís Bunkamura Hall; and at Californiaís Orange County Performing Arts Center and The Dorothy Chandler Pavilion at The Los Angeles Music Center.

PURCHASING TICKETS

Tickets for George Balanchineís The Nutcracker™ are currently on sale by mail, and will go on sale through the NYCB website at www.nycballet.com starting July 14. Tickets for the Opening Night benefit and all performances of George Balanchineís The Nutcracker™ will be available at the New York State Theater box office beginning September 29 and through Ticketmaster at 212-307-4100 beginning September 30.

Winter season subscription series will go on sale through www.nycballet.com beginning July 14, and by mail and through the NYCB subscription office at 800-580-8730 beginning July 18. Winter season subscribers will also have the opportunity to pre-order their spring season subscriptions at this time.

Single-ticket orders for the winter repertory season will be accepted by mail and through www.nycballet.com beginning September 29. Single tickets will also be available through Ticketmaster at 212-307-4100 beginning November 23 and at the New York State Theater box office beginning November 24.

Beginning January 19, spring season subscription series will go on sale by mail, through www.nycballet.com, and through the NYCB subscription office at 800-580-8730. Single-ticket orders for the spring season will be accepted by mail and through www.nycballet.com beginning March 12, through Ticketmaster at 212-307-4100 beginning April 11, and at the New York State Theater box office beginning April 12. Tickets for the Spring Gala benefit will be available through Ticketmaster beginning April 11 and at the New York State Theater box office beginning April 12.

For more information on the Opening Night or Spring Gala benefits, call the Special Events office at 212-870-5585.

The New York State Theater is located on the Lincoln Center Plaza at Broadway at 63rd Street. The mailing address for the NYCB box office is New York City Ballet, New York State Theater, 20 Lincoln Center, New York, NY 10023. For general information on tickets for any New York City Ballet performance, call 212-870-5570, or visit www.nycballet.com.

Balanchine 100: The Centennial Celebration is generously supported by the Harriet Ford Dickenson Foundation.

Lead support for the creation of new work is provided by The Irene Diamond Fund and members of the New Combinations Fund, and by the Lila Acheson and DeWitt Wallace Endowment Fund.

NYCBís performances are made possible in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

Major support for the 2003-2004 season is also provided by The Shubert Foundation and contributors to the Repertory and Education Funds.

The logo for Balanchine 100: The Centennial Celebration was inspired by a 1959 photograph of George Balanchine by Henri Cartier-Bresson.


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 Post subject: Re: New York City Ballet Spring Season 2003
PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2003 5:04 am 
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Pointe, counter-pointe
By Jean Battey Lewis for The Washington Times

NEW YORK — — An annual spring ritual played out in rainswept New York last weekend when the city's two major ballet companies danced a kind of pas de deux on opposite sides of Lincoln Center.
At Philip Johnson's elegant State Theater, specially built to George Balanchine's specifications, the New York City Ballet offered programs rich with works by its two founding directors, Mr. Balanchine and Jerome Robbins, and highlighted by a new and breathtakingly lovely ballet by Christopher Wheeldon.

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