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PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 7:44 am 
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Location: Estonia
Quote:
More Is More in Loaded Set by San Francisco Ballet
by JENNIFER DUNNING for the New York Times

Mr. Tomasson’s ballet opened the nearly three-hour program, serving as a fine introduction to his performers’ pristine classicism. A suite that included a solo, three duets, a trio and group dances, “7 for Eight” began with a duet for Yuan Yuan Tan and Yuri Possokhov that was notable for what it said about one facet of the company’s style. Ms. Tan is an obedient-looking dancer, but a great pleasure of “7 for Eight” was the luxurious look of each extension of her long limbs, a tendency in the dancing of the other company ballerinas as well.

published: July 31, 2006
more...


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 10:38 am 
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Location: Seattle, WA, USA
I take disappointed note of the fact that the SF Chronicle decided to contract with a New York freelance critic/writer for its report on its hometown company's appearance in NY. In the not so recent past, they would have sent the Chronicle Dance Critic (a position which seems to have been permanently consigned to the icebox).

The San Jose Mercury News also chose to run an AP wire service report on SFB in NY:

Mercury News on SFB in NY


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 12:01 pm 
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Francis Timlin wrote:
I take disappointed note of the fact that the SF Chronicle decided to contract with a New York freelance critic/writer for its report on its hometown company's appearance in NY. In the not so recent past, they would have sent the Chronicle Dance Critic (a position which seems to have been permanently consigned to the icebox).



Francis, I too was disappointed but not surprised that the San Francisco Chronicle hired a free-lance writer based in New York to review SFB at Lincoln Center. At least the Chron hired someone, Apollinaire Scherr, who has lived in the Bay Area, knows the company, and made perceptive comments about its dancers and choreographers (especially our local ones). As far as things changing soon at the Chronicle, I'm afraid you are right about the icebox. Rachel Howard's interesting (inside-the-Chronicle) take on the situation:

"The last two years have been chaotic ones for dance writing at the Chronicle. After the resignation of Octavio Roca, the paper—which serves the second-biggest dance capital in the U.S.—decided not to hire a staff dance critic. Sadly, this is in line with trends for dance writing across the country. . . .

"I still believe the Bay Area deserves a full-time dance critic at the Chronicle, and I can tell you the Chronicle has no plans to seek one. But the way to lobby for this is not by bitter demand. The Chronicle, like most newspapers across the country, is in a tight spot, fighting shrinking circulation and trimming staff. If you want a full-time dance writer at the Chronicle, do not moan angrily. Prove that good dance writing has an audience. Buy the paper instead of reading it for free online. Subscribe. When you read a piece of dance writing you respond to with feeling, whether positively or negatively, send a letter to the editor. Let them know you buy the paper, and you buy it because you want to read about dance."

http://rachelhoward.com/archives/2006/03/index.php


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 3:40 pm 
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Location: San Francisco
In his review of Sylvia in the New York Post (see p.1 of this thread), Clive Barnes describes perfectly what I don't like about the Mark Morris ballets I've seen:

Quote:
Morris, a modern dance master with classic leanings, still approaches ballet like a man talking a foreign language: with a misplaced confidence, a very limited vocabulary and a totally unconvincing accent.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2006 6:32 pm 
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Quote:
Morris, a modern dance master with classic leanings, still approaches ballet like a man talking a foreign language: with a misplaced confidence, a very limited vocabulary and a totally unconvincing accent.


Here's the opposing view (by Robert Greskovic in today's Wall Street Journal):


"Ashton, decidedly committed to the ways of academic ballet,
addresses the telling of Sylvia's story with an accent
on the pas, or steps. . . .
Mr. Morris, whose overall career remains grounded in the methods of
modern dance, uses ballet steps in his own, individual way to
emphasize the action, or drama, of the dancing. In the process, and
by means of much inventive pantomime, he tells this tale with
theatrical flair and originality. If you mistakenly look for Ashton's
approach in Mr. Morris's "Sylvia," you'll miss the modern-dance-based
creator's own handling of ballet steps, and you'll fail to find the
wit and beauty in Mr. Morris's retelling of this 19th-century story
of love offered, rejected and then requited."

Unfortunately the full review is only available to subscribers of the Wall Street Journal: http://online.wsj.com/public/us

For nonsubscribers, it will be available for $4.95 after 8/18.
http://online.wsj.com/public/search/pag ... &x=10&y=10


Last edited by bcx on Sat Aug 19, 2006 6:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 6:36 am 
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Another take on SFB at Lincoln Center, Nancy Dalva's "Letter from New York," in the current issue of Dance View Times (has SFB ever had so many reviews for one week of work? This is a fun one.)


". . .The dancers are direct, athletic, and open; unironic, un-angsty, and un-sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought (these being New York states of mind). They are clear, natural, technically skilled, generally full of heart and soul, confident, easy, and modest. In other words, they’re easy to love. It helps that the are divine looking, in an athletic, non-neurasthenic way. The women are gorgeous, and gorgeously assorted. The men are — shall we just cut to the chase? — really handsome, buoyant, with an unaffected masculinity.

"If I had to compare San Francisco Ballet to another company, it wouldn’t be another ballet company, and it wouldn’t be Mark Morris’s company, although he frequently choreographs for them. (To my eye, this is a tribute to Morris, and to his affectionate regard for this troupe. For as we were to see in the “Sylvia,” he loves them.) No, the troupe that comes to mind looking at SFB would be Paul Taylor’s. Nothing about technique, a lot about personality, American-ness, and an easy rapport with the audience. . . ."

http://www.danceviewtimes.com/2006/Summ ... tter3.html


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