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 Post subject: Pacific Northwest Ballet: Romeo & Juliet
PostPosted: Fri Sep 17, 2004 12:56 pm 
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Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Previews of Pacific Northwest Ballet's 2004-05 season opener, Kent Stowell's "The Tragedy of Romeo & Juliet," opening Thursday, September 25 and running through Sunday, October 3, 2004 at Marion Oliver McCaw Hall in Seattle.

R. M. Campbell in The Seattle Post-Intelligencer (includes thumbnail previews of the entire season):

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/classical/191126_clas17.html

Mary Murfin Bayley in The Seattle Times:

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/artsentertainment/2002037393_romeo17.html

Carole Beers in the King County Journal:

http://www.kingcountyjournal.com/sited/story/html/173499

<small>[ 17 September 2004, 03:08 PM: Message edited by: Francis Timlin ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Pacific Northwest Ballet: Romeo & Juliet
PostPosted: Wed Sep 22, 2004 10:53 am 
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Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Casting is now available at:

http://www.pnb.org/season/rj-casting.html


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 Post subject: Re: Pacific Northwest Ballet: Romeo & Juliet
PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2004 3:00 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 23, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 38
Location: Seattle, Washington, USA
As a high school English teacher, my depth of knowledge of Romeo and Juliet is roughly equivalent to my lack of ballet expertise. What little I know of ballet comes from what I've absorbed since becoming a balletomane when I started working for PNB School's Summer Course ten years ago.

That being said, I attended yesterday's opening night performance and fell in love with this ballet all over again. Although Patricia Barker is a bit over twice the age of the 14-year-old Juliet, she is absolutely convincing as a carefree adolescent girl falling in love in Act I. In Act II, she shades her dancing to reflect the new rush of adult emotions the star-crossed Juliet experiences as she deals with the realization that Romeo (a rakish and passionate Jeff Stanton) has killed her beloved cousin Tybalt (danced with aplomb by Stanko Milov). Le Yin danced the complex role of Mercutio with vigor and emotion. Flemming Halby and Victoria Pulkkinen, seasoned veterans in their roles of Friar Lawrence and the Nurse, were terrific as both characters grappled with the internal conflicts the story presents them.

Otto Neubert possessed a commanding presence as the Prince. Uko Gorter and Ariana Lallone as Lord and Lady Capulet, Nicholas Ade as Benvolio, and all the servants and courtiers (company members and PNB School students alike) delighted the eye throughout the performance.

The PNB Orchestra, directed by Stewart Kershaw, sounded fantastic, as did soprano Anne Carolyn Bird, baritone Erich Parce, and the chorus.

I am looking forward to another evening of R&J this Saturday night with another stellar cast, and anticipating even more eagerly the rest of this season's outstanding ballets.

<small>[ 24 September 2004, 10:34 PM: Message edited by: Dave ]</small>

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David Jensen
Pacific Northwest Ballet School
Summer Residence Director/
Eastside Administrative Assistant
dave@pnb.org


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 Post subject: Re: Pacific Northwest Ballet: Romeo & Juliet
PostPosted: Sat Sep 25, 2004 2:31 pm 
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Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Reviews from the Seattle area press from the Thursday, September 23, 2004 opening night.

Jim Demetre in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer:

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/classical/192346_pnb25q.html

Mary Murfin Bayley in the Seattle Times:

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/artsentertainment/2002045612_romeo25.html

Carole Beers in the King County Journal:

http://www.kingcountyjournal.com/sited/story/html/174122

In The Everett Herald, Patty Tackaberry interviews PNB Music Director Stewart Kershaw on the Tchaikovsky music put together to create the score for Kent Stowell's Romeon and Juliet:

http://www.heraldnet.com/stories/04/09/24/ae_romeo001.cfm


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 Post subject: Re: Pacific Northwest Ballet: Romeo & Juliet
PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2004 12:52 pm 
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Location: Seattle, WA, USA
A review from Bob Hicks in The Oregonian:

http://www.oregonlive.com/search/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/1096459008252200.xml?oregonian?alap


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 Post subject: Re: Pacific Northwest Ballet: Romeo & Juliet
PostPosted: Fri Oct 01, 2004 9:21 am 
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Location: Seattle, WA, USA
The Everett Herald's Patty Tackaberry reviews opening night. Performances continue through Sunday, October 3 at McCaw Hall in Seattle.

http://www.heraldnet.com/stories/04/10/01/ae_romeoreview001.cfm


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 Post subject: Re: Pacific Northwest Ballet: Romeo & Juliet
PostPosted: Thu Oct 14, 2004 11:36 am 
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Location: Seattle, WA. USA
Ample Dancing and Drama Hallmark of PNB’s The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet
McCaw Hall, Seattle, Washiington

25 September 2004
by Dean Speer

A reviewer in the local Seattle print media headlined that there was everything in Kent Stowell’s robust version of this balletic adaption of Shakespeare’s tale but, “... ah, dancing.” I have to strongly disagree and I think this is one of those cases where it looks as if two different people were at two different shows.

Music Director Stewart Kershaw put together a score from lesser- and little-known Tchaikovsky that, as a whole, really does work together to create the right kind of atmosphere and musical catalyst for Stowell’s vision of how to play out this famous story.

The largest dance scenes are in Act I, although there is PLENTY of dancing for Act II as well. I think the difference is that Act II contains scenes that are more intimate in scale and really zing the drama along, like Juliet’s decision to take the sleeping potion and the rush of events that cascade down from that. The only group dance in this act is of the young girls who come in on what’s supposed to be Juliet’s wedding morning to Paris, only to find that she’s dead – or so they think.

I like Stowell’s handling of the bier scene in the mausoleum. In some versions, Romeo comes in with the rest of the mourners, disguised as one of them. Not here. Romeo comes passionately running in, as if he had heard the news from great distance and wearing his grief of her presumed death, only to encounter Paris, swiftly dispatching him.

Kaori Nakamura and Olivier Wevers as the tragic pair were simply and wonderfully amazing. Perhaps it may be that they used to be married to each other and that their own, personal ups and downs were being played out here, but their depth and level of acting, particularly from Wevers, was gut-wrenching.

Stowell’s vision and version of this ballet serves the Company very well and is a visual – and kinetic -- treasure with AMPLE dancing!

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Dean Speer
ballet@u.washington.edu


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