public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Tue Jul 29, 2014 4:58 am

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 52 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2005 5:15 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 6778
Location: Estonia
Quote:
Opening the Tomb
Two choreographers awaken sleeping ballets, one by adjusting history, one by starting over
by DEBORAH JOWITT for the Village Voice

He understands well the interplay of intricate footwork, jumps, and adagio moments. The first act effectively mingles leaping hunters and huntresses with an elegant pas de deux, which includes a fine side-by-side passage of rapid leaps and beats for the lovers.

published: August 2, 2005
more...


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 1:47 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2003 11:01 pm
Posts: 6778
Location: Estonia
Quote:
Stalin's motives for attack on Shostakovich ballet still unclear
by JULIA KOCICH for the Financial Times

This curtain is unique to this current production and includes, among the slogans and quotations from Stalin ("We Bolsheviks will do all we can to provide a cow for each collective farmer"), phrases from the infamous Pravda editorial of February 6 1936 that castigated Shostakovich's score for this ballet ("Noise, not music") and the work itself as "ballet falsity".

published: August 5, 2005
more...


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Svetlana Zakharova At The Met
PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2005 9:18 am 
Svetlana Zakharova At The Met

I attended two performances with this new wonder girl: Don Quixote on the 18th of July and The Pharaoh's Daughter of the 30th. It was the very first time that I saw the Bolshoi production of DQ and I must say that I am rather disappointed. Precious little is left from the original production of Marius Petipa. What had overlaid it is an unfortunate mixture of fair choreography of Ivanov along with variety show high leg kicks and other wow effects of the Soviet period, Fadeechev and who else not. And among all that like some precious jewel shines genius of Petipa in the scene of Don Quixote' Dream!

But Svetlana Zakharova is a different story. To begin with I was somewhat surprised at how well known she already is in New York. Hardly had she stepped out to the stage when the audience started to applaud. To be completely honest with you, save for the Dream scene, the role of Kitri is not ideal for her. Regardless, one could easily see that she is a rare bird, a quintessential classical dancer with the gifts from gods.

The role of Aspicia suites her like a glove. Actually most dancers favored well in this spectacular ballet-show. It is true, that most of the choreography is not of Petipa but of the contemporary French choreographer Pierre Lacotte, who had made his career of restoring old ballets. But unlike the Bolshoi's Don Quixote where everything is a la "this" and a la "that", Lacotte's choreography preserves the flavor of the period, i.e. the 2nd half of the 19th century with its fondness of Ancient Egypt and pomp and circumstance of Russia's Imperial court. One dance of the River Guadalquivir has more genuine Spanish flavor in it than the whole of Don Quixote.

Back to Zakharova. It was not possible to take one's eye from her. Sure enough she dances with the lightness and precision of Vaganova school, but that's not it …

...As this incredible show of Ancient Egypt unfolded before the mesmerized audience, I was trying grasp the essence of Svetlana's talent. And the more I think about it, the more I come to the conclusion that it is not possible to dance the way Svetlana does without her physical properties: the exquisite arch of her elastic feet, her hyperextended legs and above all the fantastic curve of her neck and shoulders. She is the darling of fortune and this is all that is to it. You, be the judge:

The neckline
The feet
That face

I tend to agree with Balletomaniac about Ta-Hor as performed by Nikolai Tsiskaridze. The most surprising thing is that Nikolai is Bolshoi's #1 star. It's not even that I had expected too much of him - he just didn't deliver. The Pharaoh's Daughter gives a male dancer a wonderful opportunity to demonstrate his technique of petit batterie. Alas, Nikolai didn't take advantage of this opportunity, as his small beats were rather unexpressive if not downright sloppy as they were taken from the combination of 3rd and 4th position, rather than a proper 5th or 1st. It is especially evident if compared to the wonderful performance of Sergei Fillin who dances the role of Ta-Hor to Zakharova's Aspicia, now on DVD.

In contrast Sergei dances the role of Ta-Hor to the spoiled perfection, his foot work is the one to admire and learn from. His understanding of his partner - Svetlana Zakharova in this case - is beyond reproach. I must give Nikolai his due, however. The Pharaoh's Daughter (read the synopsis below) ends with the last duet of Aspicia and Ta-Hor. I'll tell you that never had I seen such sincere expression of love as they displayed in that scene: their arms interwoven, eyes seeking each other, heads touching ... And there was this indescribable sadness in it too, as they were to part again and this time forever!

Alas, it was just a dream. Shortly after Aspicia became a mummy and Lord Wilson (Ta-Hor) woke up.


Last edited by fedora on Fri Aug 26, 2005 9:13 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
  
 
 Post subject: The Pharaoh’s Daughter
PostPosted: Sun Aug 07, 2005 11:47 am 
A young English explorer, Lord Wilson, is traveling through Egypt. At the foot of the pyramid they meet a caravan of merchants. Fierce storm makes the whole company hide inside the pyramid. Once safe inside, the Arabic merchants offer Wilson to partake from their opium pipes. Driven by curiosity he does and the most wonderful metamorphosis occurs… One of the mummies comes to life! It is Apicia (Svetlana Zakharova), the daughter of the mightiest of pharaohs.

And Lord Wilson himself turns into a handsome Egyptian warrior Ta-Hor (Nikolai Tsiskaridze). And the adventure starts. During the hunt, Ta-Hor saves Aspicia from the lion. She naturally falls in love with her savior. In order to escape the marriage with the old Nubian king she flees the palace. But followed by the vengeful king, jumps into the Nile. Enchanted by her beauty and manners, God of the Nile saves her and helps her to reunite with her beloved Ta-Hor.

...Alas, it is only a dream. As the effect of the opium fades away, Aspicia assumes the form of the mummy sending her parting kiss and Lord Wilson wakes up


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 4:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 27, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 3375
Location: Canada
Posted by Redshoeslover:

I have not seen this company before and they are performing this week. I was wondering which to see. The Bright Stream fits more into my schedule this week, but if Spartacus is a must see, then I can try to fit it in this weekend. Sorry if I posted this in the wrong forum..Any thoughts?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2005 5:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2005 4:40 pm
Posts: 4
thank you for redirecting my post


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2005 1:09 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2004 11:01 pm
Posts: 328
Location: New Jersey
Between the two that you mentioned, I'd go with Spartacus, even though as I recall Bright Stream got decent reviews in NY (I didn't see it). But if they're doing one of the other works that they performed in NYC, Don Q or Pharaoh's Daughter, either of those would be worth considering even though neither is without flaws.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2005 10:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 943
Location: Santa Barbara, CA USA
Starting as a rant about the running of the Bolshoi, this article becomes a tepid review of "Bright Stream":

Quote:
It's a matter of principals
Lewis Segal, LA Times

Star power has always been central to the image and excitement of the Bolshoi Ballet. It was the reason that so many of us eagerly returned, tour after tour, to some of the most wretched choreography of the 20th century. And just five years ago — at a low ebb in the company's international reputation — it was the reason that American impresarios signed famed ballerina Nina Ananiashvili to dance the opening night of every ballet in every Bolshoi tour city.

But nearly all the Bolshoi's stars are missing from the roster at the Orange County Performing Arts Center, where the company opened a six-day engagement Tuesday. And for that loss you can blame not only illness and injury but also the vacuum created by the company's continual switch in artistic directors: on average, a different one every two years during the last decade.

more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2005 10:59 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 943
Location: Santa Barbara, CA USA
Quote:
Miscast heroics
Lewis Segal, LA Times

Set to a relentlessly bombastic score by Aram Khachaturian, the 1968 Yuri Grigorovich dance drama "Spartacus" was always muscle-bound Soviet kitsch. But back when the Bolshoi Ballet was a great company, this three-hour depiction of a Roman slave revolt could be cast with Russia's most passionate and heroic dancing actors. Moreover, the company as a whole gave it unstinting body-and-soul commitment. As a result, "Spartacus" became one of the ballet world's greatest guilty pleasures.

Don't take my word for it. There are several home video editions that prove exactly what the Bolshoi brought to "Spartacus" in its glory days — and exactly what was missing Saturday night at the Orange County Performing Arts Center.

more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2005 11:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 943
Location: Santa Barbara, CA USA
I just returned from this past Sunday's performance of Spartacus by the Bolshoi Ballet at OCPAC, and I can't disagree with most of what Segal says. The orchestra was the best thing of the afternoon, playing with passion and precision ballet orchestras normally lack. Maria Alexandrova was a wonderful Aegina, with a bright, sharp stage presence fairly oozing cunning, and Nina Kaptsova danced a good Phyrgia. The men weren't very interesting, but given the choreography they had, I don't blame them. The big solos were grunt choreography: stuff you did if you wanted to grunt, like grand jetes across the stage diagonal, both sides! Just like class. Some of it was downright insipid: the three shepherds with their twirling staves looked like they'd be more at home in top hats and tails on a Broadway stage. The choreography had no cumulative effect: it looked like busy work to fill out the music.

--Andre


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2005 6:35 am 
Quote:
But nearly all the Bolshoi's stars are missing from the roster at the Orange County Performing Arts Center, where the company opened a six-day engagement Tuesday

I personally find it odd that the management of the Bolshoi brought their best to the Met, but failed to convince them to continue with the tour through the rest of the country. It's like "… you, guys don't understand the fine art of ballet well enough to tell the difference anyway..." or even worse " … just a place to make a few bucks".

This disconcerting attitude opens a wonderful opportunity for the ensemble of Urii Grigorovich, which performs Spartacus to the spoiled perfection! I hope to see them at the Met as well.

In contrast, come October, Kirov-Mariinsky will bring their best to Detroit, MI - Vishneva and Lopatkina. It appears that this group takes the reputation of their theatre much more seriously.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2005 12:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 943
Location: Santa Barbara, CA USA
The last time the Bolshoi showed up in SoCal (for La Bayadere), it was widely believed that they brought their "B" company, or their lesser dancers, if there's such a thing. But this time, the Bolshoi were filling in for ABT who had cancelled their Thanksgiving engagement at OCPAC, so perhaps the theater managers were willing to take a less than optimal company configuration. I'm not sure which one I'd rather watch: ABT or a reduced Bolshoi.

The Kirov's engagement in LA is going to bring Vishneva and Lopatkina as well, for the opening and closing performances. They've been very good to us as we've seen almost all of their stars here on their last visits.

--Andre


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2005 10:38 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 943
Location: Santa Barbara, CA USA
An article about the Bolshoi's artistic director:

Quote:
Bolshoi's back
Laura Bleiberg, Orange County Register

To the delight of fans, the Bolshoi Ballet on Tuesday opens its third Orange County engagement in five years. And, not surprisingly to those who follow these things, the company arrives at Segerstrom Hall with yet another artistic director at the helm – its third in as many years.

The new man in charge, 36-year-old Alexei Ratmansky, had not gone lobbying for the job. Indeed, he wasn't even sure he wanted it when the invitation was extended to him at the end of 2003. Though he graduated from the company's esteemed academy, the Moscow Ballet School, Ratmansky was never actually a member of the Bolshoi. At the time, he was a principal dancer with the Royal Danish Ballet, living a good life in Copen hagen with his wife and son and enjoying a budding choreographic career.

more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2005 10:39 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 943
Location: Santa Barbara, CA USA
An explanation for the missing Bolshoi stars, which actually sounds plausible:

Quote:
Bolshoi's big stars missing
Laura Bleiberg, Orange County Register

Sergei Filin, Nikolai Tsiskaridze, Dmitri Belogolvtsev and Svetlana Zakharova are popular stars who will be missing in action in Costa Mesa. Fans who read the reviews from the other U.S. tour stops were piqued that Zakharova and Tsiskaridze performed in New York City.

Jane Hermann, senior vice president for ICM Artists, which is manager for the Bolshoi tour, called the flap a "tempest in a teapot."

more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2005 10:43 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2002 12:01 am
Posts: 943
Location: Santa Barbara, CA USA
A favorable review of "The Bright Stream":

Quote:
The Bolshoi turns deftly
Laura Bleiberg, Orange County Register

A charming and frothy ballet, "The Bright Stream," which opened Tuesday at the Performing Arts Center, is the clarion call of a new dawn at the Bolshoi Ballet.

The change could unsettle. Those who associate the Bolshoi with a certain thrill only – acrobatic partnering and melodramatic warhorses – might not recognize the newly fleet-footed company in artistic director Alexei Ratmansky's clever reinvention of this Soviet-era ballet, which features a fine but forgotten score by Dmitri Shostakovich.

more


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 52 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group