public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Sat Nov 01, 2014 1:02 am

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 60 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' in Orange Count
PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2002 8:06 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
Well, I have something else to add here. With all due respect I think what was discussed earlier might apply to the situation. When people come to the theater looking forward to seeing a particular dancer and are disappointed (which is natural) that the dancer is not in the cast this could affect how the depth of the company is nourished.<P>Even if we approach the new dancer with a perfectly open mind, that new dancer still is 'new' and still needs to gain time on stage. Lack of that stage time will show. Few dancers can enter a role whether it be Giselle or Siegfried at full emotional tilt. It's a difficult cycle to break, isn't it?<P>Similar situations have happened before - during the reign of Fonteyn and Nureyev at the Royal Ballet, during Baryshnikov and Makarova at ABT. People came to see those specific dancers and were disappointed even before the music began with others. And management wanting to make some money (perfectly understandable) schedules the popular dancers as much as possible - giving them more opportunities.<P>In order to foster artistic depth there is no substitute for the experience of being on the stage and dancing. Even great coaching cannot overcome lack of opportunity.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' in Orange Count
PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2002 8:30 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 96
Location: Barstow CA USA
Just a note on Stiefel, he is scheduled to dance Bayadare in London the beginning of March.<P>Basheva, I totally agree with your comment on experience. <P>And just to be clear, even though I thought there was a lack of depth to Herrera's dancing that is not to say I didn't enjoy the whole evening. <P>It has been many many years since I have seen the complete Swan Lake and I sat enraptured most of the evening — combination of music, sets and beautiful dancing. I bought tickets based on when I could go, not on casting, so it didn't really matter to me WHO was dancing! :-)


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' in Orange Count
PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2002 9:09 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 22, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 17498
Location: SF Bay Area
Experience is crucial, yes. But positive experience. A dancer with many years in a company but without good coaching will end up being technically proficient but without depth.<P>Yes, Lara, it seems more so the women than men I am disconnected from. Julie Kent comes to mind as technically proficient and beautiful to watch yet leaving me cold.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' in Orange Count
PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2002 8:51 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 29, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 369
Location: Los Angeles, CA
"Swan Lake"<BR>Saturday night, February 16, 2002<P>Odette-Odile: Irina Dvorovenko<BR>Prince Siegfried: Maxim Belotserkovsky<BR>Von Rothbart: Ethan Brown (acting)<BR>Von Rothbart: Carlos Molina (dancing)<P>There is much to like about this version of Swan Lake. Kevin McKenzie delivers a highly polished piece of theater while remaining true in many aspects to the original. His re-envisioned characterization of Von Rothbart is at times chilling, bringing a nice sense of completion to the story as a whole. The entire company gets to shine in this performance . <P>Others have gone over changes in detail already so I won’t belabor them here. <P>The new prologue with Von Rothbart seducing and ensnaring Odette was a nice addition. The transition between the creature and suave suitor is interesting and well done. It added a nice hint of menace to the story right from the get go. I could have done without the fondling of the swan at the end of the prologue though. That was a bit too much and left me (and many others by the sounds around me) feeling a bit like we were privy to some unspeakable act better left behind closed doors. The decision to make him a Ram-creature was worth note. The heedless strength of will of a Ram and sheer power it’s image brings to the piece adds a dangerous note to the sexual undertones. Ethan Brown’s creature Von Rothbart is dark, yet striking in his costume. As horrific as he can be, it’s hard not to take your eyes off of him.<P>The new first act was a welcome change. This was one sexy town where a good time is waiting just around the corner for anyone whos looking. And Prince Siegfried seems to want to get in on the action, but for all his attempts and all the women presented him, none really fill that space inside him. While Belotserkovsky’s Prince appears to be a good-time boy at first, his longing glances the happier townsfolk couples dancing at the end of Act I shows that he longs for something else and doesn’t really fit in. An interesting take on the character and his predicament which begs all kinds of questions about rebel teens and anyone who feels different and out of place. It also makes the change in act II where he wander s off into the woods alone rather than go hunting with his friends more clear and a bit more compelling. An attempt at escape or a personal journey of discovery perhaps?<P>The Pas de Trois, the only remaining dance true to the original in this act, was very well danced by Erica Cornejo, Maria Riccetto and Joaquin De Luz. De Luz is confident and fun loving as Benno, the Prince’s Friend. Buoyant and graceful, he handled his partners with grace and ease. Cornejo and Riccetto was delights to watch as they shared his attentions. <P>The transition between Acts I and II was seamless. Curtains flow across the stage changing the setting to the forest much like a cinematic "wipe" of old. Nice trick and well done. A special mention should go to the stage crew who managed to change the sets with so little noise I didn’t notice even though they were only hidden by a scrim of trees. <P>The Prince did not seem at all impotent as suggested in other posts. Belotserkovsky makes a clear choice to forego the bow. His decision to leave the bow behind is at once a peace offering to Odette and her Swans and a symbol of his willingness to give himself over to his heart. Irina Dvorovenko is demure and graceful as the Swan Odette. Her strength and technique as imposing here, but they’re only a glimpse of things yet to come. This is a great pairing which oozes intensity. Belotserkovsky’s Prince is naturally drawn to something unattainable. Dvorovenko’s Odette knows her limits and her doom to remain out of reach. Dvorovenko is so strong and graceful, the Prince appears to do little or nothing to launch her into her slow, gingerly paced whip turns. <P>Act III presented us with some well re-thought dances, the most interesting of which was the Neopolitan danced by two men, Sean Stewart and Ricardo Torres. While a show of male bravado and technique, it seemed these two were not quite in sync at times. In moments where they were supposed to be in unison, Stewart was just a bit ahead of the music. Torres showed some hidden strengths in turns and multiple pirouettes, but they both appeared to put too much into it too early, faltering a bit toward the end.<P>The appearance of Von Rothbart really sets things going again. He immediately stirs up the status quo at court, charming all the women, even wooing the queen. As he asserts hi power over the entire court he defies them by throwing his cloak on the throne even standing on it at one point. But none seem to mind. In fact, he is so alluring the entire court, men and women alike, move toward him under his power. In a display of contempt he sends them away. Carlos Molina was entrancing as Von Rothbart, mesmerizing the court and audience alike. <P>In terms of story, it was good to see the role of Von Rothbart expanded. Not only does it make some elements more clear, it adds something inherently missing in the traditional story. In terms of story structure, it is always important that the villain be just a bit more powerful, a bit more cunning than the hero. It increases the stakes, makes it more important and more rewarding when the hero overcomes his enemy and defeats him. And while Von Rothbart steals the show, it is the very nature of the nemesis to do so. We all remember Darth Vader and Hannibal Lecter. But they are each undone by the hero in the end. Ergo the welcome additions to Von Rothbart’s character. And perhaps the ultimate compliment to the dancers playing the roles were the scattered hisses and boos when they appeared for their curtain calls. <P>In an evening of remarkable performances, the night truly belonged to Dvorovenko. Her dual role of demure Swan and deliciously malicious Odile was a performance to remember. She truly seems born for this role. As odile, she revels in her mission to undo the Prince. And her technique and sheer strength shines through. Performing backward sautes in arabeque way from the Prince came across as nothing short of a dare. It was like watching some unspoken sparing match between two strong-willed lovers. Her look of teasing torment alone was enough to seal her ownership of this role. A wonderful, pliant extension, deep penche and her ability to balance forever on pointe was only overshadowed by her fouettes. Though she ended the traditional 32 fouettes a bit shaky, she looked as though she could have kept going a much longer. <P>And Belotserkovsky is far more than merely a capable partner. Effortless tour en l’air’s led into multiple pirouettes which settled quietly into nice, open fourths. Soaring leaps ended in high, Russian arabesques. The communication between the tow real life partners was about as intense as could be in this act.<P>In the end, Von Rothbart’s plans are undone. In this version the hero’s fling themselves off a cliff to remain together. No symbolic boat or barge appears to whisk them to a better place. Instead, a highly dramatic sunrise with billowing clouds rises on the lake, a single ray of light shining down on the spot where they landed. Dramatic, a bit over the top but effective and fulfilling. Von Rothbart’s demise at the hands of the lovers and his Swans is a bit dramatic, but in terms of story it also fulfills the desire to see the hero win out in the end. One change I would like to see if when the Prince jumps off the cliff. Rather then the headlong sprint I saw, I would like to have seen one brief moment where he stops on the edge, contemplates his fate then jumps. Perhaps a final look between he and Von Rothbart where the Prince makes it known Von Rothbart has lost afterall. <P>Set design by Zack Brown was impressive, moving from plaza to lakeside almost seamlessly. The transition from the court back to the lakeside appears an extension of the magic of Von Rothbart as columns and court fixtures fly away. Much more impressive than "Nutcracker" whose sets seemed an afterthought. But the costume design, while colorful and lively, appeared in places to be remnants of raids on previous ballets. <P>Overall, this was a remarkably well realized reworking of the original. In parts very true to Petipa, in parts wholly re-envisioned, it was well suited to the strengths of this company. The corps as a whole had opportunities to shine, the principals the chance to wow all. Die-hards might not like the changes, but I think a piece like this could go a long way toward connecting with a younger audience with it’s outsider looking for his place theme.<BR>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' in Orange Count
PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2002 9:34 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 96
Location: Barstow CA USA
2left feet,<P>I am a little confused about something you said: >>His decision to leave the bow behind is at once a peace offering to Odette and her Swans and a symbol of his willingness to give himself over to his heart.<<<P>I thought he received the bow and left it behind at his party before he meets the swans in Act II. It was when he went off alone during his birthday celebration that he meets the swans. He has already left the bow behind...or did I miss something.<P>The rest of your review was wonderful! I think you are right on how Sigfriend should have paused before that leap into the lake.<P>What were those boys jumping into to be able to go full tilt belly flop out of sight!?<P>lara


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' in Orange Count
PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2002 11:44 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Feb 17, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 1278
Location: Basking Ridge, New Jersey, USA
I agree with Basheva. There is an ebb and flow to a company's life, its strengths and weaknesses.<P>With the men, without Ethan and Angel (how about Malakhov? Is he along for this trip? His was an unbelievable von Rothbart last Spring in NY), I can see it being a bit of a shallow pool. But Julio and Carreño and Belotserkovsky are strong. Actually, I never thought I'd see the day when ABT's male roster would be as strong as it is now.<P>On the women's side, I think this is an in-between time. Dvorovenko is a star. Ananiashvili has a strong international reputation (has anyone out there seen her Swan?). There are several stars fading or faded. Jaffe and McKerrow are beautiful dancers who are near the end of their careers. But you are not seeing them this time around anyway. I still find Julie Kent a wonderful dancer. I saw her in Onegin in the spring and she was gorgeous. I haven't seen enough of Ashley Tuttle to comment. <P>Gillian Murphy and Paloma, well... With Gillian I think it's a matter of time for the artistry to catch up with the technique. Paloma should be there now, but I worry about her. I think she needs some TLC in terms of coaching and nurturing. No doubt she's a phenomenal talent.<P>So that leaves the up-and-comings. In a few years I think some of them will emerge from the ranks, but they are not there yet. Looking at a program from last spring, I see many possibilities: Yan Chen, Anna Liceica, Xiomara Reyes, Michele Wiles, Stella Abrera, Carmen Corella, Erica Cornejo, Erica Fischbach (in dramatic roles), for example. There are also the guest artists who may come from other companies to fill out the ranks in years to come. <P>I think the depth is there, but there's a lack right at the top, and there's a gap between the upper echelons and the soloists for the moment. It's not like the years when Makarova and Cynthia Harvey and Susan Jaffe and Amanda McKerrow and Mariana Tcherkassky and Gelsey and Leslie Browne and Martine Van Hamel and Cheryl Yeager and etc., etc. were all around (I'm not guaranteeing they all overlapped each other, but you get the idea). I think it will fill in soon. <P>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' in Orange Count
PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2002 12:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
SWAN LAKE<BR>Orange County Performing Arts Center<BR>Costa Mesa, California<BR>February 16, 2002, 8 p.m.<P>Choreography: Kevin McKenzie after Marius Petipa & Lev Ivanov<BR>Music: Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky<BR>Sets & Costumes: Zack Brown<BR>Lighting: Duane Schuler<P>The swan, the epitome of grace, Swan Lake the quintessential ballet. As the swan’s paddling feet are hidden beneath, so the ballerina’s steely strength is also hidden and we see only the serene glide across the lake. But the serenity of this lake also hides the roils of a nether creature. Artistic Director Kevin McKenzie’s new production premiered in May 2000 and brings closer to the surface the evil creature’s stranglehold on the swan’s curved grace. Tchaikovsky’s music is so wonderful not a moment of it should be wasted, and in this production McKenzie does not. What is usually the overture becomes a danced prologue in which we are introduced to the dual personas of Von Rothbart. As a nightmare monster he sees a lovely princess and after changing himself into his human duality he snatches and changes her to a swan. It is swiftly done and the story begins.<P>This production has some of the most sumptuous costumes and sets I have seen. No detail was overlooked. Full, many petty coated skirts, tassels, decorated boots, and truly lovely headpieces are seen throughout the four acts of the ballet. The sets, though grand and palatial, never descend into gaudy; they are lush but not overwrought. Sets, costumes, and lighting are wonderfully integrated and easily transport us into the fairy tale world of Swan Lake.<P>McKenzie has taken several of the male roles, Siegfried, Benno and the dual roles of Von Rothbart and enhanced their importance and opportunities to dance. The entire ballet therefore gains balance. Von Rothbart is the fulcrum upon which the story hinges. His ogre shape, danced by Ethan Brown, is as he truly is, but he moves easily into our world in his human shape danced by Carlos Molina. This concept lends interest and cohesion. It explains his existence and his ability to ensnare the princess and later enter the Queen’s court.<P>The first act pas de trois with Benno, danced by Joaquin De Luz, Erica Cornejo and Maria Riccetto was quite superb. Joyful beats, light fulsome jumps together with their youthful panache, brought a ready smile and well deserved applause. But the denouement of the entire act is in the wonderful soulful solo done by Maxim Belotserkovsky as Siegfried. This solo generally happens as the prince travels to the lake to hunt. But McKenzie has changed it. He has Siegfried dance during the birthday festivities on the palace grounds while still surrounded by his friends and celebrants. As each man and woman turns toward one another and become a twosome, Siegfried is left alone in a crowd. So his dance is amongst them but not with them and this accentuates his loneliness. It naturally follows that he wishes to leave it all and divert his mood by hunting. I found this change added emphasis to that beautiful solo. It was an inspired choice. And, Belotserkovsky danced it well.<P>A pause between acts is used as an opportunity to utilize one of the most beautiful musical themes in all of ballet. Usually this sweeping, soaring melody is played as an overture for Act II, with no one dancing. McKenzie, however, wisely chose to use this theme to send Siegfried on his journey to the lake. Another inspired choice.<P>Much of the traditional shapes for the corps de ballet have been altered; no longer are there always strictly straight lines or perfect circles. This adds interest and an almost pleasant disorder. The dances for the big swans and for the cygnets remain intact. And, now we meet Irina Dvorovenko’s Odette. Here is a strong, secure ballerina with easy quick and enduring balances – some quite breathtaking. She is an imperious Swan Queen. She doesn’t melt, she swoops. While she does it all marvelously, but it doesn’t connect to a love story. Though her lines are long, her view is short. There is little eye contact between Odette and Siegfried. Can there be love with no visual stimulus? It’s as though she is dancing with lowered eyelids, seeming never to raise them except to spot a turn or focus a balance. Odette can only connect to the audience through her connection to the prince, and in this viewer’s opinion, it never happens. It foreshortens her otherwise beautiful dancing. I never got a feeling of her ethereality, her vulnerability. There was no mystery, no wonderment or surprise in her eyes. She almost seemed to demand Siegfried’s promise instead of eliciting it.<P>In the third act amidst wonderfully detailed costuming and sets, Odile once again never really looks at, and therefore can’t mesmerize, the prince. As Von Rothbart’s human persona, Carlos Molina, oozed evil charm and attained dominance over the Queen and her court. If Siegfried didn’t seem to know what to do with, or didn’t want, the four princesses, Von Rothbart had no such problem. He soon had them dancing around him eager to do his will. I liked McKenzie’s idea to have each princess bring a group of dancers representing different ethnic cultures. It made sense, gave them a reason to be there. Especially enjoyable were Sean Stewart and Ricardo Torres dancing the Neapolitan variation. The male contingent of American Ballet Theater is looking great these days.<P>The Black Swan grand pas de deux was well done, albeit still lacking the essential connecting thread between the two principals. A firestorm of fouettés (though a falter at the finish) brought loud acclamation. Belotserkovsky was a bit less than I expected. What are often done as double cabrioles were kept to singles, and a landing or two included a bouncing arabesque leg, but on the whole it was clean and even. <P>McKenzie chose to have the lovers accept death and everlasting spiritual life rising before us as the sun came up over the lake. That rising sun was a nice touch – a new day. Altogether I enjoyed the several changes McKenzie has made. The story is clearer; there’s more opportunity for the male dancers. The company is looking sharp and clean. This is a beautiful production. It was also good to see the emergence of different shapes, sizes and colors amongst the dancers.<P>David Lamarche conducted with a fine and sensitive hand, enhancing the dance at a number of places.<P><BR>..............<P>I have been informed by an outside source that there was a cast change that was not announced. That Act III Von Rothbart was danced by Ricardo Torres, and Neapolitan was danced by Carlos Lopez. In subsequent correspondence with the theater I have not been able to confirm this cast change. The theater's communication to me indicates that the cast was as I have reported in my review.<BR><p>[This message has been edited by Basheva (edited February 19, 2002).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' in Orange Count
PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2002 4:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 29, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 369
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Lara: He takes the bow with him into the forest but sets it aside at the lake when the Swans fall back in fear of it. Several feints are made of this before it is finally set aside, therefor my belief it was his final submission to his feelings for another.<P>Basheva: I too was curious about the lack of eye contact between them in Act II. I was lucky enough to sit with a former ballernina from San Francisco (my teacher LOL). She explained that they cannot look directly at each other in Act II as a result of Von Rothbart's spell. It's only on Act IV when they break his spell that they fully see each other. My teacher pointed out this made her job as Odette even harder, dancing with her head bowed down through the entire act instead of looking up. They do look at each other in Act III, but it's Odile in full seduction mode. And I felt quite a bit of intensity when they're eyes finally met. That and Belotserkovsky spoke to her a bit when the audience was applauding at the end of the Black Swan pas de deux. Would love to have been a fly on the wall listening to what they were saying to each other.<P>Ed <BR>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' in Orange Count
PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2002 4:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
Hmmmm, Ed, interesting comment by your teacher. I have not heard that before. I remember a lot of eye contact between Fonteyn and Nureyev. Her surprised look when he first touches her. She tries to look away but he really 'forces' her to look at him. It is by doing that that Siegfried gains her trust. <P> Irina didn't show the initial fear enough....she was sharper, in my opinion, I didn't feel a delicacy. At a couple of points she pushed him away more from imperiousness than hesitation. She may change her view of the role in the future, she certainly has the potential.<P>Fonteyn was marvelous at showing the transition from bird to woman. I guess I shouldn't expect to see that again. She could actually make you weep. Markarova could do that just from the languid melting of her body. That's what I missed. <P>I did not feel a sweetness in Irina's portrayal of the swan. She snapped into a lot of her positions, rather than melting into them as I have seen so many others do. There was more of a grappling quality than a caressing quality. <P>I was discussing this with my husband today and we were considering that the young dancers of today have grown up in a much more explicit world, perhaps they have trouble with subtlety. All of our entertainment is much more explicit in content, leaving little to the imagination. It doesn't require nuance, and nuance is not seen and so it is not learned, nor missed.<P>But, then I am treading down the slippery slope of saying 'it's not how it used to be.... Image'<p>[This message has been edited by Basheva (edited February 17, 2002).]


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' in Orange Count
PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2002 9:43 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2001 11:01 pm
Posts: 96
Location: Barstow CA USA
Ed,<P>>>He takes the bow with him into the forest but sets it aside at the lake when the Swans fall back in fear of it.<<<P>Thanks, I missed that entirely, and I was rather looking for it too because I had seen the bow thing in the Makarova/Dowell video.<P>Lara


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' in Orange Count
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2002 6:25 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 13071
Location: San Diego, California, USA
From the Los Angeles Times:<P><B>ABT Soloists Embrace 'Swan Lake's' Passion</B><P>By LEWIS SEGAL, Times Staff Writer<P><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>In creating a new production of "Swan Lake" for American Ballet Theatre two years ago, artistic director Kevin McKenzie borrowed innovations from a number of previous stagings. <BR> During the prelude, for instance, he showed Rothbart turning Odette into a swan--an idea from the celebrated, influential Vladimir Bourmeister version of the 1950s. <BR> McKenzie even recycled a concept from the radical Matthew Bourne modern dance "Swan Lake" of 1995: a nasty, sensual youth seducing all the women at the ball, including the Queen Mother. <BR> But, at the Orange County Performing Arts Center on Friday, McKenzie's patchwork edition proved far less noteworthy than his casting: international stars Nina Ananiashvili and Julio Bocca dancing together for the first time on any local stage.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.calendarlive.com/top/1,1419,L-LATimes-Theater-X!ArticleDetail-51629,00.html" TARGET=_blank><B>MORE...</B></A> <BR>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' in Orange Count
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2002 9:51 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 22, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 17498
Location: SF Bay Area
Thanks for the insight, Nancy. I wonder if McKenzie will continue the tradition of bringing in talent at the top, rather than promoting from within. I don't think the company is quite at that stage that they can grow from within the ranks. What do others think?


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' in Orange Count
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2002 10:31 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 22, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 17498
Location: SF Bay Area
2LeftFeet and LaraH, I've been getting reports from CD readers who compare this "Swan Lake" to the pivotal work by Matthew Bourne (pivotal because it changes mindsets and is so influential). Since the two of you have seen Bourne's all-male version, is there any basis to the assertions that McKenzie borrowed from Bourne?


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' in Orange Count
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2002 10:39 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 22, 1999 11:01 pm
Posts: 17498
Location: SF Bay Area
A very telling essay by Jennifer Fisher:<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>The Many Faces of Odile-Odette<BR>The dramatic impact of 'Swan Lake' turns on the dual role. But the ABT's performers bring varying levels of skill to the black-white character.<P>JENNIFER FISHER, LA Times<P>It seems very much as if playing the dual role of good swan and bad swan in "Swan Lake" is more difficult than ever for today's American Ballet Theatre dancers. At least, this is the conclusion following swan sightings at four different performances last week at the Orange County Performing Arts Center.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><a href=http://www.calendarlive.com/top/1,1419,L-LATimes-Search-X!ArticleDetail-51641,00.html?search_area=Blended&channel=Search&search_text=Jennifer+Fisher target=_blank>More</a>


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: American Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' in Orange Count
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2002 1:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Feb 17, 2001 12:01 am
Posts: 1278
Location: Basking Ridge, New Jersey, USA
Basheva, thanks for your wonderful review. It brought back memories for me. As I think back on that performance I saw last spring with Dvorovenko and Belotserkovsky, I was impressed with her potential, with his partnering and stage appearance. I think what made it a memorable night for me was the addition of Malakhov as Rothbart. He was so evil and so right, that I think he kind of pulled it all together for me. It was not just Odette/Odile and Siegfried's show. Does that make sense?<P>Azlan, it will be interesting to watch how Kevin guides the development of the company in the next few years. The men have come from all over the place. We'll have to stay tuned and see what happens with the ladies...


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 60 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group