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 Post subject: Boston Ballet's 'Hunchback of Notre Dame'
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 2001 6:08 am 
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Image <BR>Choreographer Michael Pink<P><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><B>Ballet in the Pink: British choreographer brings raw, passionate epic to Boston</B><P>Theodore Bale, Boston Herald<P>It's an unusually warm and sunny morning and I'm waiting in a South End cafe for Michael Pink, the British choreographer who's in town to stage his epic ballet, ``The Hunchback of Notre Dame,'' which opens at the Boston Ballet on Thursday.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.bostonherald.com/entertainment/arts_culture/bbal03272001.htm" TARGET=_blank><B>More</B></A><P><BR>For more, go to Boston Ballet's press releases for <A HREF="http://www.criticaldance.com/ubb/Forum13/HTML/000165.html" TARGET=_blank><B>last week</B></A> and <A HREF="http://www.criticaldance.com/ubb/Forum13/HTML/000166.html" TARGET=_blank><B>this week</B></A>.<p>[This message has been edited by Azlan (edited March 27, 2001).]


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Ballet's 'Hunchback of Notre Dame'
PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2001 8:02 am 
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Ooh, not a good start:<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><B>`Hunchback' limps along</B><P>Theodore Bale, Boston Herald<P>An evening watching the Boston Ballet usually means seeing your favorite stars in glamorous or challenging roles, ones that demonstrate fully the prowess and artistry of the dancers. That certainly wasn't the case last night, when Michael Pink's ``The Hunchback of Notre Dame'' made its Boston premiere at the Wang Theatre.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><A HREF="http://www.bostonherald.com/entertainment/arts_culture/hunc03302001.htm" TARGET=_blank><B>More</B></A>


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Ballet's 'Hunchback of Notre Dame'
PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2001 12:20 pm 
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From the Boston Globe:<P><B>Boston Ballet is captivating in 'Hunchback'</B> <P>Ambitious work highlights the drama in its production<P>By Karen Campbell, Globe Correspondent, 3/30/2001 <P><BR> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Victor Hugo's tragic tale of the deformed bell ringer Quasimodo seems an odd choice for a story ballet.<P><BR>Aside from the obvious physical incongruities of a grotesque hunchback in the most elegant of dance aesthetics, the epic is laden with brutality, murder, obsession, vengeance, and persecution, leavened with only traces of humanity and a romance that is tainted by lust, cynicism, and betrayal.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P><BR><A HREF="http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/089/living/Boston_Ballet_is_captivating_in_Hunchback_%2b.shtml" TARGET=_blank><B>MORE...</B></A><BR>


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Ballet's 'Hunchback of Notre Dame'
PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2001 7:27 am 
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The composer for Hunchback is interviewed in this Boston Herald article by TJ Medrek:<P>`Hunchback' composer Feeney steps up writing for dance<BR> <A HREF="http://www.bostonherald.com/entertainment/arts_culture/feen04032001.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.bostonherald.com/entertainment/arts_culture/feen04032001.htm</A>


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 Post subject: Re: Boston Ballet's 'Hunchback of Notre Dame'
PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2001 9:17 pm 
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And this is a review by S.E. Arnold that I moved from another thread:<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Review: Boston Ballet, Hunchback of Notre Dame, Wang Center, March 31-April 8, 2000.<P>By S.E. Arnold<P>As if to establish some hellish key, a scene of horrific punishment concludes each of the three acts of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, choreographed by Michael Pink. In fact, the whipping of Quasimodo that ends act one, the nightmare of torture envisioned by Esmeralda that ends act two, and the lurid hanging of Esmeralda that ends act three celebrate the shape and cadence of malevolent enterprise. <P>Moreover, the oppressive moral fog of Hunchback embodied, for example, in the ever-present threat and delivery of punishment finds support in the muted but dramatic lighting and the faded pastel costumes of the Town people. Additionally, the mobile architectural shapes moved by dancers, i.e. as Gingoire follows Esmeralda to her home, connects the tangle of streets with the tangled morality of late Medieval Paris. In fact, the welcome Captain Phoebus enjoys (as his name implies he shines on the wicked as well as the righteous with fatuous abandon) whether in Lady Fleur de Lys's parlor or the brigand's den suggests their moral equality. Additionally, the topography of the action further twists the social strata together in moral collusion. For example, assaults happen upon Esmeralda on the street, in Lady Fleur's parlor, and in the Notre Dame belfry. Moreover, neither the literal nor the implied elevation of sanctuary in the cathedral belfry shields Esmeralda from Frollo's attempted rape or the misguided 'rescue' by the Town people. In fact, that final 'assault' on the sanctuary of Esmeralda by the common folk delivers her into rather than liberates her from the executioner's hand. In the end, all are complicit in the fateful and sadistic exercise of Frollo's power. <P>Although linked by common subject i.e. a cleric's lust for a female dancer destroys her; the special lexicon of movement invented to characterize common people, sordid activity, and emotional states puts Hunchback closer to Petrouchka than La Bayadere. In contrast, ballet (appropriate, one thinks, to her stainless-steal chastity) rules Esmeralda, her relationship with Captain Pheobus, as well as the bravura turning jumps worn by the male dancers, and the dance for the Ladies in Act II. Nevertheless, neither the antiseptic sounds of Philip Feeney's score (better for a movie than a dance) nor the principled formality of ballet refuses Esmeralda her gruesome fate. In fact, emblazoned on a scrim across the pale outline of Notre Dame, the word fate reveals the 'infernal machine' that selects the structure and drives the plot in Hunchback of Notre Dame. Additionally, the word also tells us to reject the idea of moral agency and to see the action instead through the prism of moral passivity and fatalism. Within this context, therefore, the public view of Esmeralda's hanging becomes mere spectacle- a sport. More importantly, if The Hunchback of Notre Dame as choreographed by Pink has any redemptive purpose, this display mocks and denies it. Appeals to accuracy (faithfulness to the source), to Aristotle (catharsis of pity and fear), to ideology (social criticism of any description), or to Romanticism to legitimize this on stage hanging are, in the mind of this reviewer, specious. <P>"That was the best ballet we've seen so far," a daddy chortled to his young children as they left the theatre. However, the grim logic reasoned by Pink in his Hunchback of Notre Dame and skillfully danced by the Boston Ballet, nonetheless, trips and falls, at least for this reviewer, over the body of a dead woman.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><p>[This message has been edited by Azlan (edited April 03, 2001).]


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