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 Post subject: Torn Between Two Loves, a Good Girl Must Choose
PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 11:38 am 
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Torn Between Two Loves, a Good Girl Must Choose
By JENNIFER DUNNING for the New York Times

"Raymonda" has always been too big, with too confusing a story line, to be entirely successful.

published:June 10, 2005
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 Post subject: American Ballet Theatre Studio Company
PostPosted: Sat Jun 11, 2005 3:11 am 
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10th anniversary of the American Ballet Theatre Studio Company
by TOBI TOBIAS for the Village Voice

Celebrating its 10th anniversary, the American Ballet Theatre Studio Company added guest appearances by alums to a program of contemporary works danced by the juniors.

published:June 10th, 2005
more in the second part of the linked article


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 13, 2005 12:21 pm 
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Newsday has an extensive feature on Marcelo Gomes, by Apollinaire Scherr:

Marcelo Gomes feature


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 13, 2005 9:04 pm 
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The only principal role still unannounced is the final Saturday Matinee of Giselle on July 16th. Who will it be?!

CASTING ANNOUNCED FOR FIFTH AND SIXTH WEEKS OF AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE’S 2005 SPRING SEASON AT METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE

Gillian Murphy to debut as Medora in Le Corsaire on Saturday, June 25

Carlos Acosta to debut as von Rothbart in Swan Lake on Saturday, July 2



6/13/2005 - Casting for the fifth and sixth weeks of American Ballet Theatre’s 2005 Spring Season at the Metropolitan Opera House was announced today by Artistic Director Kevin McKenzie.

The fifth week will begin with the Season’s final four evenings dedicated to the work of legendary choreographer Michel Fokine, including Les Sylphides, Petrouchka, Le Spectre de la Rose and Polovtsian Dances.

On Thursday, June 23, the Company will give the first of nine performances of Le Corsaire, with Julie Kent, Julio Bocca, Angel Corella, Xiomara Reyes, Jose Manuel Carreño and Herman Cornejo in the leading roles. The Friday, June 24 performance will feature the debuts of Tamás Solymosi as Conrad, Sascha Radetsky as Lankendem and Danny Tidwell as Birbanto. Debuts for Saturday, June 25 include Gillian Murphy as Medora, Stella Abrera as Gulnare and Carlos Lopez as Birbanto at the matinee, and Herman Cornejo as Lankendem and Jesus Pastor as Birbanto at the evening performance. With choreography by Konstantin Sergeyev, after Marius Petipa and staging by Anna-Marie Holmes, after Petipa and Sergeyev, Le Corsaire features music by Adolphe Adam, Cesare Pugni, Léo Delibes, Riccardo Drigo and Prince Oldenbourg. Based on the Lord Byron poem The Corsaire (1814), the ballet has sets and costumes by Irina Tibilova with additional costume designs by Robert Perdziola.

Swan Lake will have its first performance on Friday, July 1, led by Gillian Murphy, Jose Manuel Carreño and Marcelo Gomes. Debuts for the week include David Hallberg as von Rothbart at the matinee on Saturday, July 2 and Carlos Acosta in the same role on Saturday evening. Choreographed by Kevin McKenzie after Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov, Swan Lake is set to a score by Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky and features scenery and costumes by Zack Brown.

Countrywide Financial is the National Sponsor of American Ballet Theatre and Cole Haan is a Leading Benefactor. Graff Jewelers and Northern Trust are the 2005 Season Sponsors at The Metropolitan Opera House. ABT’s 2005 Spring Season is also made possible with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Tickets for American Ballet Theatre’s 2005 Metropolitan Opera House season, priced $22-$92, are available at the Met box office, by phone at 212-362-6000 or online at metopera.org. The Metropolitan Opera House is located on Broadway between 64th and 65th streets in New York City.

Complete casting follows:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FIFTH WEEK
Mon. Eve., June 20, 8 P.M. FOKINE CELEBRATION
LES SYLPHIDES – Murphy, Beloserkovsky, Kajiya, Fang
PETROUCHKA – Bocca, McKerrow, Gomes
LE SPECTRE DE LA ROSE – H. Cornejo, Reyes
POLOVTSIAN DANCES – Acosta, Part, Hidalgo
Tue. Eve., June 21, 8 P.M. FOKINE CELEBRATION
LES SYLPHIDES – Kent, Hallberg, Butler, Hamrick
PETROUCHKA – Bocca, Abrera, Gomes
LE SPECTRE DE LA ROSE – Corella, Riccetto
POLOVTSIAN DANCES – Radetsky, C. Corella, Paris
Wed. Mat., June 22, 2 P.M. FOKINE CELEBRATION
LES SYLPHIDES – Abrera, Gomes, Kajiya, Fang
PETROUCHKA – H. Cornejo, Reyes, Stappas
LE SPECTRE DE LA ROSE – Acosta, McKerrow
POLOVTSIAN DANCES – Saveliev, Abrera, Hidalgo
Wed. Eve., June 22, 8 P.M. FOKINE CELEBRATION
LES SYLPHIDES – Riccetto, Saveliev, Liceica, Boone
PETROUCHKA – Corella, Abrera, Zhurbin
LE SPECTRE DE LA ROSE – Tidwell, Reyes
POLOVTSIAN DANCES – Carreño, Boone, Paris
Thur. Eve., June 23, 8 P.M. LE CORSAIRE – Kent, Bocca, Corella, Reyes, Carreño, H. Cornejo
Fri. Eve., June 24, 8 P.M LE CORSAIRE – Wiles, Solymosi*, Acosta**, Riccetto, Radetsky*, Tidwell*
Sat. Mat., June 25, 2 P.M. LE CORSAIRE – Murphy*, Beloserkovsky, Stiefel, Abrera*, Saveliev, Lopez*
Sat. Eve., June 25, 8 P.M. LE CORSAIRE – Herrera, Gomes, Carreño, Reyes, H Cornejo*, Pastor*


SIXTH WEEK
Mon. Eve., June 27, 8 P.M. LE CORSAIRE – Herrera, Gomes, Carreño, Reyes, H. Cornejo, Radetsky
Tue. Eve., June 28, 8 P.M. LE CORSAIRE – Kent, Bocca, Corella, Reyes, Carreño, H. Cornejo
Wed. Mat., June 29, 2 P.M. LE CORSAIRE – Herrera, Gomes, Acosta, Riccetto, Radetsky, Pastor
Wed. Eve., June 29, 8 P.M. LE CORSAIRE – Murphy, Beloserkovsky, Stiefel, Abrera, Saveliev, Lopez
Thur. Eve., June 30, 8 P.M. LE CORSAIRE – Wiles, Solymosi, Acosta, Riccetto, Radetsky, Tidwell
Fri. Eve., July 1, 8 P.M. SWAN LAKE – Murphy, Carreño, Gomes
Sat. Mat., July 2, 2 P.M. SWAN LAKE – Herrera, Corella, Hallberg*
Sat. Eve., July 2, 8 P.M. SWAN LAKE – Kent, Bocca, Acosta*


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*Please note: First time in a role:
Fri., June 24 – Solymosi (Conrad), Radetsky (Lankendem), Tidwell (Birbanto) in Le Corsaire
Sat. Mat., June 25 – Murphy (Medora), Abrera (Gulnare), Lopez (Birbanto) in Le Corsaire
Sat. Eve., June 25 –H. Cornejo (Lankendem), Pastor (Bibanto) in Le Corsaire
Sat. Mat., July 2 – Hallberg as von Rothbart (Ballroom) in Swan Lake
Sat. Eve., July 2 – Acosta as von Rothbart (Ballroom) in Swan Lake

**Please note: First time in a role with ABT:
Fri., June 24 – Acosta (Ali) in Le Corsaire


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 14, 2005 9:19 pm 
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Re: ABT Giselle Poster in Front of The Met Opera House

I nearly walked right past it, because it was thematically similar to the picture of Alessandra Ferri which ABT uses this season on the front of its single ticket brochure and also displays in front of The Met with its array of other fantastic poster billboards. This portrait is a Fabrizio Ferri photograph of Alessandra as Giselle lying in a shallow grave of leaves, eyes closed, wrists crossed so as to protect her heart, white veil covering her face. The point of view is as though one has just accidentally discovered the grave in the forest. It is beautiful . . . but startling. It rather takes one to a place where the actual choreography never does. Incredibly imaginative. The Met rotates the posters out front. Today, this poster was to the far right toward the Avery Fisher side of the Met. Look for this beautiful poster, even if you don’t plan to see Giselle.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2005 7:13 am 
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Poohtunia -- you seem to have access to inside info. Do you think McKenzie might surprise us with the still uncast Giselle? And is Renata Pavan injured? My recollection is that she was originally cast in Les Sylphides, but was replaced, and I haven't seen her all season. If you (or anyone else) know anything, please pass it on. Thanks.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2005 7:54 am 
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Balletomaniac -- Poohtunia has no insider information - just the ABT press office on speed dial.

The final uncast Giselle has now been cast - Xiomara Reyes. The website casting is up to date. Until yesterday, it had been lagging behind the daily casting sheets available in the lobby at the Met Opera House.

No information on Renata Pavam.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2005 10:27 am 
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Set your VCRs.!

I don't know if anyone has already posted this, but on Monday June 20, they'll be broadcasting ABT's Swan Lake on PBS -- with Gillian Murphy and ANgel Corella.

More info can be found HERE :)

Apparently a "companion website" will be up tomorrow?


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 Post subject: July 16 Matinee Giselle
PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2005 8:36 pm 
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An interesting casting note to the July 16 matinee Giselle: Angel Corella's Albrecht will be confronted by sister Carmen Corella's Myrtha!

Poohtunia's pals say that her interpretation of the Giselle poster outside the Met (see above post from yesterday) was overly dramatic, and that Ferri is really standing up. It's still a pretty poster, and being overly dramatic is fun.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 1:09 am 
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Fokine Celebration. Just go. Get a cheap ticket, stand, sit in a side box, whatever. It’s extreme imagination meets craft and discipline. I caught the opening night Thursday at The Met.

Les Sylphides. I went with high expectations and the memory of Marianna Tcherkassky and Baryshnikov. The style is so exacting and difficult, not to mention generally ignored in today’s schools. It’s ballet that celebrates old values - rolling through the feet, the illusion of infinite line, jumps that land so as to maximize the air under the tulle skirt, truly making the movement appear effortless -- dancing impressions, not dancing steps. Tonight’s dancers were polished and confident and definitely up to the task. The corps magnificently embraced the style. Gillian Murphy, Max Beloserkovsky, Maria Riccetto, and Yuriko Kajiya were the leads. Beloserkovsky is a born Fokine poet. Ms. Murphy is less comfortable with the slower, controlled movements, like the half turns in attitude. Ms. Riccetto’s Prelude and Ms. Kajiya’s Waltz were both lovely. I can’t wait to see the debuts of Stella Abrera and Ms. Riccetto in the leads over the weekend.

Petrouchka. Genius. Period. The layers of light and dark, humor and misery, were so well crafted in this not so simple story of three dolls and a charlatan to the Stravinsky score. Julio Bocca’s Petrouchka was touching. After the first half minute, one forgot it was Bocca. His doll’s misery and hopefulness were genuine. Amanda McKerrow was the self absorbed, flex footed ballerina doll and object of desire for both Petrouchka and the Moor (Marcelo Gomes). Gomes was superb, dancing with a coconut, yes a coconut, and creating a dark, threatening character who was absolutely charming. Frederic Franklin was the charlatan. At 91 years old, he can still brilliantly steal the show.

Le Spectre de la Rose. Having seen Herman Cornejo in this several times, I’ve now forgotten the picture of Nijinsky. Even if you hate the music (Invitation to the Dance), because your classroom pianist played it for every grand allegro when you were growing up, you will love it here. Cornejo delights in possessing Xiomara Reyes’ dream. His jumps aren’t the only thing phenomenal - so is his acting.

Polovtsian Dances (from Prince Igor) did look a bit like opera ballet. Content was less than everything that preceded it in the evening, but it was crafted, creative and interestingly staged by Mr. Franklin. It features aggressive dancing by the corps and sensual solos for Ms. Abrera and Laura Hildago.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 4:07 pm 
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John Rockwell talks with Kevin McKenzie about casting a performance run in the New York Times:

Casting


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2005 7:10 am 
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John Rockwell reviews the Fokine program:

Quote:
Poetry, Splendor and Folk Life From a Rebel

By JOHN ROCKWELL
Published: June 18, 2005

Michel Fokine, who was born in St. Petersburg in 1880 and died in New York in 1942, led a rich and vastly influential life. He had a strong connection with American Ballet Theater, staging his "Sylphides" for the company as the first ballet at its first performance in January 1940. So it is fitting that the company should stage a "Fokine Celebration," a four-ballet program that opened on Thursday night at the Metropolitan Opera.

That said, while the evening had its delightful, even thrilling moments, it was not a complete success. Nor, it should be said, was Fokine's curious career. A rebel at the Maryinsky Theater, he joined with Diaghilev to create some of the most influential ballets of the early 20th century. Yet nothing of his varied output after this early burst of creativity has survived with anything like the popularity of his youthful ballets.


Click here for more.[/b][/quote]


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2005 11:03 pm 
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I returned for the Friday evening and Saturday matinee performances of the Fokine Celebration in order to see the many debuts.

Stella Abrera and Maria Riccetto debuted as the principals in Les Sylphides on Friday night and Saturday afternoon respectively. Abrera, impossibly long in line from fingers to feet, gave a beautiful performance. When she swept her arm forward to second arabesque, one sensed the push of the air. Abrera understands how to keep the movement extending without raising the arm too high. She has a grace reminiscent of Tcherkassky. Riccetto debuted before a matinee audience, many of whom were expecting to see Alessandra Ferri. Ferri was withdrawn from the cast only a few weeks ago. Imagine the pressure! I saw no signs of nerves from Riccetto. She gave an assured, dream quality performance. The only awkward moment was her sense of relief at the curtain call followed by her attempt to give the entire bouquet to her poet, Gennadi Saveliev. He pushed it back at her - even though he might have deserved a few flowers for his wondrous partnering.

Abrera’s poet was Marcelo Gomes, who is convincingly smitten with everyone he partners. His hands were all around Abrera without actually touching her. Then, when he could resist no longer, he lightly touched her wings. Abrera and Gomes made an attractive pair. She was able to return his romance as few others have. They are scheduled to dance Les Sylphides one more time at the Wednesday matinee.

Friday evening’s Petrouchka was Herman Cornejo. Xiomara Reyes and Isaac Stappas were the other puppets. Saturday matinee was danced by Angel Corella, Abrera, and Roman Zhurbin. Cornejo’s tragic-funny characterization was stronger than Corella’s, but I loved both of them. Reyes and Abrera each brilliantly captured the ballerina doll’s exaggerated sense of self. Stappas and Zhurbin didn’t quite fill the very big shoes left for them by Gomes’ Thursday night portrayal of the Moor.

Le Spectre de la Rose was danced by Corella and Amanda McKerrow on Friday night. I would rave about it if I hadn’t seen the Cornejo-Reyes cast the night before. Both performances were indeed wonderful, but Cornejo’s was memorable. The Saturday matinee was danced by Danny Tidwell and Reyes. Tidwell, a corps member with technical promise, was not ready for this. He got most of the steps, but not the unique arms, hands and head. He conveyed nothing about being in Reyes’ dream.

Polovtsian Dances looked much more exciting on Friday night with Carlos Acosta and Veronika Part. Acosta’s Warrior Chieftain was less of a gentleman and more to the obvious point with the princess and maidens than Gennadi Saveliev’s on Thursday evening. He was also much more daring in his tours. Saturday matinee had Sascha Radesky as the warrior. He actually performed the whole thing very well, and more aggressively than I anticipated. He was convincing with a hint of ruthlessness. But the pressure of the big finish apparently got to him on his final downstage pirouette. Oh well, he gets another chance on Tuesday night.

The brass in the orchestra was once again a big problem this afternoon. I hope they pull it together before Swan Lake, because those last four notes of brass are mighty important.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2005 10:08 am 
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It's hard to keep up with all the press ABT is getting this season.

Everything's the Same but What's Different
Jack Anderson
The New York Times
June 20, 2005

Quote:
There are times when seeing three performances of the same four one-act ballets in two days might be a chore. But this past weekend it became an adventure as American Ballet Theater continued its Fokine Celebration at the Metropolitan Opera House.

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/20/arts/dance/20foki.html


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2005 8:52 am 
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Fokine's timeless messages
Monday, June 20, 2005
BY ROBERT JOHNSON
Star-Ledger Staff

Quote:
NEW YORK -- The founding choreographer of Diaghilev's Ballets Russes, Michel Fokine brought ballet into the 20th century and his name remains synonymous with the triumphant revival of ballet in modern times. Fokine's name has not been heard so often lately, though, which makes it all the more important that American Ballet Theatre has chosen to present his ballets at the Metropolitan Opera House this season.
...

These magnificent ballets have much to teach the dancers of today; and much to reward contemporary audiences. Recalling the aesthetic principles of the Romantic era, they are fully integrated works of theater art and outstanding examples of dramatic dance.

http://www.nj.com/entertainment/ledger/index.ssf?/base/entertainment-0/111924457993360.xml&coll=1


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