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 Post subject: Cathy Marston
PostPosted: Sun Apr 14, 2002 10:49 pm 
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An interview with Cathy from the Independent (found via the FT site).

Quote:
Cathy Marston is not, has never been, nor ever will be, a man. Her gender may be common in the street, but in the exclusive club of ballet choreographers it is rare. Modern dance is crammed with powerful creative women - Isadora Duncan, Mary Wigman and Martha Graham invented the thing. But ballet, with few exceptions, has been sculpted by male hands. "Of the 25 or so choreographers I've worked for, none have been women," Marston says, crossing one fat-free, pipe-cleaner leg over the other and shaking a head of dark blond curls. "I've tried to figure out why and I can't."
This link is now only available to FT subscribers

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<small>[ 12 March 2003, 02:46 AM: Message edited by: Stuart Sweeney ]</small>


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 Post subject: Re: Cathy Marston
PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2002 3:49 am 
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Location: London, England; Tallinn, Estonia
Image <BR><small>Cathy dancing with the Henri Oguike Dance Company. Photo Chris Nash from <A HREF="http://www.diquero.fsnet.co.uk/" TARGET=_blank>Cathy's website</A></small><P>The article makes a good read and in the paper edition of The Indie has a lovely, big piccie of Cathy. One point of clarification - at one place there is a juxtaposition of the phrase 'bad choreography' just after a reference to the Henri Oguike Dance Company. I think it's clear from some discussion further on that Cathy didn't intend these two phrases to be linked, but for the avoidance of dance, Cathy has assured me that there was no intention to criticise Henri Oguike's choreography.<P>For those who would like to read more about Cathy, there is much to enjoy in <A HREF="http://www.ballet.co.uk/magazines/yr_02/apr02/cathy_marston_11.htm" TARGET=_blank><B>Cathy's diary on ballet.co</B></A><BR><p>[This message has been edited by Stuart Sweeney (edited April 16, 2002).]


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 Post subject: Re: Cathy Marston
PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2003 1:46 am 
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Dancer, choreographer, Royal Opera House artist. At just 27, Cathy Marston is ruling the roost
Interview by Jenny Gilbert for The Independent

When you turn up to interview the Royal Opera House's first ever Associate Artist, a choreographer whose CV is long on Royal Ballet premieres and whose diary is stuffed with dates for showing her work elsewhere, it's slightly odd to find her hurling herself around a studio at another choreographer's bidding.

Yet Cathy Marston, 27, is that rare bird: a high-flyer who refuses to abandon her home territory. And her reasoning is unassailable. She trained as a dancer (Royal Ballet Upper School), has always worked as a dancer (classical companies in Zurich and Lucerne), and says she feels like a dancer (she certainly looks like one). Besides, she says, she's not so arrogant as to believe there aren't lessons she can learn from a mature experimenter in stage narrative such as Kim Brandstrup.

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 Post subject: Re: Cathy Marston
PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2005 1:58 am 
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Cathy Marston
Interviewed by Lorna Sanders for Dancing Times

Cathy Marston explains: “I was always drawn to choreography. I danced around as a child and made up dances.” She studied at the King Slocombe School of Dance in Cambridge and joined the Royal Ballet Upper School at 16, attending choreography classes taught by Norman Morrice and David Drew. Involvement in Christopher Hampson’s creations also inspired her: “Ballet can be like that!” When she graduated in 1994 she won first and second prize at the Ursula Moreton Choreographic Competition. This included “the porn duet – as it was nick-named by Edward Watson”. The material grew from her own enjoyment of athletic, intricate partner work, “I was a bit of a daredevil”, and gave immediate indication of the unusual, off kilter work that is now typical.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 11:42 am 
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Ghosts
by JUDITH MACKRELL for the Guardian

Cathy Marston has skirted around literature in several of her works - Sophie's Choice, The Tempest, the private life of TS Eliot - but Ghosts is the first full text she has tried to choreograph. Ibsen's drama is a big, wordy challenge. Yet in trying to solve the problems she has set herself, Marston has forced a big jump forward in her own career.

published: September 24, 2005
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 25, 2005 5:28 am 
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Ghosts
By Jann Parry for The Observer

Cathy Marston ends her three-year tenure as associate artist with the Royal Opera House tonight, with the last performance of Ghosts, part of the ROH2 programme in the Linbury Studio. She has been able to work with exceptional collaborators, transforming the black-box theatre into a series of very different worlds. Though her choreography has often reflected the themes of productions on the main stage, Ghosts stands alone, anticipating Ibsen's centenary next year.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 26, 2005 2:09 am 
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Ghosts
By Donald Hutera for The Times


The ballet-trained choreographer Cathy Marston favours literary sources. Previous inspirations include Sophie’s Choice, The Tempest and the troubled psyche of T. S. Eliot’s wife, Vivienne Haigh-Wood.

Ghosts is a dance adaptation of Ibsen’s 1881 play. A study of social hypocrisy and hereditary disease, Ibsen’s intense moral drama is steeped in gloom. One of the Norwegian playwright’s abiding themes was how dominated we are by our past. As he chillingly put it: “We sail with a corpse in the cargo.”

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2005 12:18 am 
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Writhing bad, gesturing good
by LUKE JENNINGS for the Daily Telegraph

This is one of Marston's few conceptual errors; for the most part, her restructuring is deft. The best roles go to the men. Christopher Akrill's Captain Alvling slinks around the stage like a poacher's dog, long-toothed and randy.

published: September 26, 2005
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2005 12:25 am 
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Ghosts, Linbury Studio Theatre, London
by ZOE ANDERSON for the Independent

How do you dance a memory? The characters of Ibsen's Ghosts are haunted by past events. Cathy Marston moves the story into the present tense, showing us, step by step, the incidents Ibsen's characters remembered.

There are two problems here. Marston can't make it clear that Captain Alving and his son suffer from syphilis; all diseases are unmentionable in dance. Worse, Marston's treatment leads to a helplessly pedestrian ballet; these are dancers going through the motions of a plot.

published: September 26, 2005
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2005 2:44 am 
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Ghosts - Linbury Theatre, London
by CLEMENT CRISP for the Financial Times

Too much of the dance looks dutiful, predictably angst- ridden. And then Oswald appears (a role taken with stunning power by Matthew Hart) and the dance takes fire.

published: September 29 2005
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2005 6:56 am 
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Time flies when you're feeling clammy and claustrophobic
by JENNY GILBERTFIELD for the Independent

The clammy claustrophobia of this story can be intolerable. Knowing this, Marston brightens a few corners, inserting a gorgeous bread-making scene for the two maids in which they prance round the table playfully poking their elbows in great lumps of dough (a substance whose sexual suggestiveness is useful).

published:October 4, 2005
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2006 1:37 am 
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Quote:
Cathy Marston
by DONALD HUTERA for the Times
published: October 3, 2006

Next August Cathy Marston will begin directing the Berne Ballet. The delayed start gives the British choreographer time to establish her own company, which she launched last week at the Royal Opera House, where she was until recently an associate artist.

Marston’s triple bill, now touring the UK, covers five years of creation.
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